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Other titles in the Cambridge Studies in the History of Medicine series:

The Colonial Disease: A Social History of Sleeping Sickness in Northern Zaire, 1900-1940

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The Colonial Disease: A Social History of Sleeping Sickness in Northern Zaire, 1900-1940 Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

This is a study of the early colonial history of Zaire (formerly the Belgian Congo), with special emphasis on disease and medicine. Using the example of sleeping sickness epidemics, Dr. Lyons discusses the ways that Western medicine and its practitioners came in conflict with African ideas and health practices. It is the author's contention that while the Europeans had brought scientific inquiry and Western bio-medicine to Africa, they had also introduced a harsh, repressive political system coupled with a ruthlessly exploitative economic system that led to the introduction of new diseases and the exacerbation of those already present. Sleeping sickness captured the colonial imagination to such an extent that it continued to dominate medical attention for decades, to independence and beyond. This case study in the social history of the disease and its treatment in early colonial Africa suggests that the "colonial disease" and its impact was a consequence of the Western civilizing mission.

Synopsis:

A case-study in the history of sleeping sickness, relating it to the western 'civilising mission'.

Synopsis:

A case-study in the history of sleeping sickness, relating it to the western 'civilising mission'.

Synopsis:

This book examines the ways in which western medicine and its practitioners came into conflict with African ideas and health practices. It is the author's contention that while the Europeans had brought scientific enquiry and western bio-medicine to Africa, they had also introduced a harsh, repressive political system which, coupled with a ruthlessly exploitative economic system, led to the introduction of new diseases and the exacerbation of those already present. This case-study in the social history of the disease and its treatment in early colonial Africa suggests that the 'colonial disease' and its impact was in effect a consequence of the western 'civilising mission'.

Synopsis:

The Congolese people termed sleeping sickness the 'colonial disease'. This study examines why Belgian colonisation of the Congo, rather than benefiting the local population, exacerbated many diseases.

Synopsis:

The Belgians commonly referred to their colonisation of the Congo as a 'civilising mission', and many regarded the introduction of western bio-medicine as a central feature of their 'gift' to Africans. By 1930, however, it was clear that some features of their 'civilising mission' were in fact closely connected to the poor health of many of the Congolese. The Europeans had indeed brought scientific enquiry and western bio-medicine; but they had also introduced a harsh, repressive political system which, coupled with a ruthlessly exploitative economic system, led to the introduction of new diseases while already-existing diseases were exacerbated and spread. Tropical, or 'colonial', medicine was a new field at the turn of the century, linked closely both to European expansionism and human trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness. In 1901 a devastating epidemic had erupted in Uganda, killing well over 250,000 people.

Table of Contents

List of maps; List of plates; List of tables; Preface; List of abbreviations; 1. Disease and medicine in the history of Africa; 2. From private empire to public colony; 3. Mise en valeur: economic exploitation; 4. Epidemiology and ecology of human sleeping sickness; 5. 'The lure of the exotic': sleeping sickness, tropical medicine and imperialism; 6. Discovery: Liverpool scientists in the Congo; 7. The campaign, part one: sleeping sickness and social medicine; 8. The campaign, part two: the surveys and tensions; 9. The African response; 10. Public health, social engineering and African lives; 11. Conclusion and legacy; Appendices; Notes; Select Bibliography; Index.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780521524520
Editor:
Rosenberg, Charles
Editor:
Jones, Colin
Editor:
Rosenberg, Charles
Editor:
Jones, Colin
Author:
Rosenberg, Charles
Author:
Maryinez, Lyons
Author:
Lyons, Maryinez
Author:
Jones, Colin
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
History
Subject:
Health and Medicine-Medical Specialties
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Cambridge Studies in the History of Medicine
Publication Date:
20020431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Illustrations:
22 b/w illus.
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9.00x6.04x.88 in. 1.17 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » History of Medicine
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » Africa » Congo
History and Social Science » World History » General

The Colonial Disease: A Social History of Sleeping Sickness in Northern Zaire, 1900-1940 New Trade Paper
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Product details 352 pages Cambridge University Press - English 9780521524520 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A case-study in the history of sleeping sickness, relating it to the western 'civilising mission'.
"Synopsis" by , A case-study in the history of sleeping sickness, relating it to the western 'civilising mission'.
"Synopsis" by , This book examines the ways in which western medicine and its practitioners came into conflict with African ideas and health practices. It is the author's contention that while the Europeans had brought scientific enquiry and western bio-medicine to Africa, they had also introduced a harsh, repressive political system which, coupled with a ruthlessly exploitative economic system, led to the introduction of new diseases and the exacerbation of those already present. This case-study in the social history of the disease and its treatment in early colonial Africa suggests that the 'colonial disease' and its impact was in effect a consequence of the western 'civilising mission'.
"Synopsis" by , The Congolese people termed sleeping sickness the 'colonial disease'. This study examines why Belgian colonisation of the Congo, rather than benefiting the local population, exacerbated many diseases.
"Synopsis" by , The Belgians commonly referred to their colonisation of the Congo as a 'civilising mission', and many regarded the introduction of western bio-medicine as a central feature of their 'gift' to Africans. By 1930, however, it was clear that some features of their 'civilising mission' were in fact closely connected to the poor health of many of the Congolese. The Europeans had indeed brought scientific enquiry and western bio-medicine; but they had also introduced a harsh, repressive political system which, coupled with a ruthlessly exploitative economic system, led to the introduction of new diseases while already-existing diseases were exacerbated and spread. Tropical, or 'colonial', medicine was a new field at the turn of the century, linked closely both to European expansionism and human trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness. In 1901 a devastating epidemic had erupted in Uganda, killing well over 250,000 people.
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