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The Marketplace of Ideas (Issues of Our Time)

by

The Marketplace of Ideas (Issues of Our Time) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Calls for closer connections among disciplines can be heard throughout the world of scholarly research, from major universities to the National Institutes of Health. In Defense of Disciplines presents a fresh and daring analysis of the argument surrounding interdisciplinarity. Challenging the belief that blurring the boundaries between traditional academic fields promotes more integrated research and effective teaching, Jerry Jacobs contends that the promise of interdisciplinarity is illusory and that critiques of established disciplines are often overstated and misplaced.

Drawing on diverse sources of data, Jacobs offers a new theory of liberal arts disciplines such as biology, economics, and history that identifies the organizational sources of their dynamism and breadth. Illustrating his thesis with a wide range of case studies including the diffusion of ideas between fields, the creation of interdisciplinary scholarly journals, and the rise of new fields that spin off from existing ones, Jacobs turns many of the criticisms of disciplines on their heads to mount a powerful defense of the enduring value of liberal arts disciplines. This will become one of the anchors of the case against interdisciplinarity for years to come.

Synopsis:

"Crisp and illuminating . . . well worth reading."--

Synopsis:

According to Harvard professor Menand, at a time when competition to get into and succeed in college has never been more intense, universities are providing a less useful education. In "The Marketplace of Ideas," he assesses what is important in a traditional university---and what is not.

Synopsis:

Has American higher education become a dinosaur?

Synopsis:

Why do professors all tend to think alike? What makes it so hard for colleges to decide which subjects should be required? Why do teachers and scholars find it so difficult to transcend the limits of their disciplines? Why, in short, are problems that should be easy for universities to solve so intractable? The answer, Louis Menand argues, is that the institutional structure and the educational philosophy of higher education have remained the same for one hundred years, while faculties and student bodies have radically changed and technology has drastically transformed the way people produce and disseminate knowledge. At a time when competition to get into and succeed in college has never been more intense, universities are providing a less-useful education. Sparking a long-overdue debate about the future of American education, The Marketplace of Ideasexamines what professors and students'"and all the rest of us'"might be better off without, while assessing what it is worth saving in our traditional university institutions.

Synopsis:

The publication of has precipitated a lively debate about the future of the American university system: what makes it so hard for colleges to decide which subjects are required? Why are so many academics against the concept of interdisciplinary studies? From his position at the heart of academe, Harvard professor Louis Menand thinks he's found the answer. Despite the vast social changes and technological advancements that have revolutionized the society at large, general principles of scholarly organization, curriculum, and philosophy have remained remarkably static. Sparking a long-overdue debate about the future of American education, argues that twenty-first-century professors and students are essentially trying to function in a nineteenth-century system, and that the resulting conflict threatens to overshadow the basic pursuit of knowledge and truth.

About the Author

Louis Menand, professor of English at Harvard University, is the author of The Metaphysical Club, which won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize in History. A longtime staff writer for The New Yorker, he lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Table of Contents

List of Figures
List of Tables
Preface
and#160;
1 Introduction
and#160;
Part 1 Academic Disciplines, Specialization, and Scholarly Communication
and#160;
2 The Critique of Disciplinary Silos
and#160;
3 Dynamic Disciplines
and#160;
4 Specialization, Synthesis, and the Proliferation of Journals
and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; (coauthored with Rebecca Henderson)
and#160;
5 Silos versus Web
and#160;
6 Receptivity Curves: Educational Research and the Flow of Ideas
and#160;
and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Part 2 Interdisciplinary Alternatives
7 Antidisciplinarity
and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;
8 American Studies: Interdisciplinarity over Half a Century
and#160;
9 Integrative Undergraduate Education
and#160;
10 Implementing Interdisciplinarity
Appendix: Data Sources
Notes
References
Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393339161
Author:
Menand, Louis
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Author:
Jacobs, Jerry A.
Author:
Gates, Henry Louis
Subject:
Higher
Subject:
Educational Policy & Reform
Subject:
Educational Reform
Subject:
Education-Higher Education
Subject:
Sociology - General
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Issues of Our Time
Publication Date:
20101231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
20 line drawings, 17 tables
Pages:
176
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 0.9 in

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The Marketplace of Ideas (Issues of Our Time) New Trade Paper
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Product details 176 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393339161 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Crisp and illuminating . . . well worth reading."--
"Synopsis" by , According to Harvard professor Menand, at a time when competition to get into and succeed in college has never been more intense, universities are providing a less useful education. In "The Marketplace of Ideas," he assesses what is important in a traditional university---and what is not.
"Synopsis" by , Has American higher education become a dinosaur?
"Synopsis" by , Why do professors all tend to think alike? What makes it so hard for colleges to decide which subjects should be required? Why do teachers and scholars find it so difficult to transcend the limits of their disciplines? Why, in short, are problems that should be easy for universities to solve so intractable? The answer, Louis Menand argues, is that the institutional structure and the educational philosophy of higher education have remained the same for one hundred years, while faculties and student bodies have radically changed and technology has drastically transformed the way people produce and disseminate knowledge. At a time when competition to get into and succeed in college has never been more intense, universities are providing a less-useful education. Sparking a long-overdue debate about the future of American education, The Marketplace of Ideasexamines what professors and students'"and all the rest of us'"might be better off without, while assessing what it is worth saving in our traditional university institutions.

"Synopsis" by , The publication of has precipitated a lively debate about the future of the American university system: what makes it so hard for colleges to decide which subjects are required? Why are so many academics against the concept of interdisciplinary studies? From his position at the heart of academe, Harvard professor Louis Menand thinks he's found the answer. Despite the vast social changes and technological advancements that have revolutionized the society at large, general principles of scholarly organization, curriculum, and philosophy have remained remarkably static. Sparking a long-overdue debate about the future of American education, argues that twenty-first-century professors and students are essentially trying to function in a nineteenth-century system, and that the resulting conflict threatens to overshadow the basic pursuit of knowledge and truth.
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