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The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite's Guide to Self-Sufficiency

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The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite's Guide to Self-Sufficiency Cover

ISBN13: 9780399537776
ISBN10: 0399537775
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Read Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger's blogs and view their pictures on the Penguin Community.

It's time to take back the kitchen. It's time to unlock the pantry and break free from the shackles of ready-made, industrial food. It's time to cook supper.

The Lost Art of Real Cooking heralds a new old- fashioned approach to food-laborious and inconvenient, yet extraordinarily rewarding and worth bragging about. From jam, yogurt, and fresh pasta to salami, smoked meat, and strudel, Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger arm you with the knowledge and skills that let you connect on a deeper level with what goes into your body.

Ken and Rosanna celebrate the patience it takes to make your own sauerkraut and pickles. They divulge the mysteries of capturing wild sourdoughs and culturing butter, the beauty of rendering lard, making cheese, and brewing beer, all without the fancy toys that take away from the adventure of truly experiencing your food.

These foods were once made by the family, in the home, rather than a factory. And they can still be made in the smallest kitchens without expensive equipment, capturing flavors that speak of place and personality. What you won't find here is a collection of rigid rules for the perfect meal. Ken and Rosanna offer a wealth of recipes, history, and techniques that start with the basics and evolve into dishes that are entirely your own.

Review:

"Albala and Henderson follow up their The Lost Art of Real Cooking with an utterly charming collection of recipes and how-tos for the 21st-century hipster homemaker. Like postmodern Elizabeth Davids, they augment their own recipes with obscure, intriguing ones from earlier centuries, such as Apicius's fourth-century Apricot Minutal, which stews up the fruit with spices and garum, an ancient fish sauce. The book consists mostly of recipes — albeit for unusual, slow-food, and occasionally bizarre dishes such as injera (Ethiopian sourdough pancakes), liverwurst, thousand-year-old eggs ('among the scariest things I have ever tried at home'), kombucha, and butter sauce with ambergris (yes, the 'waxy glob that forms in the intestines of sperm whales, which they barf up') — but, like a quirky updated 1896 Fannie Farmer cookbook, it also includes eccentric but usable household hints and instructions, from soap-making to pounding a ring out of an old silver quarter (using an expedited method invented by Henderson's father). A fun gift for any curious reader, the book is a must-have for makers and urban homesteaders." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home is not about extreme, off-the-grid living. It’s for city and suburban dwellers with day jobs: people who love to cook, love fresh natural ingredients, and old techniques for preservation; people who like doing things themselves with a needle and thread, garden hoe, or manual saw.

Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger Henderson spread the spirit of antiquated self-sufficiency throughout the household. They offer projects that are decidedly unplugged and a little daring, including:

* Home building projects like rooftop food dehydrators and wood-burning ovens

* Homemaking essentials, from sewing and quilting to rug braiding and soap making

* The wonders of grain: making croissants by hand, sprouting grains, and baking bread

* Adventures with meat: pickled pig’s feet, homemade liverwurst, and celery-cured salami

Intended for industrious cooks and crafters who aren’t afraid to roll up their sleeves, The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home will teach you the history and how-to on projects for every facet of your home, all without the electric toys that take away from the experience of making things by hand.

About the Author

Ken Albala is professor of history at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California, where he teaches courses on the Renaissance and Reformation, Food History, and the History of Medicine. He is the author of many books on food, includ­ing Eating Right in the Renaissance, Food in Early Modern Europe, Cooking in Europe 1250–1650, The Banquet: Dining in the Great Courts of Late Renaissance Europe, Beans: A History (winner of the 2008 International Association of Culinary Professionals Jane Grigson Award), Pancake, and the forthcoming World Cuisines written with the Culinary Institute of America. He is also the editor of three food series for Greenwood Press with 27 vol­umes in print and is now editing a four-volume Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia. Albala has been the book reviews edi­tor of Food Culture and Society for the past six years and is now co-editor of the journal. He is currently researching a history of theological controversies surrounding fasting in the Reforma­tion Era and editing two collected volumes of essays, one on the Renaissance, the other on food and faith.

Rosanna Nafziger grew up on a mountain in West Virginia. She spent her girlhood working in the orchard, plant­ing beans, and selling pies at the farmers' market. Now she trans­lates the traditions of her Appa­lachian Mennonite upbringing to the urban kitchen on her blog, Paprikahead.com. A chef, nanny, and editor, she lives in San Francisco. This is her first book.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

a_m_kelsey, August 18, 2013 (view all comments by a_m_kelsey)
I found the excerpt on pickles fun and interesting. This year I will add some new old-fashioned pickles to my preserving repertoire!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780399537776
Author:
Albala, Ken
Publisher:
Perigee Books
Author:
son, Rosanna Nafziger
Author:
Hender
Author:
Nafziger, Rosanna
Author:
Henderson, Rosanna Nafziger
Subject:
History
Subject:
Cooking and Food-Historical Food and Cooking
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20121031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
8.66 x 5.8 x 0.9 in 0.8 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » Historical Food and Cooking
Education » Writing
Engineering » Home Construction » Sustainable Living
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
Home and Garden » Sustainable Living » General
Science and Mathematics » Agriculture » Sustainable Living

The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home: The Happy Luddite's Guide to Self-Sufficiency New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$23.00 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Perigee Books - English 9780399537776 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Albala and Henderson follow up their The Lost Art of Real Cooking with an utterly charming collection of recipes and how-tos for the 21st-century hipster homemaker. Like postmodern Elizabeth Davids, they augment their own recipes with obscure, intriguing ones from earlier centuries, such as Apicius's fourth-century Apricot Minutal, which stews up the fruit with spices and garum, an ancient fish sauce. The book consists mostly of recipes — albeit for unusual, slow-food, and occasionally bizarre dishes such as injera (Ethiopian sourdough pancakes), liverwurst, thousand-year-old eggs ('among the scariest things I have ever tried at home'), kombucha, and butter sauce with ambergris (yes, the 'waxy glob that forms in the intestines of sperm whales, which they barf up') — but, like a quirky updated 1896 Fannie Farmer cookbook, it also includes eccentric but usable household hints and instructions, from soap-making to pounding a ring out of an old silver quarter (using an expedited method invented by Henderson's father). A fun gift for any curious reader, the book is a must-have for makers and urban homesteaders." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home is not about extreme, off-the-grid living. It’s for city and suburban dwellers with day jobs: people who love to cook, love fresh natural ingredients, and old techniques for preservation; people who like doing things themselves with a needle and thread, garden hoe, or manual saw.

Ken Albala and Rosanna Nafziger Henderson spread the spirit of antiquated self-sufficiency throughout the household. They offer projects that are decidedly unplugged and a little daring, including:

* Home building projects like rooftop food dehydrators and wood-burning ovens

* Homemaking essentials, from sewing and quilting to rug braiding and soap making

* The wonders of grain: making croissants by hand, sprouting grains, and baking bread

* Adventures with meat: pickled pig’s feet, homemade liverwurst, and celery-cured salami

Intended for industrious cooks and crafters who aren’t afraid to roll up their sleeves, The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home will teach you the history and how-to on projects for every facet of your home, all without the electric toys that take away from the experience of making things by hand.

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