Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 21, 2014

Richard Bausch: IMG Why Literature Can Save Us



Our title is, of course, a problem. "Why Literature Can Save Us." And of course the problem is one of definition: what those words mean. What is... Continue »
  1. $18.87 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Before, During, After

    Richard Bausch 9780307266262

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$19.00
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
5 Remote Warehouse Music- Jazz
25 Remote Warehouse Biography- General

More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

Coltrane: The Story of a Sound

by

Coltrane: The Story of a Sound Cover

ISBN13: 9780312427788
ISBN10: 0312427786
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

John Coltrane left an indelible mark on the world, but what was the essence of his achievement that makes him so prized forty years after his death? What were the factors that helped Coltrane become who he was? And what would a John Coltrane look like now--or are we looking for the wrong signs?

In this deftly written, riveting study, New York Times jazz critic Ben Ratliff answers these questions and examines the life of Coltrane, the acclaimed band leader and deeply spiritual man who changed the face of jazz music. Ratliff places jazz among other art forms and within the turbulence of American social history, and he places Coltrane not just among jazz musicians but among the greatest American artists. Ben Ratliff has been a jazz critic at The New York Times since 1996. The author of The Jazz Ear and The New York Times Essential Library: Jazz, he lives in Manhattan with his wife and two sons. Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle AwardAn Artforum Best Book of the Year What was the essence of John Coltrane's achievement that makes him so prized forty years after his death? What was it about his improvising, his bands, his compositions, his place within his era of jazz that drew so many musicians and listeners to his music? Jazz writer and New York Times music critic Ben Ratliff addresses these questions in Coltrane. First Ratliff tells the story of Coltrane's development, from his first recordings as a navy bandsman to his last recordings as a near-saint, paying special attention to the last ten years of his life, which contained a remarkable series of breakthroughs in a nearly religious search for deeper expression. In the book's second half, Ratliff traces another history: that of Coltrane's influence and legacy. This story begins in the mid-'50s and considers the reactions of musicians, critics, and others who paid attention, asking: Why does Coltrane signify so heavily in the basic identity of jazz? Placing jazz among other art forms and American social history, and placing Coltrane not just among jazz musicians but among the greatest American artists, Ratliff tries to look for the sources of power in Coltrane's music--not just in matters of technique, composition, and musical concepts, but in the deeper frequencies of Coltrane's sound. Ratliff suggests, intelligently and persuasively, that Coltrane had, among other attributes, a 'mystic's sensitivity for the sublime, which runs like a secret river under American culture.' Ratliff patiently explicates Coltrane's legend, writing in short, aphoristic bursts, often as elliptically as his subject played tenor saxophone, but never less than lucidly.--Pankaj Mishra, The New York Times Book Review Engaging . . . clear-sighted . . . Ratliff suggests, intelligently and persuasively, that Coltrane had, among other attributes, a 'mystic's sensitivity for the sublime, which runs like a secret river under American culture.' Ratliff patiently explicates Coltrane's legend, writing in short, aphoristic bursts, often as elliptically as his subject played tenor saxophone, but never less than lucidly.--Pankaj Mishra, The New York Times Book Review

Coltrane: The Story of a Sound is not a biography but an extended, deeply informed analysis of the qualities that make Coltrane and his music so meaningful to people today, four decades after his death.--Matt Schudel, The Washington Post Book World

Ratliff, a New York Times jazz critic, has written a book that's neither a biography nor a critical study, although it has elements of both. It is, rather, a kind of cultural history . . . Ratliff writes extremely well, with terse, assured brio, as when he refers to Coltrane's 'serene intensity' or the 'incantational tumult' of his vast, cathedral solos.--Mark Feeney, The Boston Globe

Ratliff has turned me on to more music over the last few years than any other writer . . . The listening skills of a great critic and the ability to convey what he hears are what he brings here.--R. J. Smith, Los Angeles Times

Brilliant, economical . . . sharp . . . Ratliff] skillfully and convincingly places Coltrane as something of a man apart from most other musicians--a cultural comet, as much as a musical one.--Henry C. Jackson, San Francisco Chronicle

In his astute and unorthodox biography, Coltrane: The Story of a Sound, New York Times critic Ben Ratliff pays as much attention to Coltrane's haunting absence over the last forty years as he does to his brief decade of renown . . . As attentive a reader as he is a listener, Ratliff charts the rapid expansion of the mythology in various, often contradictory tropes: the humble music student and theorist who never stopped practicing and learning, the Christian into Eastern religious for whom pride was a far graver sin than wrong notes, the wordless spokesman for black civil rights and revolution, the unbound thinker who tripped across inner and outer space.--Richard B. Woodward, Bookforum

Ratliff condenses the biography proper into the first part of the book in order to devote himself in part two to a lengthy consideration of the saxophonist's influence since his death. Even more important, the book is less about music than it is about sound--as jazz musicians understand it . . . Ratliff's book is intelligent and compelling. The text and its sources reveal how seriously he took his task. In addition to working with biographies and interviews, some of which must have been difficult to locate, Ratliff also draws on obscure radio programs, various unpublished materials, thirty-nine interviews he conducted with musicians and countless conversations with people knowledgeable about jazz, American culture and New York City. Throughout he tackles topics that might seem the province of academics--such as the merits of Theodor Adorno's and Edward Said's ideas about 'late style'--with considerable skill and clarity . . . While Ratliff avers in his introdu

Synopsis:

In this major work about the great saxophonist--and about the state of jazz--Ratliff looks for the sources of power in John Coltrane's music, not just in matters of technique, composition, and musical concepts, but in the deeper frequencies of the musician's sound.

Synopsis:

"Ratliff has turned me on to more music over the last few years than any other writer. . . . The listening skills of a great critic and the ability to convey what he hears are what he brings here."--R. J. Smith, Los Angeles Times

John Coltrane left an indelible mark on the world. As an acclaimed band leader, a deeply spiritual man, and a fastidious worker, he changed the face of jazz music as we knew it in forty short years. In this deftly written, riveting biography, New York Times jazz critic Ben Ratliff addresses the life of John Coltrane, placing jazz among other art forms and American social history, and placing Coltrane not just among jazz musicians but among the greatest American artists.

Synopsis:

John Coltrane left an indelible mark on the world, but what was the essence of his achievement that makes him so prized forty years after his death? What were the factors that helped Coltrane become who he was? And what would a John Coltrane look like now--or are we looking for the wrong signs?

In this deftly written, riveting study, New York Times jazz critic Ben Ratliff answers these questions and examines the life of Coltrane, the acclaimed band leader and deeply spiritual man who changed the face of jazz music. Ratliff places jazz among other art forms and within the turbulence of American social history, and he places Coltrane not just among jazz musicians but among the greatest American artists.

About the Author

Ben Ratliff has been a jazz critic at The New York Times since 1996. He lives in Manhattan with his wife and their two sons. His New York Times Essential Library: Jazz was published in 2002.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

John McCarthy, January 5, 2010 (view all comments by John McCarthy)
Ben Ratliff goes way beyond a biography of one of the handful of true music geniuses of the 20th century, to explore the mind behind the sound. Coltrane continues to influence all adventurous musicians, and listeners, and the second half of the book reveals how and why. Ratliff opened my ears to re-listen to all my jazz collection again, as well as find additions to fill out Trane's explorations of sound.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 2 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312427788
Author:
Ratliff, Ben
Publisher:
Picador USA
Subject:
Jazz
Subject:
Composers & Musicians - Jazz
Subject:
cultural heritage
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Jazz
Subject:
Jazz musicians
Subject:
Saxophonists.
Subject:
Coltrane, John
Subject:
Jazz musicians -- United States.
Subject:
Composers
Subject:
Musicians
Subject:
Composers & Musicians
Subject:
Biography-Composers and Musicians
Subject:
Biography - General
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20081031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Includes three black-and-white photograp
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
7.88 x 5.45 x 0.7 in

Other books you might like

  1. Please Kill Me the Uncensored Oral... Used Trade Paper $7.50
  2. Steve Goodman: Facing the Music New Trade Paper $36.25
  3. Kind of Blue: The Making of the... Used Trade Paper $8.95
  4. The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia
    Used Hardcover $17.95
  5. The NPR Listener's Encyclopedia of... Used Trade Paper $9.95
  6. Catch a Wave: The Rise, Fall, and... Used Trade Paper $3.95

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Jazz
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Jazz » Biographies
Arts and Entertainment » Sale Books
Biography » Composers and Musicians
Biography » General

Coltrane: The Story of a Sound New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$19.00 In Stock
Product details 272 pages Picador USA - English 9780312427788 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In this major work about the great saxophonist--and about the state of jazz--Ratliff looks for the sources of power in John Coltrane's music, not just in matters of technique, composition, and musical concepts, but in the deeper frequencies of the musician's sound.
"Synopsis" by ,

"Ratliff has turned me on to more music over the last few years than any other writer. . . . The listening skills of a great critic and the ability to convey what he hears are what he brings here."--R. J. Smith, Los Angeles Times

John Coltrane left an indelible mark on the world. As an acclaimed band leader, a deeply spiritual man, and a fastidious worker, he changed the face of jazz music as we knew it in forty short years. In this deftly written, riveting biography, New York Times jazz critic Ben Ratliff addresses the life of John Coltrane, placing jazz among other art forms and American social history, and placing Coltrane not just among jazz musicians but among the greatest American artists.

"Synopsis" by ,

John Coltrane left an indelible mark on the world, but what was the essence of his achievement that makes him so prized forty years after his death? What were the factors that helped Coltrane become who he was? And what would a John Coltrane look like now--or are we looking for the wrong signs?

In this deftly written, riveting study, New York Times jazz critic Ben Ratliff answers these questions and examines the life of Coltrane, the acclaimed band leader and deeply spiritual man who changed the face of jazz music. Ratliff places jazz among other art forms and within the turbulence of American social history, and he places Coltrane not just among jazz musicians but among the greatest American artists.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.