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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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Schuyler's Monster: A Father's Journey with His Wordless Daughter

by

Schuyler's Monster: A Father's Journey with His Wordless Daughter Cover

ISBN13: 9780312538804
ISBN10: 0312538804
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

When Schuyler Rummel-Hudson was eighteen months old, a question about her lack of speech by her pediatrician set in motion a journey that continues today. When she was diagnosed with bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria (an extremely rare neurological disorder), her parents were given a name for the monster that had been stalking them from doctor to doctor, and from despair to hope, and back again.

Once they knew why Schuyler couldn't speak, they needed to determine how to help her learn. They took on educators and society to give their beautiful daughter a voice, and in the process learned a thing or two about fearlessness, tenacity, and joy.

More than a memoir of a parent dealing with his child's disability, Schuyler's Monster is a tale of a little girl who silently teaches a man filled with self-doubt how to be the father she needs.

Review:

"The monster in this heartfelt memoir is polymicrogyria, an extremely rare brain malformation that, in the case of Rummel-Hudson's daughter Schuyler, has completely impaired her ability to speak. During her first three years, as her parents seek to find out what hidden 'monster' is causing her wordlessness, they endure 'two years of questions and tests and at least one unsatisfactory diagnosis.' But while Rummel-Hudson initially rages at God for giving Schuyler 'a life that would never ever be what we'd imagined it to be,' his depiction of her next four years becomes a study not only in Schuyler's vivacious and resilient personality, but also in the redeeming power of understanding and a 'stupid blind father's love.' As he describes how Schuyler eagerly takes to various forms of communication, such as basic sign language and an alternative and augmentative communication device that provides whole words she can type to express her thoughts, Rummel-Hudson effectively and compassionately shows how the 'gentle strangeness about her, like a visitor from some realm where no one spoke but everyone laughed,' leads him to understand that 'she was the one teaching me how to make my way in this new world.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A gripping explication, shot through with equal parts horror and hope, of how parenthood can turn ordinary people into passionate advocates." Neal Pollack, author of Alternadad

Review:

"Robert Rummel-Hudson is brave enough to reveal the damage the discovery of his child's condition did to his marriage and to his own sense of self. He manages to repair some of the damage through close involvement with Schuyler and vigorous campaigning on her behalf. His memoir is honest, often painful and deeply personal." Charlotte Moore, author of George & Sam

Review:

"The book is engaging and honest — I'm sure it will help many parents who are struggling to find the most loving way to help their children who have "issues." Dana Buchman, designer, author of A Special Education: One Family's Journey Through the Maze of Learning Disabilities

Review:

"Rummel-Hudson's memoir offers a moving account of his and wife Julie's unrelenting efforts to give their buoyant little girl a way to communicate." People magazine

Review:

"This memoir, full of fear and rage and disappointment and acceptance and advocacy and ferocious love, offers plenty of touchstones for parents who have dealt with diagnoses that are infuriatingly wrong or frighteningly right." Terri Mauro, author of The Everything Parent's Guide to Sensory Integration Disorder

Synopsis:

When Schuyler Rummel-Hudson was eighteen months old, a question about her lack of speech by her pediatrician set in motion a journey that continues today. When she was diagnosed with bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria (an extremely rare neurological disorder), her parents were given a name for the monster that had been stalking them from doctor to doctor, and from despair to hope, and back again.

Once they knew why Schuyler couldnt speak, they needed to determine how to help her learn. They took on educators and society to give their beautiful daughter a voice, and in the process learned a thing or two about fearlessness, tenacity, and joy.

More than a memoir of a parent dealing with his childs disability, Schuylers Monster is a tale of a little girl who silently teaches a man filled with self-doubt how to be the father she needs.

 

Robert Rummel-Hudson has been writing online since 1995.  His work has been recognized by the Diarist Awards at diarist.net, including citations for Best Writing, Best Overall Journal, Best Account of a Public or News Event, Best Dramatic Entry, and the Legacy Hall of Fame Award.  He has served three times as a featured panelist at JournalCon, an annual conference for online writers.  His online writing has been featured in articles in the Austin Chronicle, the Irish Times and the New Haven Register.  Robert and his family currently live in Plano, Texas. 

When Schuyler was 18 months old, a question about her lack of speech by her pediatrician set in motion a journey that continues today. When she was diagnosed with Bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria (an extremely rare neurological disorder caused by a malformation of the brain), her parents were given a name for the monster that had been stalking them throughout the search for the correct answer to Schuyler's mystery. Once they knew why she couldnt speak, they needed to determine how to help her learn.

Schuylers Monster is more than the memoir of a parent dealing with a childs disability. It is the honest, funny, and heart-wrenching story of the relationship between a unique and ethereal little girl and her father who struggles with whether or not he is the right dad for the job. It is the story of a family seeking answers to a childs dilemma, but it is also a chronicle of their unique relationships, formed without traditional language against the expectations of a doubting world. It is the story of a little girl who silently teaches a man filled with self-doubt how to be the father she needs.

“A gripping explication, shot through with equal parts horror and hope, of how parenthood can turn ordinary people into passionate advocates.”Neal Pollack, author of Alternadad
 
"Robert Rummel-Hudson is brave enough to reveal the damage the discovery of his child's condition did to his marriage and to his own sense of self. He manages to repair some of the damage through close involvement with Schuyler and vigorous campaigning on her behalf. His memoir is honest, often painful and deeply personal.”Charlotte Moore, author of George & Sam
 
“The book is engaging and honestI'm sure it will help many parents who are struggling to find the most loving way to help their children who have ‘issues.”Dana Buchman, author of A Special Education
 
"The monster in this heartfelt memoir is polymicrogyria, an extremely rare brain malformation that, in the case of Rummel-Hudson's daughter Schuyler, has completely impaired her ability to speak. During her first three years, as her parents seek to find out what hidden 'monster' is causing her wordlessness, they endure 'two years of questions and tests and at least one unsatisfactory diagnosis.' But while Rummel-Hudson initially rages at God for giving Schuyler 'a life that would never ever be what we'd imagined it to be,' his depiction of her next four years becomes a study not only in Schuyler's vivacious and resilient personality, but also in the redeeming power of understanding and a 'stupid blind father's love.' As he describes how Schuyler eagerly takes to various forms of communication, such as basic sign language and an alternative and augmentative communication device that provides whole words she can type to express her thoughts, Rummel-Hudson effectively and compassionately shows how the 'gentle strangeness about her, like a visitor from some realm where no one spoke but everyone laughed,' leads him to understand that 'she was the one teaching me how to make my way in this new world.'"Publishers Weekly

About the Author

Robert Rummel-Hudson has been writing online since 1995. During that time, his work has been recognized by the Diarist Awards at diarist.net and has been featured in the Austin Chronicle, the Irish Times, the New Haven Register, the Dallas Morning News, Wondertime Magazine and Good Housekeeping, as well as on American Public Radio's "Weekend America."

Robert and his family currently live in Plano, Texas, where Schuyler attends a special class for children who use Augmentative Alternative Communication devices. Much of her days are now spent in mainstream classes with neurotypical children her age.

More of Robert's observations on life with Schuyler can be found on his blog at www.schuylersmonsterblog.com.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

honeybee123, May 24, 2009 (view all comments by honeybee123)
As a teacher who is majoring in language and literacy for her masters, I was instantly intrigued and rightfully so. Robert depicts a very accurate picture of wrangling doctors and the public education system to work for his daughter. He also portrays an excellent picture of parents coping with their children's disabilities (coming from a family who's brother is disabled). All of this is wrapped up with witty prose and a deep sense of love for his daughter. An excellent, emotional read.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(2 of 3 readers found this comment helpful)
wrubin, January 27, 2009 (view all comments by wrubin)
Have you read The Story of Edgar Sawtelle? You'll definitely enjoy this poignant true tale of the mysteries of life without speech and its impact on family.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(5 of 10 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 2 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780312538804
Author:
Rummel-Hudson, Robert
Publisher:
Griffin
Subject:
Children with Special Needs
Subject:
Parental Memoirs
Subject:
Parenting - Fatherhood
Subject:
Fatherhood
Subject:
Self-Help : General
Subject:
People with disabilities
Edition Description:
Trade Paperback
Publication Date:
20090131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 x 0.652 in

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Related Subjects

Biography » General
Health and Self-Help » Child Care and Parenting » Special Needs
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Biographies
Health and Self-Help » Self-Help » General

Schuyler's Monster: A Father's Journey with His Wordless Daughter New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$18.99 In Stock
Product details 288 pages St. Martin's Griffin - English 9780312538804 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The monster in this heartfelt memoir is polymicrogyria, an extremely rare brain malformation that, in the case of Rummel-Hudson's daughter Schuyler, has completely impaired her ability to speak. During her first three years, as her parents seek to find out what hidden 'monster' is causing her wordlessness, they endure 'two years of questions and tests and at least one unsatisfactory diagnosis.' But while Rummel-Hudson initially rages at God for giving Schuyler 'a life that would never ever be what we'd imagined it to be,' his depiction of her next four years becomes a study not only in Schuyler's vivacious and resilient personality, but also in the redeeming power of understanding and a 'stupid blind father's love.' As he describes how Schuyler eagerly takes to various forms of communication, such as basic sign language and an alternative and augmentative communication device that provides whole words she can type to express her thoughts, Rummel-Hudson effectively and compassionately shows how the 'gentle strangeness about her, like a visitor from some realm where no one spoke but everyone laughed,' leads him to understand that 'she was the one teaching me how to make my way in this new world.'" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "A gripping explication, shot through with equal parts horror and hope, of how parenthood can turn ordinary people into passionate advocates."
"Review" by , "Robert Rummel-Hudson is brave enough to reveal the damage the discovery of his child's condition did to his marriage and to his own sense of self. He manages to repair some of the damage through close involvement with Schuyler and vigorous campaigning on her behalf. His memoir is honest, often painful and deeply personal."
"Review" by , "The book is engaging and honest — I'm sure it will help many parents who are struggling to find the most loving way to help their children who have "issues." Dana Buchman, designer, author of A Special Education: One Family's Journey Through the Maze of Learning Disabilities
"Review" by , "Rummel-Hudson's memoir offers a moving account of his and wife Julie's unrelenting efforts to give their buoyant little girl a way to communicate." People magazine
"Review" by , "This memoir, full of fear and rage and disappointment and acceptance and advocacy and ferocious love, offers plenty of touchstones for parents who have dealt with diagnoses that are infuriatingly wrong or frighteningly right."
"Synopsis" by ,

When Schuyler Rummel-Hudson was eighteen months old, a question about her lack of speech by her pediatrician set in motion a journey that continues today. When she was diagnosed with bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria (an extremely rare neurological disorder), her parents were given a name for the monster that had been stalking them from doctor to doctor, and from despair to hope, and back again.

Once they knew why Schuyler couldnt speak, they needed to determine how to help her learn. They took on educators and society to give their beautiful daughter a voice, and in the process learned a thing or two about fearlessness, tenacity, and joy.

More than a memoir of a parent dealing with his childs disability, Schuylers Monster is a tale of a little girl who silently teaches a man filled with self-doubt how to be the father she needs.

 

Robert Rummel-Hudson has been writing online since 1995.  His work has been recognized by the Diarist Awards at diarist.net, including citations for Best Writing, Best Overall Journal, Best Account of a Public or News Event, Best Dramatic Entry, and the Legacy Hall of Fame Award.  He has served three times as a featured panelist at JournalCon, an annual conference for online writers.  His online writing has been featured in articles in the Austin Chronicle, the Irish Times and the New Haven Register.  Robert and his family currently live in Plano, Texas. 

When Schuyler was 18 months old, a question about her lack of speech by her pediatrician set in motion a journey that continues today. When she was diagnosed with Bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria (an extremely rare neurological disorder caused by a malformation of the brain), her parents were given a name for the monster that had been stalking them throughout the search for the correct answer to Schuyler's mystery. Once they knew why she couldnt speak, they needed to determine how to help her learn.

Schuylers Monster is more than the memoir of a parent dealing with a childs disability. It is the honest, funny, and heart-wrenching story of the relationship between a unique and ethereal little girl and her father who struggles with whether or not he is the right dad for the job. It is the story of a family seeking answers to a childs dilemma, but it is also a chronicle of their unique relationships, formed without traditional language against the expectations of a doubting world. It is the story of a little girl who silently teaches a man filled with self-doubt how to be the father she needs.

“A gripping explication, shot through with equal parts horror and hope, of how parenthood can turn ordinary people into passionate advocates.”Neal Pollack, author of Alternadad
 
"Robert Rummel-Hudson is brave enough to reveal the damage the discovery of his child's condition did to his marriage and to his own sense of self. He manages to repair some of the damage through close involvement with Schuyler and vigorous campaigning on her behalf. His memoir is honest, often painful and deeply personal.”Charlotte Moore, author of George & Sam
 
“The book is engaging and honestI'm sure it will help many parents who are struggling to find the most loving way to help their children who have ‘issues.”Dana Buchman, author of A Special Education
 
"The monster in this heartfelt memoir is polymicrogyria, an extremely rare brain malformation that, in the case of Rummel-Hudson's daughter Schuyler, has completely impaired her ability to speak. During her first three years, as her parents seek to find out what hidden 'monster' is causing her wordlessness, they endure 'two years of questions and tests and at least one unsatisfactory diagnosis.' But while Rummel-Hudson initially rages at God for giving Schuyler 'a life that would never ever be what we'd imagined it to be,' his depiction of her next four years becomes a study not only in Schuyler's vivacious and resilient personality, but also in the redeeming power of understanding and a 'stupid blind father's love.' As he describes how Schuyler eagerly takes to various forms of communication, such as basic sign language and an alternative and augmentative communication device that provides whole words she can type to express her thoughts, Rummel-Hudson effectively and compassionately shows how the 'gentle strangeness about her, like a visitor from some realm where no one spoke but everyone laughed,' leads him to understand that 'she was the one teaching me how to make my way in this new world.'"Publishers Weekly

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