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The Management Myth: Why the "Experts" Keep Getting It Wrong

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The Management Myth: Why the "Experts" Keep Getting It Wrong Cover

ISBN13: 9780393065534
ISBN10: 0393065537
All Product Details

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A brilliant, not-to-be missed account of the reasons why management thinks the way it does — and why they are flawed. If CEOS, consultants, top managers, and other financial wizards are so smart, how come they screw up so badly? Why is there no correlation whatsoever between a business school education and success in business? Why might you be better off studying something as irrelevant as — philosophy?

In The Management Myth, Stewart offers:

  • An insightful romp through the entire history of thinking about management, with memorable sketches of Frederick Winslow Taylor, Elton Mayo, Peter Drucker, Michael Porter, Tom Peters, and other management celebrities
  • A devastating critique of pseudoscience in management theory, from the scientific management movement to the contemporary disciplines of strategy and organizational behavior
  • A swashbuckling account of the rise and much-anticipated fall of management consulting, laced with personal tales about cryptic PowerPoint presentations; the bait-and-hold techniques that keep clients paying to be told what they already know; and the colorful internal politics at his own ill-fated consulting firm, where rivals for power found imaginative uses for an in-house shrink
  • Historical perspective on why so many CEOs make so much more than they deserve
  • A clear explanation of why the MBA usually amounts to so much BS

With wit and wisdom, Stewart makes an electrifying case that the questions and insights of management theorists belong not to the sciences but to philosophy, and that, in the final analysis, "a good manager is nothing more or less than a good and well-educated person."

Review:

"Stewart (The Courtier and the Heretic) reflects on his unconventional path to becoming a successful management consultant — despite a complete lack of business knowledge or experience, let alone an MBA. He offers an insider's perspective on the industry, revealing the astonishingly high routine consultant fees and the absurdity of leading firms depending on consultants fresh out of school to tell them how to run their business. Following in the footsteps of 'shamans,' consultants 'envelop their work with an aura of sacred mystery' and 'outrageously unjustified' levels of self-confidence to add to their perceived expertise. Gleefully revealing the magician's tricks, Stewart takes readers on a whirlwind tour of how this industry came to be a powerhouse. Filled with fascinating insider anecdotes and featuring a who's who in the consulting world, including Peter Drucker, Michael Porter and Bruce Henderson, this wry, absorbing book will enlighten executives about the value consultants actually bring to their clients." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"At last, a book that knocks the Kings of Consulting off their thrones. The Management Myth is a rare and often very humorous expose on the shenanigans behind the corporate empire..." John Perkins, best-selling author of Confessions of an Economic Hit Man and The Secret History of the American Empire

Book News Annotation:

Stewart, a longtime, successful management consultant begins this combination memoir-critique by claiming that management is really about morals and behavior not a set of scientific methods for producing outcomes. Thus, he has set himself at odds with the entire academic discipline of business management. From there he gives his take on the major management gurus of our time, and then exposes us to the very flawed world of management and management consulting. The anecdotes are revealing and the analysis is stimulating. As a tell-all book, this one is thoughtful and won't make Stewart many friends among the ranks of management consultants. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Don't go to business school. Study philosophy.

Synopsis:

Combining hands-on experience with contemporary fads in efficiency improvement, empowerment, and strategy, Stewart lays bare how little consultants have really done for the business of others — while making a killing for themselves.

Synopsis:

Fresh from Oxford with a degree in philosophy and no particular interest in business, Matthew Stewart might not have seemed a likely candidate to become a consultant. But soon he was telling veteran managers how to run their companies.

Striking fear into the hearts of clients with his sharp analytical tools, Stewart lived in hotel rooms and got fat on expense account cuisine — until, finally, he decided to turn the consultant's merciless, penetrating eye on the management industry itself. Alongside his devastating critique of management 'philosophy' from Frederick Taylor to Tom Peters, Stewart provides a bitingly funny account of his own days in a management consulting firm.

Combining hands-on experience with the theoretical underpinnings of contemporary fads in efficiency improvement, empowerment, and strategy, Stewart knows his stuff, and thus he lays bare how little consultants have really done for the business of others — while making a killing for themselves.

Synopsis:

If CEOS, consultants, top managers, and other financial wizards are so smart, how come they screw up so badly? Why is there no correlation whatsoever between a business school education and success in business? Why might you be better off studying something as irrelevant as--philosophy?

In The Management Myth, Stewart offers:
  • An insightful romp through the entire history of thinking about management, with memorable sketches of Frederick Winslow Taylor, Elton Mayo, Peter Drucker, Michael Porter, Tom Peters, and other management celebrities
  • A devastating critique of pseudoscience in management theory, from the scientific management movement to the contemporary disciplines of strategy and organizational behavior
  • A swashbuckling account of the rise and much-anticipated fall of management consulting, laced with personal tales about cryptic PowerPoint presentations; the bait-and-hold techniques that keep clients paying to be told what they already know; and the colorful internal politics at his own ill-fated consulting firm, where rivals for power found imaginative uses for an in-house shrink
  • Historical perspective on why so many CEOs make so much more than they deserve
  • A clear explanation of why the MBA usually amounts to so much BS

With wit and wisdom, Stewart makes an electrifying case that the questions and insights of management theorists belong not to the sciences but to philosophy, and that, in the final analysis, "a good manager is nothing more or less than a good and well-educated person."

About the Author

Matthew Stewart is a former management consultant and the author of the acclaimed The Courtier and the Heretic: Leibniz, Spinoza, and the Fate of God in the Modern World. He lives with his family in Santa Barbara, California.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

sharingman.erp, December 16, 2010 (view all comments by sharingman.erp)
i like it

Thanks,
Sharing Man
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393065534
Author:
Stewart, Matthew
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
Management - General
Subject:
Management
Subject:
Management -- Philosophy.
Subject:
Management Science
Subject:
Business management
Copyright:
Publication Date:
April 2009
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9.6 x 6.6 x 1.3 in 1.17 lb

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Related Subjects

Business » Consulting
Business » Human Resource Management
Business » Investing
Business » Management
Engineering » Engineering » General Engineering
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

The Management Myth: Why the "Experts" Keep Getting It Wrong New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$27.95 In Stock
Product details 352 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393065534 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Stewart (The Courtier and the Heretic) reflects on his unconventional path to becoming a successful management consultant — despite a complete lack of business knowledge or experience, let alone an MBA. He offers an insider's perspective on the industry, revealing the astonishingly high routine consultant fees and the absurdity of leading firms depending on consultants fresh out of school to tell them how to run their business. Following in the footsteps of 'shamans,' consultants 'envelop their work with an aura of sacred mystery' and 'outrageously unjustified' levels of self-confidence to add to their perceived expertise. Gleefully revealing the magician's tricks, Stewart takes readers on a whirlwind tour of how this industry came to be a powerhouse. Filled with fascinating insider anecdotes and featuring a who's who in the consulting world, including Peter Drucker, Michael Porter and Bruce Henderson, this wry, absorbing book will enlighten executives about the value consultants actually bring to their clients." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "At last, a book that knocks the Kings of Consulting off their thrones. The Management Myth is a rare and often very humorous expose on the shenanigans behind the corporate empire..." John Perkins, best-selling author of Confessions of an Economic Hit Man and The Secret History of the American Empire
"Synopsis" by , Don't go to business school. Study philosophy.
"Synopsis" by , Combining hands-on experience with contemporary fads in efficiency improvement, empowerment, and strategy, Stewart lays bare how little consultants have really done for the business of others — while making a killing for themselves.
"Synopsis" by , Fresh from Oxford with a degree in philosophy and no particular interest in business, Matthew Stewart might not have seemed a likely candidate to become a consultant. But soon he was telling veteran managers how to run their companies.

Striking fear into the hearts of clients with his sharp analytical tools, Stewart lived in hotel rooms and got fat on expense account cuisine — until, finally, he decided to turn the consultant's merciless, penetrating eye on the management industry itself. Alongside his devastating critique of management 'philosophy' from Frederick Taylor to Tom Peters, Stewart provides a bitingly funny account of his own days in a management consulting firm.

Combining hands-on experience with the theoretical underpinnings of contemporary fads in efficiency improvement, empowerment, and strategy, Stewart knows his stuff, and thus he lays bare how little consultants have really done for the business of others — while making a killing for themselves.

"Synopsis" by , If CEOS, consultants, top managers, and other financial wizards are so smart, how come they screw up so badly? Why is there no correlation whatsoever between a business school education and success in business? Why might you be better off studying something as irrelevant as--philosophy?

In The Management Myth, Stewart offers:
  • An insightful romp through the entire history of thinking about management, with memorable sketches of Frederick Winslow Taylor, Elton Mayo, Peter Drucker, Michael Porter, Tom Peters, and other management celebrities
  • A devastating critique of pseudoscience in management theory, from the scientific management movement to the contemporary disciplines of strategy and organizational behavior
  • A swashbuckling account of the rise and much-anticipated fall of management consulting, laced with personal tales about cryptic PowerPoint presentations; the bait-and-hold techniques that keep clients paying to be told what they already know; and the colorful internal politics at his own ill-fated consulting firm, where rivals for power found imaginative uses for an in-house shrink
  • Historical perspective on why so many CEOs make so much more than they deserve
  • A clear explanation of why the MBA usually amounts to so much BS

With wit and wisdom, Stewart makes an electrifying case that the questions and insights of management theorists belong not to the sciences but to philosophy, and that, in the final analysis, "a good manager is nothing more or less than a good and well-educated person."

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