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Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the On-Going Struggle to Protect Workers' Health

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Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the On-Going Struggle to Protect Workers' Health Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

During the Depression, silicosis, an industrial lung disease, emerged as a national social crisis. Experts estimated that hundreds of thousands of workers were at risk of disease, disability, and death by inhaling silica in mines, foundries, and quarries. By the 1950s, however, silicosis was nearly forgotten by the media and health professionals. Asking what makes a health threat a public issue, David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz examine how a culture defines disease and how disease itself is understood at different moments in history. They also explore the interlocking relationships of public health, labor, business, and government to discuss who should assume responsibility for occupational disease.

Back Cover

 

“If there is a paradigmatic tale of occupational health . . . Deadly Dust is it.”

—James L. Weeks, Science

 

“Rosner and Markowitz have produced a carefully crafted history of the rise and fall of this occupational disease, focusing especially on the political forces behind changing disease definitions. . . Deadly Dust comes as a fresh breeze into one of the more stuffy and too often ignored alleys of medical history.”

—Robert N. Proctor, The Journal of the American Medical Association

 

“A thought-provoking, densely referenced, uncompromising history. . . Like all good history, it challenges our basic assumptions about how the world is ordered and offers both factual information and a conceptual framework for rethinking what we ‘know.”

—Rosemary K. Sokas, The New England Journal of Medicine

Back Cover continued

Deadly Dust raises an important methodological problem that has long gone underarticulated in medical historical circles: how can social historians of medicine offer political or economic explanations for the scientific efforts of their professional subjects without losing a grip on the biological aspects of disease?”

—Christopher Sellers, The Journal of the History of Medicine

 

"A sophisticated understanding of how class and conflict shape social, economic, political, and intellectual change underlies this first attempt at a history of occupational health spanning the twentieth century."

—Claudia Clark, The Journal of American History%; FONT-FAMILY: Arial" 

"This volume is well worth reading as a significant contribution to American social history."

—Charles O. Jackson, The American Historical Review

 

David Rosner is Distinguished Professor of History and Sociomedical Sciences, and Director of the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health, Columbia University.

 

Gerald Markowitz is Professor of History at John Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York.

Synopsis:

During the Depression, silicosis, and industrial lung disease, emerged as a national social crisis. Experts estimated that hundreds of thousands of workers were at risk of disease, disability, and death by inhaling silica in mines, foundries, and quarries. By the 1950s, however, silicosis was nearly forgotten by the media and health professionals.

Synopsis:

During the Depression, silicosis, an industrial lung disease, emerged as a national social crisis. Experts estimated that hundreds of thousands of workers were at risk of disease, disability, and death by inhaling silica in mines, foundries, and quarries. By the 1950s, however, silicosis was nearly forgotten by the media and health professionals. Asking what makes a health threat a public issue, David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz examine how a culture defines disease and how disease itself is understood at different moments in history. They also consider who should assume responsibility for occupational disease.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780472031108
Author:
Rosner, David
Publisher:
University of Michigan Press
Author:
Markowitz, Gerald
Subject:
Public Health
Subject:
History
Subject:
United states
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Pulmonary & Thoracic Medicine
Subject:
Occupational & Industrial Medicine
Subject:
Occupational diseases
Subject:
Silicosis -- United States.
Subject:
Occupational diseases -- Social aspects.
Subject:
Health and Medicine-Medical Specialties
Edition Description:
New and expanded edition
Series:
Conversations in Medicine and Society
Publication Date:
20051031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
12 B&W photographs, 2 tables
Pages:
280
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » General

Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the On-Going Struggle to Protect Workers' Health New Trade Paper
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Product details 280 pages University of Michigan Press - English 9780472031108 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , During the Depression, silicosis, and industrial lung disease, emerged as a national social crisis. Experts estimated that hundreds of thousands of workers were at risk of disease, disability, and death by inhaling silica in mines, foundries, and quarries. By the 1950s, however, silicosis was nearly forgotten by the media and health professionals.
"Synopsis" by , During the Depression, silicosis, an industrial lung disease, emerged as a national social crisis. Experts estimated that hundreds of thousands of workers were at risk of disease, disability, and death by inhaling silica in mines, foundries, and quarries. By the 1950s, however, silicosis was nearly forgotten by the media and health professionals. Asking what makes a health threat a public issue, David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz examine how a culture defines disease and how disease itself is understood at different moments in history. They also consider who should assume responsibility for occupational disease.
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