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3 Remote Warehouse Children's Young Adult- Social Issue Fiction

Taking Care of Terrific

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Taking Care of Terrific Cover

ISBN13: 9780395340707
ISBN10: 0395340705
Condition:
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Synopses & Reviews

Synopsis:

Going to the park to broaden his horizons, fourteen-year-old babysitter Enid enjoys unexpected friendships with a bag lady and a black saxophonist.

About the Author

Lois Lowry is known for her versatility and invention as a writer. She was born in Hawaii and grew up in New York, Pennsylvania, and Japan. After several years at Brown University, she turned to her family and to writing. She is the author of more than thirty books for young adults, including the popular Anastasia Krupnik series. She has received countless honors, among them the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award, the California Young Readers Medal, and the Mark Twain Award. She received Newbery Medals for two of her novels, NUMBER THE STARS and THE GIVER. Her first novel, A SUMMER TO DIE, was awarded the International Reading Associations Childrens Book Award. Ms. Lowry now divides her time between Cambridge and an 1840s farmhouse in Maine. To learn more about Lois Lowry, see her website at www.loislowry.com

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Home School Book Review, November 1, 2014 (view all comments by Home School Book Review)
Fourteen year old Enid Irene Crowley lives on Marlborough St. in Boston, MA, with her lawyer father, her radiologist mother, and the family’s somewhat eccentric live-in housekeeper Mrs. Kolodny. She goes to the Carstairs School where her best friends are Trina Bentley and Emily Wentworth but definitely not Seth Sandroff whose father owns a television station and whose mother is a famous child psychologist, though with her other friends away at their camps she starts hanging out with Seth. Named for her father’s very rich great aunt, she hates her name and calls herself Cynthia. For the summer she has enrolled in a morning art class at the Museum of Fine Arts but will be babysitting four year old, over-protected Joshua Warwick Cameron IV, who doesn’t like his name either and wants to be called Tom Terrific, in the afternoons, planning to take him with her to the Public Garden to play while she draws assignments for her class.
In the Garden, Enid/Cynthia and Joshua/Tom make friends with a tall African-American saxophone player called Hawk and a bunch of old bag ladies. One day Tom counted 24 bag ladies in the park. After a successful adventure organizing a picket with the bag ladies to bring back root beer flavored popsicles, they concoct another adventure, with Seth’s help, to give the bag ladies a ride on the swan boats. The project is top secret, and they plan things very carefully so nothing can go wrong. Or can it? And what will Enid do when she is accused of kidnapping? There is actually a cute story somewhere in here, but author Lois Lowry, who has won two Newbery Medals for Number the Stars, which I liked, and The Giver, for which I personally didn’t care, has loaded it down with a lot of unnecessary baggage. The name of God is used as an exclamation, and the term “omigod” appears rather often, along with childish slang terms (crap, pee) and euphemisms (heck, darn).
Perhaps worse than this, Enid signs a petition regarding transvestites, talks with Mrs. Kolodny about “preverts,” speaks of Mrs. Kolodny’s gothic romances as stories in which heroines are seduced by sinister men, has a discussion with Seth about heroin-using prostitutes, jumps to the conclusion that when Ms. Cameron says that she is going away on a business trip she is really going off on a weekend with her boyfriend (which seems to end up being true), talks with Mrs. Kolodny about one of her soap operas that involves a lot of immorality, says that a man looks as if he were stoned, and describes Ms. Cameron’s dress as “low necked with lots of cleavage.” Most godly parents would probably rather not have their pre-teen and middle-school children introduced to such sordid topics. In addition, Enid does some lying and breaks Ms. Cameron’s rules for Joshua, and their escapade in the Garden involves some actual criminal activity��"but, of course, it’s all in the name of a good cause, which is simply saying that the end justifies the means. There are also references to drinking wine and beer and to slow dancing. I’m sorry, but I really can’t give this book a very good rating, especially for children.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Home School Book Review, November 1, 2014 (view all comments by Home School Book Review)
Fourteen year old Enid Irene Crowley lives on Marlborough St. in Boston, MA, with her lawyer father, her radiologist mother, and the family’s somewhat eccentric live-in housekeeper Mrs. Kolodny. She goes to the Carstairs School where her best friends are Trina Bentley and Emily Wentworth but definitely not Seth Sandroff whose father owns a television station and whose mother is a famous child psychologist, though with her other friends away at their camps she starts hanging out with Seth. Named for her father’s very rich great aunt, she hates her name and calls herself Cynthia. For the summer she has enrolled in a morning art class at the Museum of Fine Arts but will be babysitting four year old, over-protected Joshua Warwick Cameron IV, who doesn’t like his name either and wants to be called Tom Terrific, in the afternoons, planning to take him with her to the Public Garden to play while she draws assignments for her class.
In the Garden, Enid/Cynthia and Joshua/Tom make friends with a tall African-American saxophone player called Hawk and a bunch of old bag ladies. One day Tom counted 24 bag ladies in the park. After a successful adventure organizing a picket with the bag ladies to bring back root beer flavored popsicles, they concoct another adventure, with Seth’s help, to give the bag ladies a ride on the swan boats. The project is top secret, and they plan things very carefully so nothing can go wrong. Or can it? And what will Enid do when she is accused of kidnapping? There is actually a cute story somewhere in here, but author Lois Lowry, who has won two Newbery Medals for Number the Stars, which I liked, and The Giver, for which I personally didn’t care, has loaded it down with a lot of unnecessary baggage. The name of God is used as an exclamation, and the term “omigod” appears rather often, along with childish slang terms (crap, pee) and euphemisms (heck, darn).
Perhaps worse than this, Enid signs a petition regarding transvestites, talks with Mrs. Kolodny about “preverts,” speaks of Mrs. Kolodny’s gothic romances as stories in which heroines are seduced by sinister men, has a discussion with Seth about heroin-using prostitutes, jumps to the conclusion that when Ms. Cameron says that she is going away on a business trip she is really going off on a weekend with her boyfriend (which seems to end up being true), talks with Mrs. Kolodny about one of her soap operas that involves a lot of immorality, says that a man looks as if he were stoned, and describes Ms. Cameron’s dress as “low necked with lots of cleavage.” Most godly parents would probably rather not have their pre-teen and middle-school children introduced to such sordid topics. In addition, Enid does some lying and breaks Ms. Cameron’s rules for Joshua, and their escapade in the Garden involves some actual criminal activity��"but, of course, it’s all in the name of a good cause, which is simply saying that the end justifies the means. There are also references to drinking wine and beer and to slow dancing. I’m sorry, but I really can’t give this book a very good rating, especially for children.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780395340707
Author:
Lowry, Lois
Publisher:
Harcourt Brace and Company
Author:
Lowry, Lois
Location:
Boston :
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
Girls & Women
Subject:
Children's 9-12 - Fiction - General
Subject:
Social Situations - General
Subject:
Babysitters
Subject:
Parks
Subject:
Boston
Subject:
Boston (Mass.) Fiction.
Subject:
Social Issues - General
Subject:
Babysitters -- Fiction.
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-General
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Series Volume:
1334
Publication Date:
April 1983
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 4 to 6
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
176
Dimensions:
8.48x5.76x.73 in. .77 lbs.
Age Level:
09-12

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Children's » Situations » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Taking Care of Terrific New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.25 In Stock
Product details 176 pages Walter Lorraine Books - English 9780395340707 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Going to the park to broaden his horizons, fourteen-year-old babysitter Enid enjoys unexpected friendships with a bag lady and a black saxophonist.
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