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The Cambridge Companion to Roman Satire (Cambridge Companions to Literature)

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The Cambridge Companion to Roman Satire (Cambridge Companions to Literature) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Satire as a distinct genre of writing was first developed by the Romans in the second century BCE. Regarded by them as uniquely 'their own', satire held a special place in the Roman imagination as the one genre that could address the problems of city life from the perspective of a 'real Roman'. In this Cambridge Companion an international team of scholars provides a stimulating introduction to Roman satire's core practitioners and practices, placing them within the contexts of Greco-Roman literary and political history. Besides addressing basic questions of authors, content, and form, the volume looks to the question of what satire 'does' within the world of Greco-Roman social exchanges, and goes on to treat the genre's further development, reception, and translation in Elizabethan England and beyond. Included are studies of the prosimetric, 'Menippean' satires that would become the models of Rabelais, Erasmus, More, and (narrative satire's crowning jewel) Swift.

Book News Annotation:

European, US, and Australian scholars provide a guidebook to the various regions, topographical contours, and final frontier of the genre for readers embarking on an expedition into it, especially those who do not know the language. They cover satire as literature and as social discourse, and the influence of Roman satire in English literature. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

Satire as a genre was first developed by the Romans and regarded as completely 'their own'. In this Companion a leading international cast of contributors provides a stimulating introduction aimed particularly at non-specialists. Satires' generic and literary features are explored, as well as their role as social discourse and reception.

Synopsis:

Satire was first developed by the Romans in the second century BCE and was regarded as the one genre that could address the problems of city life from the perspective of a 'real Roman'. In this work an international team of scholars provides a stimulating introduction to Roman satire's practices, placing it within the contexts of literary and political history. Besides examining authors, content, and form, the volume discusses what satire 'does' within the world of Greco-Roman social exchanges, and explores the genre's development, reception, and translation in later periods.

Synopsis:

Explores the development of Roman satire in antiquity and of its reception in later centuries.

Synopsis:

Satire as a distinct genre was first developed by the Romans and regarded as completely 'their own'. This Companion's international contributors provide a stimulating introduction to the genre and its individual proponents aimed particularly at non-specialists. Roman satires are explored both as generic, literary phenomena and as highly symbolic and effective social activities. Satire's transformation in late antiquity and reception in more recent centuries is also covered.

About the Author

Kirk Freudenburg is Professor of Latin and Chair of the Department of the Classics at the University of Illinois. His previous publications include The Walking Muse: Horace and the Theory of Satire (Princeton University Press, 1993) and Satires of Rome: Threatening Poses from Lucilius to Juvenal (Cambridge University Press, 2001).

Table of Contents

Introduction: posing for the companion: Roman satire Kirk Freudenburg; Part I. Satire as Literature: 1. Rome's first 'satirists': themes and genre in Ennius and Lucilius Frances Muecke; 2. The restless companion: Horace, Satires 1 and 2 Emily Gowers; 3. Speaking from silence: the Stoic paradoxes of Persius Andrea Cucchiarelli; 4. The poor man's feast: Juvenal Victoria Rimell; 5. Citation and authority in Seneca's Apocolocyntosis Ellen O'Gorman; 6. Late arrivals: Julian and Boethius Joel Relihan; 7. From turnips to turbot: epic allusion in Roman satire Catherine Connors; 8. Sleeping with the enemy: satire and philosophy Roland Mayer; 9. The satiric maze: Petronius, satire and the novel Victoria Rimell; Part II. Satire as Social Discourse: 10. Satire as aristocratic play Thomas Habinek; 11. Satire in a ritual context Fritz Graf; 12. Satire and the poet: the body as self-referential symbol Alessandro Barchiesi and Andrea Cucchiarelli; 13. The libidinal rhetoric of satire Erik Gunderson; 14. Roman satire in the sixteenth century Colin Burrow; 15. Alluding to satire: Rochester, Dryden, and others Dan Hooley; 16. The Horatian and the Juvenalesque in English letters Charles Martindale; 17. The 'presence' of Roman satire: modern receptions and their interpretative implications Duncan Kennedy; Conclusion: The turnaround: a volume retrospect on Roman satires John Henderson.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780521006279
Editor:
Freudenburg, Kirk
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Editor:
Freudenburg, Kirk
Editor:
Kirk, Freudenburg
Author:
Freudenburg, Kirk
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Reference
Subject:
Ancient and Classical
Subject:
Rome
Subject:
Satire, latin
Subject:
General Language Arts & Disciplines
Subject:
Rome in literature
Subject:
Satire, Latin -- History and criticism.
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Ancient, Classical & Medieval
Edition Number:
1
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Cambridge Companions to Literature
Publication Date:
20050531
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
1 b/w illus.
Pages:
374
Dimensions:
9.02x6.08x.90 in. 1.30 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Classics » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General

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Product details 374 pages Cambridge University Press - English 9780521006279 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Satire as a genre was first developed by the Romans and regarded as completely 'their own'. In this Companion a leading international cast of contributors provides a stimulating introduction aimed particularly at non-specialists. Satires' generic and literary features are explored, as well as their role as social discourse and reception.
"Synopsis" by , Satire was first developed by the Romans in the second century BCE and was regarded as the one genre that could address the problems of city life from the perspective of a 'real Roman'. In this work an international team of scholars provides a stimulating introduction to Roman satire's practices, placing it within the contexts of literary and political history. Besides examining authors, content, and form, the volume discusses what satire 'does' within the world of Greco-Roman social exchanges, and explores the genre's development, reception, and translation in later periods.
"Synopsis" by , Explores the development of Roman satire in antiquity and of its reception in later centuries.
"Synopsis" by , Satire as a distinct genre was first developed by the Romans and regarded as completely 'their own'. This Companion's international contributors provide a stimulating introduction to the genre and its individual proponents aimed particularly at non-specialists. Roman satires are explored both as generic, literary phenomena and as highly symbolic and effective social activities. Satire's transformation in late antiquity and reception in more recent centuries is also covered.
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