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Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign

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Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Memphis in 1968 was ruled by a paternalistic "plantation mentality" embodied in its good-old-boy mayor, Henry Loeb. Wretched conditions, abusive white supervisors, poor education, and low wages locked most black workers into poverty. Then two sanitation workers were chewed up like garbage in the back of a faulty truck, igniting a public employee strike that brought to a boil long-simmering issues of racial injustice. With novelistic drama and rich scholarly detail, Michael Honey brings to life the magnetic characters who clashed on the Memphis battlefield: stalwart black workers; fiery black ministers; volatile, young, black-power advocates; idealistic organizers and tough-talking unionists; the first black members of the Memphis city council; the white upper crust who sought to prevent change or conflagration; and, finally, the magisterial Martin Luther King Jr., undertaking a Poor People's Campaign at the crossroads of his life, vilified as a subversive, hounded by the FBI, and seeing in the working poor of Memphis his hopes for a better America.

Review:

"Although many people know Martin Luther King Jr. died in Memphis, few know what he was doing there, observes labor historian Honey in this moving and meticulous account of the sanitation workers' strike in Memphis between January and April 1968. Marrying labor history to civil rights history, the University of Washington professor fluently recounts the negotiations that ensued after black sanitation workers revolted over being sent home without pay on rainy days, although white workers were paid. While showing how their work stoppage became a strike, then a local movement, before coalescing in the Poor People's Campaign, Honey also reveals King's shift in emphasis 'from desegregation and voting rights to the war and the plight of the working class.' He also vividly captures many dramatic moments, including marches and sermons as well as King's assassination and its violent aftermath. While familiar villains, famous civil rights activists and King himself often take center stage, the rank-and file workers, whose lives are revealed here, remain the story's heroes and martyrs. Honey's passionate commitment to labor is undisguised, making this effort a worthy and original contribution to the literature." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"Although many people know Martin Luther King Jr. died in Memphis, few know what he was doing there, observes labor historian Honey in this moving and meticulous account of the sanitation workers' strike in Memphis between January and April 1968. Marrying labor history to civil rights history, the University of Washington professor fluently recounts the negotiations that ensued after black sanitation workers revolted over being sent home without pay on rainy days, although white workers were paid. While showing how their work stoppage became a strike, then a local movement, before coalescing in the Poor People's Campaign, Honey also reveals King's shift in emphasis 'from desegregation and voting rights to the war and the plight of the working class.' He also vividly captures many dramatic moments, including marches and sermons as well as King's assassination and its violent aftermath. While familiar villains, famous civil rights activists and King himself often take center stage, the rank-and file workers, whose lives are revealed here, remain the story's heroes and martyrs. Honey's passionate commitment to labor is undisguised, making this effort a worthy and original contribution to the literature." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"By the early months of 1968, Martin Luther King Jr.'s public ministry was in free fall. The great moral power he had unleashed in Birmingham and Selma, Ala. — the nation made anew by peaceful protest — had given way to a sickening cycle of violence: white terrorism in the South, black rioting in the North, war in Vietnam. As the brutality accelerated, King himself came under repeated attack. Advocates... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Honey writes with a novelist's skill to make this critical chapter of our national history come alive." Seattle Times

Review:

"This stunning combination of impeccable scholarship, enhanced by fascinating oral histories and a page-turning style, results in an important contribution to labor history and to the literature of Martin Luther King." Library Journal

Book News Annotation:

Relating the story of King's last campaign, the 1968 strike in Memphis, Honey (ethnic, gender and labor studies, American history, U. of Washington, Tacoma) takes the reader from street protests and backroom deals to churches and union halls. Honey brings to life all the characters involved in this drama, including the strike leaders, the black ministers, the civil rights leaders, city politicians, and especially King himself. Annotation ©2007 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The definitive history of the epic struggle for economic justice that became Martin Luther King Jr.'s last crusade.

About the Author

Michael Honey is professor of ethnic, gender, and labor studies and American history at the University of Washington, Tacoma, and the author of two prize-winning books on labor and civil rights history. He lives in Tacoma.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393043396
Subtitle:
The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign
Author:
Honey, Michael
Author:
Honey, Michael K.
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Strikes and lockouts
Subject:
Sanitation Workers Strike, Memphis, Tenn., 19
Subject:
Labor & Industrial Relations - General
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
United States - State & Local - South
Subject:
United States - 20th Century/60s
Subject:
King, Martin Luther
Subject:
African American Studies-Black Heritage
Subject:
African American Studies-General
Publication Date:
20070115
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16 pages of illustrations
Pages:
640
Dimensions:
9.6 x 6.5 x 1.9 in 2.245 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » African American Studies » Civil Rights Movement
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Politics » Labor
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$31.50 In Stock
Product details 640 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393043396 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Although many people know Martin Luther King Jr. died in Memphis, few know what he was doing there, observes labor historian Honey in this moving and meticulous account of the sanitation workers' strike in Memphis between January and April 1968. Marrying labor history to civil rights history, the University of Washington professor fluently recounts the negotiations that ensued after black sanitation workers revolted over being sent home without pay on rainy days, although white workers were paid. While showing how their work stoppage became a strike, then a local movement, before coalescing in the Poor People's Campaign, Honey also reveals King's shift in emphasis 'from desegregation and voting rights to the war and the plight of the working class.' He also vividly captures many dramatic moments, including marches and sermons as well as King's assassination and its violent aftermath. While familiar villains, famous civil rights activists and King himself often take center stage, the rank-and file workers, whose lives are revealed here, remain the story's heroes and martyrs. Honey's passionate commitment to labor is undisguised, making this effort a worthy and original contribution to the literature." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Although many people know Martin Luther King Jr. died in Memphis, few know what he was doing there, observes labor historian Honey in this moving and meticulous account of the sanitation workers' strike in Memphis between January and April 1968. Marrying labor history to civil rights history, the University of Washington professor fluently recounts the negotiations that ensued after black sanitation workers revolted over being sent home without pay on rainy days, although white workers were paid. While showing how their work stoppage became a strike, then a local movement, before coalescing in the Poor People's Campaign, Honey also reveals King's shift in emphasis 'from desegregation and voting rights to the war and the plight of the working class.' He also vividly captures many dramatic moments, including marches and sermons as well as King's assassination and its violent aftermath. While familiar villains, famous civil rights activists and King himself often take center stage, the rank-and file workers, whose lives are revealed here, remain the story's heroes and martyrs. Honey's passionate commitment to labor is undisguised, making this effort a worthy and original contribution to the literature." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Honey writes with a novelist's skill to make this critical chapter of our national history come alive."
"Review" by , "This stunning combination of impeccable scholarship, enhanced by fascinating oral histories and a page-turning style, results in an important contribution to labor history and to the literature of Martin Luther King."
"Synopsis" by , The definitive history of the epic struggle for economic justice that became Martin Luther King Jr.'s last crusade.
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