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Tree of Rivers: The Story of the Amazon

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Tree of Rivers: The Story of the Amazon Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A history of the Amazon, its peoples, and those who have explored the river by an author with unsurpassed knowledge and experience in the region.

By far the world's largest river, the Amazon flows through the greatest expanse of tropical rain forest on earth. Human beings settled in Amazonia ten thousand years ago and learned to live well on its bounty. Europeans first saw the Amazon around 1500 and started settling there in the seventeenth century. Always in fear or awe of the jungle, they tried in vain to introduce crops and livestock.

John Hemming's account of the river and its history is full of the larger-than-life personalities this unique environment attracted: explorers, missionaries, and naturalists among them. By the nineteenth century, Amazonian natives had almost been destroyed by alien diseases and slavery, as well as violent class rebellion. Although the rubber industry created huge fortunes, it too was at a fearful cost in human misery.

In the last hundred years, the Amazon has seen intrepid explorers, entrepreneurial millionaires, and political extremists taking refuge in jungle retreats. Alongside them, natural scientists, anthropologists, and archaeologists have sought to discover the secrets of this mighty habitat.

Today, the world's appetite for timber, beef, and soya is destroying this great tropical forest. Hemming explains why the Amazon is environmentally crucial to survival and brilliantly describes the passionate struggles to exploit and to protect it. 70 illustrations, 20 in color.

Review:

In "Atlas", a book about travel, Jorge Luis Borges wrote that we should not assume all discoveries and explorations to be things of the past. No place can justify this assertion more literally than the Amazon basin. Dominated by the longest river in the world, its geography extends over a surface the size of Europe, much of it inaccessible.

The river is the center of a web of life... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

A history of the Amazon, its peoples, and those who have explored the river by an author with unsurpassed knowledge and experience in the region

Synopsis:

By far the world's largest river, the Amazon flows through the greatest expanse of tropical rain forest on earth. Human beings settled in Amazonia ten thousand years ago and learned to live well on its bounty. Europeans first saw the Amazon around 1500 and started settling there in the seventeenth century. Always in fear or awe of the jungle, they tried in vain to introduce crops and livestock.

John Hemming's account of the river and its history is full of larger-than-life personalities this unique environment attracted: explorers, missionaries, and naturalists among them. By the nineteenth century, Amazonian natives had almost been destroyed by alien diseases and slavery, as well as violent class rebellion. Although the rubber industry created huge fortunes, it too was at a fearful cost in human misery.

In the last hundred years, the Amazon has seen intrepid explorers, entreprenurial millionaires, and political extremists taking refuge in jungle retreats. Alongside them, natural scientists, anthropologists, and archaeologists have sought to discover the secrets of this mighty habitat.

Today, the world's appetite for timber, beef, and soya is destroying this great tropical forest. Hemming explains why the Amazon is environmentally crucial to survival and brilliantly describes the passionate struggles to exploit and protect it.

About the Author

John Hemming was Director of the Royal Geographical Society, London, 1975-1996. His previous books include the prize-winning The Conquest of the Incas and a trilogy on the Brazilian Indians.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780500514016
Author:
Hemming, John
Publisher:
Thames & Hudson
Subject:
Rivers
Subject:
History
Subject:
Amazon River Region
Subject:
Latin America - South America
Subject:
Amazon River Region History.
Subject:
Ecosystems & Habitats - Rivers
Subject:
Nature Studies-Biology
Publication Date:
20080531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
9 x 7 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Latin America » South America
History and Social Science » World History » General
History and Social Science » World History » South America
Home and Garden » Interior Design » General
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Biology

Tree of Rivers: The Story of the Amazon New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$36.25 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Thames & Hudson - English 9780500514016 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A history of the Amazon, its peoples, and those who have explored the river by an author with unsurpassed knowledge and experience in the region
"Synopsis" by , By far the world's largest river, the Amazon flows through the greatest expanse of tropical rain forest on earth. Human beings settled in Amazonia ten thousand years ago and learned to live well on its bounty. Europeans first saw the Amazon around 1500 and started settling there in the seventeenth century. Always in fear or awe of the jungle, they tried in vain to introduce crops and livestock.

John Hemming's account of the river and its history is full of larger-than-life personalities this unique environment attracted: explorers, missionaries, and naturalists among them. By the nineteenth century, Amazonian natives had almost been destroyed by alien diseases and slavery, as well as violent class rebellion. Although the rubber industry created huge fortunes, it too was at a fearful cost in human misery.

In the last hundred years, the Amazon has seen intrepid explorers, entreprenurial millionaires, and political extremists taking refuge in jungle retreats. Alongside them, natural scientists, anthropologists, and archaeologists have sought to discover the secrets of this mighty habitat.

Today, the world's appetite for timber, beef, and soya is destroying this great tropical forest. Hemming explains why the Amazon is environmentally crucial to survival and brilliantly describes the passionate struggles to exploit and protect it.

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