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Other titles in the Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture series:

Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture #29: Physiognomy and the Meaning of Expression in Nineteenth-Century Culture

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Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture #29: Physiognomy and the Meaning of Expression in Nineteenth-Century Culture Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In Physiognomy and the Meaning of Expression in Nineteenth-Century Culture, Lucy Hartley examines the emergence of physiognomy as a form of popular science. Physiognomy posited an understanding of the inner meaning of human character from observations of physical appearances, usually facial expressions. Taking the physiognomical teachings of Johann Caspar Lavater as a starting-point, Hartley considers the extent to which attempts to read the mind and judge the character through expression can provide descriptions of human nature.

Synopsis:

Starting with the physiognomical teachings of Johann Caspar Lavater, Lucy Hartley assesses the significance of the physiognomical tradition to Charles Bell and the Pre-Raphaelites and the new doctrines espoused by Alexander Bain and Herbert Spencer. She demonstrates how the evolutionary explanation of expression proposed by Spencer and Darwin is both the outcome of this tradition and the reason for its dissolution.

Synopsis:

In this study of the emergence of physiognomy as a form of popular science, Lucy Hartley starts with the teachings of Johann Caspar Lavater and considers the extent to which attempts to read the mind and judge character through expression can provide descriptions of human nature. After assessing the significance of the physiognomical tradition to Charles Bell and the Pre-Raphaelites and the new doctrines espoused by Alexander Bain and Herbert Spencer, she demonstrates how the evolutionary explanation of expression proposed by Spencer and Darwin is both the outcome of this tradition and the reason for its dissolution.

Synopsis:

This is a study of the emergence of physiognomy as a form of popular science.

Synopsis:

Lucy Hartley examines the emergence of physiognomy as a form of popular science.

About the Author

Lucy Hartley is Lecturer in English at the University of Southampton.

Table of Contents

Illustrations; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1. A science of mind?: theories of nature, theories of man; 2. The argument for expression: Charles Bell and the concept of design; 3. What is the character: the nature of ordinariness in the paintings of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood; 4. ‘Beauty of character and beauty of aspect’: expression, feeling, and the contemplation of emotion; 5. Universal expressions: Darwin and the naturalisation of emotion; 6. The promise of a new psychology?; Bibliography; Index.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780521792721
Author:
Hartley, Lucy M.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Editor:
Beer, Gillian
Author:
Hartley, Lucy
Author:
Beer, Gillian
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Subject:
Expression
Subject:
Physiognomy
Subject:
Facial expression
Subject:
History of Medicine, 19th Cent.
Subject:
Physiognomy - Great Britain - History -
Subject:
Expression - Great Britain - History -
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
General
Subject:
Europe - Great Britain - General
Subject:
anthropology;cultural anthropology
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series:
Cambridge studies in nineteenth-century literature and culture ;
Series Volume:
IMS-1429
Publication Date:
20120331
Binding:
Hardcover
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
256

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Europe » Great Britain » General History
History and Social Science » World History » England » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Metaphysics » General
Metaphysics » Phrenology
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General

Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture #29: Physiognomy and the Meaning of Expression in Nineteenth-Century Culture New Hardcover
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Product details 256 pages Cambridge University Press - English 9780521792721 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Starting with the physiognomical teachings of Johann Caspar Lavater, Lucy Hartley assesses the significance of the physiognomical tradition to Charles Bell and the Pre-Raphaelites and the new doctrines espoused by Alexander Bain and Herbert Spencer. She demonstrates how the evolutionary explanation of expression proposed by Spencer and Darwin is both the outcome of this tradition and the reason for its dissolution.
"Synopsis" by , In this study of the emergence of physiognomy as a form of popular science, Lucy Hartley starts with the teachings of Johann Caspar Lavater and considers the extent to which attempts to read the mind and judge character through expression can provide descriptions of human nature. After assessing the significance of the physiognomical tradition to Charles Bell and the Pre-Raphaelites and the new doctrines espoused by Alexander Bain and Herbert Spencer, she demonstrates how the evolutionary explanation of expression proposed by Spencer and Darwin is both the outcome of this tradition and the reason for its dissolution.
"Synopsis" by , This is a study of the emergence of physiognomy as a form of popular science.
"Synopsis" by , Lucy Hartley examines the emergence of physiognomy as a form of popular science.
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