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This title in other editions

Learning to Go to School in Japan

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Learning to Go to School in Japan Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

When we look beyond lesson planning and curriculaand#151;those explicit facets that comprise so much of our discussion about educationand#151;we remember that teaching is an inherently social activity, shaped by a rich array of implicit habits, comportments, and ways of communicating. This is as true in the United States as it is in Japan, where Akiko Hayashi and Joseph Tobin have long studied early education from a cross-cultural perspective. Taking readers inside the classrooms of Japanese preschools, Teaching Embodied explores the everyday, implicit behaviors that form a crucially importantand#151;but grossly understudiedand#151;aspect of educational practice.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

Akiko Hayashi and Joseph Tobin embed themselves in the classrooms of three different teachers at three different schools to examine how teachers act, think, and talk. Drawing on extended interviews, their own real-time observations, and hours of video footage, they focus on how teachers embody their lessons: how they use their hands to gesture, comfort, or discipline; how they direct their posture, gaze, or physical location to indicate degrees of attention; and how they use the tone of their voice to communicate empathy, frustration, disapproval, or enthusiasm. Comparing teachers across schools and over time, they offer an illuminating analysis of the gestures that comprise a total body language, something that, while hardly ever explicitly discussed, the teachers all share to a remarkable degree. Showcasing the tremendous importance ofand#151;and dearth of attention toand#151;this body language, they offer a powerful new inroad into educational study and practice, a deeper understanding of how teaching actually works, no matter what culture or country it is being practiced in.and#160;

Synopsis:

Japanese two-year-olds are indulged, dependent, and undisciplined toddlers, but by the age of six they have become obedient, self-reliant, and cooperative students. When Lois Peak traveled to Japan in search of the "magical childrearing technique" behind this transformation, she discovered that the answer lies not in the family but in the preschool, where teachers gently train their pupils in proper group behavior. Using case studies drawn from two contrasting schools, Peak documents the important early stages of socialization in Japanese culture.

Contrary to popular perceptions, Japanese preschools are play-centered environments that pay little attention to academic preparation. It is here that Japanese children learn their first lessons in group life. The primary goal of these cheerful--even boisterous--settings is not to teach academic facts of learning-readiness skills but to inculcate behavior and attitudes appropriate to life in public social situations.

Peak compares the behavior considered permissible at home with that required of children at preschool, and argues that the teacher is expected to be the primary agent in the child's transition. Step by step, she brings the socialization process to life, through a skillful combination of classroom observations, interviews with mothers and teachers, transcripts of classroom events, and quotations from Japanese professional literature.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. 201-204) and index.

About the Author

Akiko Hayashi is a postdoctoral fellow in education at the University of Georgia.

Joseph Tobin is professor of early childhood education at the University of Georgia and the author of several books, including Preschool in Three Cultures Revisited, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780520083875
Author:
Peak, Lois
Publisher:
University of California Press
Author:
Hayashi, Akiko
Author:
Tobin, Joseph
Location:
Berkeley :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Child Development
Subject:
Home and school
Subject:
Preschool & Kindergarten
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Education and guidance
Subject:
Child rearing
Subject:
Education, preschool
Subject:
Nursery schools
Subject:
Home and school -- Japan.
Subject:
Anthropology - General
Subject:
Education (Early childhood)
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series Volume:
101-394
Publication Date:
19931031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
189 halftones
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

Education » Early Childhood
Education » General
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » General
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Asia » Japan » Contemporary 1945 to Present

Learning to Go to School in Japan New Trade Paper
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$38.50 In Stock
Product details 224 pages University of California Press - English 9780520083875 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Japanese two-year-olds are indulged, dependent, and undisciplined toddlers, but by the age of six they have become obedient, self-reliant, and cooperative students. When Lois Peak traveled to Japan in search of the "magical childrearing technique" behind this transformation, she discovered that the answer lies not in the family but in the preschool, where teachers gently train their pupils in proper group behavior. Using case studies drawn from two contrasting schools, Peak documents the important early stages of socialization in Japanese culture.

Contrary to popular perceptions, Japanese preschools are play-centered environments that pay little attention to academic preparation. It is here that Japanese children learn their first lessons in group life. The primary goal of these cheerful--even boisterous--settings is not to teach academic facts of learning-readiness skills but to inculcate behavior and attitudes appropriate to life in public social situations.

Peak compares the behavior considered permissible at home with that required of children at preschool, and argues that the teacher is expected to be the primary agent in the child's transition. Step by step, she brings the socialization process to life, through a skillful combination of classroom observations, interviews with mothers and teachers, transcripts of classroom events, and quotations from Japanese professional literature.

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