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More copies of this ISBN

Other titles in the Rabbis Cat series:

The Rabbi's Cat

by

The Rabbi's Cat Cover

ISBN13: 9780375422812
ISBN10: 0375422811
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The preeminent work by one of France's most celebrated young comic artists, The Rabbi's Cat tells the wholly unique story of a rabbi, his daughter, and their talking cat — a philosopher brimming with scathing humor and surprising tenderness.

In Algeria in the 1930s, a cat belonging to a widowed rabbi and his beautiful daughter, Zlabya, eats the family parrot and gains the ability to speak. To his master's consternation, the cat immediately begins to tell lies (the first being that he didn't eat the parrot). The rabbi vows to educate him in the ways of the Torah, while the cat insists on studying the kabbalah and having a Bar Mitzvah. They consult the rabbi's rabbi, who maintains that a cat can't be Jewish — but the cat, as always, knows better.

Zlabya falls in love with a dashing young rabbi from Paris, and soon master and cat, having overcome their shared self-pity and jealousy, are accompanying the newlyweds to France to meet Zlabya's cosmopolitan in-laws. Full of drama and adventure, their trip invites countless opportunities for the rabbi and his cat to grapple with all the important — and trivial — details of life.

Rich with the colors, textures, and flavors of Algeria's Jewish community, The Rabbi's Cat brings a lost world vibrantly to life — a time and place where Jews and Arabs coexisted — and peoples it with endearing and thoroughly human characters, and one truly unforgettable cat.

Review:

"Sfar, the French cartoonist behind the Little Vampire children's books, has come up with a hilarious and wildly original graphic novel for adults. The nameless, scraggly-looking alley cat who narrates the story belongs to an Algerian rabbi in the '30s. When the cat eats a parrot, he gains the power of speech and tries to convince his master to teach him the Torah, raising the question of whether the appropriate age for his bar mitzvah should be in human years or cat years. Of course, being a cat, he has plenty of impertinent opinions about Judaism. That's a delicious setup on its own, but it gets better when the cat loses his speech again halfway through, and the story becomes a broader, more bittersweet comedy about the rabbi's family and the intersection of Jewish, Arab and French culture. The rabbi's daughter Zlabya marries a young man from a nonobservant family in France. The Algerian family's visit with their Parisian in-laws is the subject of the final and funniest section of the book. Sfar's artwork looks as mangy and unkempt as the cat, with contorted figures and scribbly lines everywhere, but there's a poetic magic to it that perfectly captures this cat's-eye view of human culture and faith." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"[U]utterly charming....Sfar's artwork, crammed with detail...recalls that of Ludwig Bemelmans' Madeline books." Booklist

Review:

"Sfar's artwork is playfully exaggerated...his writing is smart and sharp....An unexpectedly haunting work from a major talent." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

The preeminent work by one of Frances most celebrated young comic artists, The Rabbis Cat tells the wholly unique story of a rabbi, his daughter, and their talking cat — a philosopher brimming with scathing humor and surprising tenderness.

In Algeria in the 1930s, a cat belonging to a widowed rabbi and his beautiful daughter, Zlabya, eats the family parrot and gains the ability to speak. To his masters consternation, the cat immediately begins to tell lies (the first being that he didnt eat the parrot). The rabbi vows to educate him in the ways of the Torah, while the cat insists on studying the kabbalah and having a Bar Mitzvah. They consult the rabbis rabbi, who maintains that a cat cant be Jewish — but the cat, as always, knows better.

Zlabya falls in love with a dashing young rabbi from Paris, and soon master and cat, having overcome their shared self-pity and jealousy, are accompanying the newlyweds to France to meet Zlabyas cosmopolitan in-laws. Full of drama and adventure, their trip invites countless opportunities for the rabbi and his cat to grapple with all the important — and trivial — details of life.

Rich with the colors, textures, and flavors of Algerias Jewish community, The Rabbis Cat brings a lost world vibrantly to life — a time and place where Jews and Arabs coexisted — and peoples it with endearing and thoroughly human characters, and one truly unforgettable cat.

About the Author

Considered one of the brightest and most talented of the younger generation of French comic artists, Joann Sfar has written or collaborated on more than one hundred books for adults and children. He has worked with some of the best young artists in France, including Christophe Bain, Emmanuel Giubert, and Lewis Trondheim. In the United States he's best known for his children's books, Little Vampire Goes to School, which made the New York Times best-seller list, and Little Vampire Does Kung Fu!, which was recently nominated for an Eisner Award. Sfar was awarded the prestigious Jury Prize at Angouleme for The Rabbi's Cat. He lives in Paris with his wife, two children, and the model for the rabbi's cat.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

readingcatfish, January 1, 2007 (view all comments by readingcatfish)
This excellent graphic novel begins with a rabbi's cat eating a parrot and gaining the gift of speech. The cat's subsequent opinions on Judaism are hilarious and insightful. The story takes place in Alergia and Paris in the 1930s and provides a warm and interesting picture of Jewish life and explores some of the differences between secular and religious Jews at that time.
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(11 of 19 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375422812
Author:
Sfar, Joann
Publisher:
Pantheon Books
Subject:
Graphic Novels - General
Subject:
General
Subject:
Graphic Novels
Subject:
Cats
Publication Date:
20050831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
COLOR ILLUSTRATIONS THROUGHOUT
Pages:
152
Dimensions:
10.44x8.16x.76 in. 1.67 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » Alternative
Fiction and Poetry » Graphic Novels » General

The Rabbi's Cat New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$24.00 In Stock
Product details 152 pages Pantheon Books - English 9780375422812 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Sfar, the French cartoonist behind the Little Vampire children's books, has come up with a hilarious and wildly original graphic novel for adults. The nameless, scraggly-looking alley cat who narrates the story belongs to an Algerian rabbi in the '30s. When the cat eats a parrot, he gains the power of speech and tries to convince his master to teach him the Torah, raising the question of whether the appropriate age for his bar mitzvah should be in human years or cat years. Of course, being a cat, he has plenty of impertinent opinions about Judaism. That's a delicious setup on its own, but it gets better when the cat loses his speech again halfway through, and the story becomes a broader, more bittersweet comedy about the rabbi's family and the intersection of Jewish, Arab and French culture. The rabbi's daughter Zlabya marries a young man from a nonobservant family in France. The Algerian family's visit with their Parisian in-laws is the subject of the final and funniest section of the book. Sfar's artwork looks as mangy and unkempt as the cat, with contorted figures and scribbly lines everywhere, but there's a poetic magic to it that perfectly captures this cat's-eye view of human culture and faith." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[U]utterly charming....Sfar's artwork, crammed with detail...recalls that of Ludwig Bemelmans' Madeline books."
"Review" by , "Sfar's artwork is playfully exaggerated...his writing is smart and sharp....An unexpectedly haunting work from a major talent."
"Synopsis" by , The preeminent work by one of Frances most celebrated young comic artists, The Rabbis Cat tells the wholly unique story of a rabbi, his daughter, and their talking cat — a philosopher brimming with scathing humor and surprising tenderness.

In Algeria in the 1930s, a cat belonging to a widowed rabbi and his beautiful daughter, Zlabya, eats the family parrot and gains the ability to speak. To his masters consternation, the cat immediately begins to tell lies (the first being that he didnt eat the parrot). The rabbi vows to educate him in the ways of the Torah, while the cat insists on studying the kabbalah and having a Bar Mitzvah. They consult the rabbis rabbi, who maintains that a cat cant be Jewish — but the cat, as always, knows better.

Zlabya falls in love with a dashing young rabbi from Paris, and soon master and cat, having overcome their shared self-pity and jealousy, are accompanying the newlyweds to France to meet Zlabyas cosmopolitan in-laws. Full of drama and adventure, their trip invites countless opportunities for the rabbi and his cat to grapple with all the important — and trivial — details of life.

Rich with the colors, textures, and flavors of Algerias Jewish community, The Rabbis Cat brings a lost world vibrantly to life — a time and place where Jews and Arabs coexisted — and peoples it with endearing and thoroughly human characters, and one truly unforgettable cat.

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