Tournament of Books 2015
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | January 12, 2015

    Christopher Scotton: IMG Five Hundred Mountains Destroyed for a @*&%$! Allegory!



    I found a hole in the perimeter fence on a Sunday when the haul trucks were idle and I could work my way up the shoulder of mountain undetected.... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$16.00
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
25 Local Warehouse Health and Medicine- Medical Specialties
2 Remote Warehouse Health and Medicine- Medical Specialties

This title in other editions

When Germs Travel: Six Major Epidemics That Have Invaded America and the Fears They Have Unleashed

by

When Germs Travel: Six Major Epidemics That Have Invaded America and the Fears They Have Unleashed Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The struggle against deadly microbes is endless. Diseases that have plagued human beings since ancient times still exist, new maladies like SARS make their way into the headlines, we are faced with vaccine shortages, and the threat of germ warfare has reemerged as a worldwide threat.

In this riveting account, medical historian Howard Markel takes an eye-opening look at the fragility of the American public health system. He tells the distinctive stories of six epidemics — tuberculosis, bubonic plague, trachoma, typhus, cholera, and AIDS — to show how how our chief defense against diseases from other countries has been to attempt to deny entry to carriers. He explains why this approach never worked, and makes clear that it is useless in today's world of bustling international travel and porous borders. Illuminating our foolhardy attempts at isolation and showing that globalization renders us all potential inhabitants of the so-called Hot Zone, Markel makes a compelling case for a globally funded public health program that could stop the spread of epidemics and safeguard the health of everyone on the planet.

Review:

"Markel (Quarantine!), a professor of the history of medicine at the University of Michigan and a practicing physician, argues that quarantines in the U.S. and other restrictive measures (such as mandatory kerosene baths at the Texas-Mexico border in 1917 to kill typhus-carrying lice) are based more on xenophobia than science. An outbreak of bubonic plague in San Francisco's Chinatown in 1900, for example, resulted in a complete cordon sanitaire around the district; the city's white merchants, however, could move freely within and outside of the area. Similarly in the early 1900s, trachoma, an infectious eye disease that was common throughout the U.S., became associated with Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. More recently, Haitian refugees in the 1980s were stigmatized as carriers of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Markel argues that though quarantines of immigrant populations may have lessened the chance of major epidemics during the early 1900s, such measures unfairly punish people for being poor and sick. And nowhere is this more important than in developing countries, where rates of tuberculosis, cholera, malaria, AIDS and other deadly diseases are highest. As increased travel continues to shrink distances and bring people together, germs will also travel more easily; the prevalence of infectious disease, therefore, is no longer a merely local issue. As Markel warns in this informative and important book, we must work to prevent and treat infectious diseases throughout the entire world because 'in public health terms, every city is a 'sister city' with every other metropolis on earth.' Agents, Glen Hartley and Lynn Chu. (May 11)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"A wonderful look at how infectious diseases have shaped society and changed our world. Howard Markel writes beautifully, and his perspective as both a trained historian and a dedicated physician make him a writer like no other." Abraham Verghese, Director, Center for Medical Humanities and Ethics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Review:

"A timely book. Markel, a medical historian and himself a physician, knows that the so-called general reader needs to be guided through the maze of technicalities, and he does the guiding in a text as readable as it is reliable. It reads like a thriller." Peter Gay, Sterling Professor of History Emeritus, Yale University

Review:

"Informative and important....Thoroughly researched, well argued, and replete with insightful, nuanced interpretations." St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Review:

"Compelling....Markel's accounts are powerful and his documentation extensive....Everyone who considers the United States a nation of civilized people should read this book." Wilson Quarterly

Review:

"Markel is...an astute observer of the fierce historical battles between people and germs, and he reminds us that the war goes on and on....Well-written and approachable." The Ann Arbor News

Review:

"A critically important book for this historical moment....A clarion call for the public (and the government) to recognize both the importance and the precariousness of public health as we enter the twenty-first century." Health Affairs

Review:

"Deft, interesting and informative." The Roanoke Times

Review:

"Dr. Markel is an epic historian, a wise scientist, and an elegant prose stylist....Written with humor, grace, insight, and warmth, When Germs Travel is a discerning portrait of illness, a comment on the immigrant experiences of the past and present, and a reflection on what it means to be a doctor in a society ruled by fear of contagion." Andrew Solomon, author of The Noonday Demon

Review:

"Markel writes with great attention to the human side of the story....A powerful, sweeping story about immigration, poverty, public health, scientific breakthroughs and medical failures." Chicago Free Press

Review:

"Highly readable....Dramatic and graphic." Tucson Citizen

Synopsis:

From medical historian and physician Markel comes a startling, revelatory book about the U.S. government's response to six epidemics that devastated 19th- and 20th-century America, and why the United States continues its tradition of blaming newcomers for many of its physical and social ills.

About the Author

Howard Markel is the George E. Wantz Professor of the History of Medicine and Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases at the University of Michigan, where he directs the Center for the History of Medicine. He is the author of the award-winning Quarantine! and numerous articles for scholarly publication, as well as for the New York Times, Harper's, the Atlantic, the Washington Post, and National Public Radio.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375726026
Author:
Markel, Howard
Publisher:
Vintage
Subject:
Infectious Diseases
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Emigration & Immigration
Subject:
Health and Medicine-Medical Specialties
Subject:
history;epidemiology;non-fiction;aids;disease
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Vintage
Publication Date:
20050631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
27 ILLUSTRATIONS IN TEXT
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8 x 5 x 0.76 in 0.675 lb

Other books you might like

  1. Plague: The Mysterious Past and...
    Used Hardcover $7.95
  2. Beating Back the Devil: On the Front... Used Hardcover $8.95
  3. Complications
    Used Hardcover $8.95
  4. Mountains beyond Mountains: The...
    Used Trade Paper $7.95
  5. Green Building Products: The... Used Trade Paper $8.95
  6. Hospital Sketches New Trade Paper $7.95

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Featured Titles
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Illnesses
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General

When Germs Travel: Six Major Epidemics That Have Invaded America and the Fears They Have Unleashed New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.00 In Stock
Product details 288 pages Vintage Books USA - English 9780375726026 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Markel (Quarantine!), a professor of the history of medicine at the University of Michigan and a practicing physician, argues that quarantines in the U.S. and other restrictive measures (such as mandatory kerosene baths at the Texas-Mexico border in 1917 to kill typhus-carrying lice) are based more on xenophobia than science. An outbreak of bubonic plague in San Francisco's Chinatown in 1900, for example, resulted in a complete cordon sanitaire around the district; the city's white merchants, however, could move freely within and outside of the area. Similarly in the early 1900s, trachoma, an infectious eye disease that was common throughout the U.S., became associated with Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. More recently, Haitian refugees in the 1980s were stigmatized as carriers of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Markel argues that though quarantines of immigrant populations may have lessened the chance of major epidemics during the early 1900s, such measures unfairly punish people for being poor and sick. And nowhere is this more important than in developing countries, where rates of tuberculosis, cholera, malaria, AIDS and other deadly diseases are highest. As increased travel continues to shrink distances and bring people together, germs will also travel more easily; the prevalence of infectious disease, therefore, is no longer a merely local issue. As Markel warns in this informative and important book, we must work to prevent and treat infectious diseases throughout the entire world because 'in public health terms, every city is a 'sister city' with every other metropolis on earth.' Agents, Glen Hartley and Lynn Chu. (May 11)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "A wonderful look at how infectious diseases have shaped society and changed our world. Howard Markel writes beautifully, and his perspective as both a trained historian and a dedicated physician make him a writer like no other." Abraham Verghese, Director, Center for Medical Humanities and Ethics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
"Review" by , "A timely book. Markel, a medical historian and himself a physician, knows that the so-called general reader needs to be guided through the maze of technicalities, and he does the guiding in a text as readable as it is reliable. It reads like a thriller."
"Review" by , "Informative and important....Thoroughly researched, well argued, and replete with insightful, nuanced interpretations."
"Review" by , "Compelling....Markel's accounts are powerful and his documentation extensive....Everyone who considers the United States a nation of civilized people should read this book."
"Review" by , "Markel is...an astute observer of the fierce historical battles between people and germs, and he reminds us that the war goes on and on....Well-written and approachable."
"Review" by , "A critically important book for this historical moment....A clarion call for the public (and the government) to recognize both the importance and the precariousness of public health as we enter the twenty-first century."
"Review" by , "Deft, interesting and informative."
"Review" by , "Dr. Markel is an epic historian, a wise scientist, and an elegant prose stylist....Written with humor, grace, insight, and warmth, When Germs Travel is a discerning portrait of illness, a comment on the immigrant experiences of the past and present, and a reflection on what it means to be a doctor in a society ruled by fear of contagion."
"Review" by , "Markel writes with great attention to the human side of the story....A powerful, sweeping story about immigration, poverty, public health, scientific breakthroughs and medical failures."
"Review" by , "Highly readable....Dramatic and graphic."
"Synopsis" by , From medical historian and physician Markel comes a startling, revelatory book about the U.S. government's response to six epidemics that devastated 19th- and 20th-century America, and why the United States continues its tradition of blaming newcomers for many of its physical and social ills.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.