Star Wars Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN!

Weekly drawing for $100 credit. Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

More at Powell's


Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lauren Owen: IMG The Other Vampire



It's a wild and thundery night. Inside a ramshackle old manor house, a beautiful young girl lies asleep in bed. At the window, a figure watches... Continue »
  1. $18.90 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Quick

    Lauren Owen 9780812993271

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$37.50
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
25 Remote Warehouse Anthropology- Cultural Anthropology

More copies of this ISBN

Handwriting in America: A Cultural History

by

Handwriting in America: A Cultural History Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this engaging history, Tamara Plakins Thornton traces handwriting in America from colonial times to the present. Exploring such subjects as penmanship pedagogy, handwriting analysis, autograph collecting, handwriting experts, and calligraphy revivals, Thornton investigates the shifting functions and meanings of handwriting, showing, for example, how it came to be linked with individual identity and how in our times handwriting reflects a nostalgia for the past and a rejection of modernity.

"remarkable....Thornton writes what may be the first cultural history of penmanship. Dissecting its nuances, variations and implications, she teaches us what any penmanship master worth his blotter knew until recently; there is nothing trivial about the ways in which we shape our letters". — Edward Rothstein, New York Times

"Thornton's book is not only informative but also compelling". — David Nicholson, Washington Post Book World

"Filled with interesting and sometimes corrective information about penmanship and its prejudices... Thornton writes with a measured grace". — Thomas Mallon, The New Yorker

"Thornton's book, a swift and arresting history of handwriting, shows that the growing ubiquity of print lent handwriting meaning beyond the words it recorded.... In reading this wonderful book, I became completely convinced that handwriting, as Thornton maintains, is not only 'a phenomenon that reflects changing conceptions of self' but is 'one of the places where the self happened". — Katherine A. Powers, Boston Sunday Globe

"This elegant study again proves that, in the right hands, a narrow topic is an excellent window into broad issues of social structure, education and popularculture. Historian Thornton not only packs plenty of Americana into her history of handwriting but also relates trends in this country to European developments... Thornton's high-quality scholarship will satisfy exacting academic audiences, and her graceful prose will charm and entertain the general reader". — Publishers Weekly

Synopsis:

Copybooks and the Palmer method, handwriting analysis and autograph collecting-these words conjure up a lost world, in which people looked to handwriting as both a lesson in conformity and a talisman of individuality. In this engaging history, ranging from colonial times to the present, Tamara Plakins Thornton explores the shifting functions and meanings of handwriting in America. Script emerged in the eighteenth century as a medium intimately associated with the self, says Thornton, in contrast to the impersonality of print. But thereafter, just what kind of self would be defined or revealed in script was debated in the context of changing economic and social realities, definitions of manhood and womanhood, and concepts of mind and body. Thornton details the parties to these disputes: writing masters who used penmanship training to form and discipline character; scientific experts who chalked up variations in script to mere physiological idiosyncrasy; and autograph collectors and handwriting analysts who celebrated signatures that broke copybook rules as marks of personality, revealing the uniqueness of the self. In our time, concludes Thornton, when handwriting skills seem altogether obsolete, calligraphy revivals and calls for old-fashioned penmanship training reflect nostalgia and the rejection of modernity.

Synopsis:

In this engaging history, the author demonstrates handwriting in America from colonial times to the present. Exploring such subjects as penmanship, pedagogy, handwriting analysis, autograph collecting, and calligraphy revivals, Thornton investigates the shifting functions and meanings of handwriting. 57 illustrations.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780300074413
Author:
Thornton, Tamara Plakins
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Subject:
Social life and customs
Subject:
United states
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Handwriting
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
anthropology;cultural anthropology
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
19980531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
57 b/w illus.
Pages:
264
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.13 in 1.05 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Inequality by Design: Cracking the... Used Trade Paper $14.50
  2. Feminism and the Body (Oxford... Used Trade Paper $18.95
  3. Adventures of the First Settlers on... New Trade Paper $17.95
  4. Skipping Towards Gomorrah: The Seven...
    Used Trade Paper $4.50
  5. The Way We Never Were: American...
    Used Trade Paper $6.95
  6. The Lost City: The Forgotten Virtues... Used Trade Paper $7.95

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Calligraphy
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » American Studies
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » US History » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Games » Card Games » Bridge

Handwriting in America: A Cultural History New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$37.50 In Stock
Product details 264 pages Yale University Press - English 9780300074413 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Copybooks and the Palmer method, handwriting analysis and autograph collecting-these words conjure up a lost world, in which people looked to handwriting as both a lesson in conformity and a talisman of individuality. In this engaging history, ranging from colonial times to the present, Tamara Plakins Thornton explores the shifting functions and meanings of handwriting in America. Script emerged in the eighteenth century as a medium intimately associated with the self, says Thornton, in contrast to the impersonality of print. But thereafter, just what kind of self would be defined or revealed in script was debated in the context of changing economic and social realities, definitions of manhood and womanhood, and concepts of mind and body. Thornton details the parties to these disputes: writing masters who used penmanship training to form and discipline character; scientific experts who chalked up variations in script to mere physiological idiosyncrasy; and autograph collectors and handwriting analysts who celebrated signatures that broke copybook rules as marks of personality, revealing the uniqueness of the self. In our time, concludes Thornton, when handwriting skills seem altogether obsolete, calligraphy revivals and calls for old-fashioned penmanship training reflect nostalgia and the rejection of modernity.
"Synopsis" by , In this engaging history, the author demonstrates handwriting in America from colonial times to the present. Exploring such subjects as penmanship, pedagogy, handwriting analysis, autograph collecting, and calligraphy revivals, Thornton investigates the shifting functions and meanings of handwriting. 57 illustrations.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.