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25 Remote Warehouse Children's- Historical Fiction- U.S. 20th Century

My Vicksburg

by

My Vicksburg Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

It's 1900, the dawn of a new century, and fifteen-year-old Rose Frampton is beginning a new life. She's left her family in South Carolina to live with her handsome and wealthy husband in Brooklyn, New York--a move that is both scary and exciting. As mistress of the large Victorian estate on Dorchester Road, she must learn to make decisions, establish her independence, and run an efficient household. These tasks are difficult enough without the added complication of barely knowing her husband. As romance blossoms and Rose begins to find her place, she discovers that strength of character does not come easily but is essential for happiness.

Writing in diary form, Ann Rinaldi paints a sensual picture of time and place--and gives readers an intimate glimpse into the heart of a child as she becomes a woman.

Includes a reader's guide.

The joys, heartaches, fears, and struggles of a young Southern woman trying to make a place for herself in the land of Yankees.

"Rinaldi describes the teen's first year of marriage with grace, tact, and sensitivity."--School Library Journal

"Fans of romance will be swept up."--Publishers Weekly

ANN RINALDI is an award-winning author best known for bringing history vividly to life. She lives in central New Jersey.

December 16, 1899

MY BIRTHDAY. Why does one feel so special on her birthday, as if something is about to happen? I received many lovely presents, including this gilt-edged journal book from Daddy. The pages are creamy white and just waiting for my words. They even smell nice, as if they are scented. I'm so excited about it. More excited than I am over the new Gibson Girl shirtwaist Mama gave me or the hair ribbons from my sister.

I'm writing in my new journal this very moment. What shall I say? What could possibly be good enough about my silly old dull life to put down in here?

It is a cold, drizzly day with rain. Some workers are ginning cotton and others are killing the last of the beef. Daddy sold a pair of turkeys to old Mrs. Lewis for a dollar and fifty cents. Oh, this is all so ordinary! But Mama says everything is worth setting down, that someday my granddaughter may read this. Ho! Me with a granddaughter! Imagine!

Here is something worth noting. The Gullah people who live and work around here believe that when you die your soul goes to God but your spirit stays on earth and takes part in all the activities of your people. I like that part of their belief. If I died of a sudden, I'd like my spirit to stay here.

Well, I'm not dying, at least I don't plan to yet, but Daddy talks constantly these days about sending me to school in the North, where I would get a proper American education.

Imagine that! Yankee land. And his own uncle Sumner killed at Chancellorsville!

"North is the only place you have chances," Daddy says. "The chances are all done around here."

Chances for what? I want to ask. But I know he'd say, "To marry the right person." He wants me to wed somebody with money. "Even though that person is a Yankee?" I'd ask. To which he'd say, "The only ones who have money are the Yankees."

This family has had such a problem with money since the war ended thirty-five years ago.

I know one thing. I'm not ever going north. I'm staying right here on Saint Helena's Island. Why, Daddy was only able to buy the house back the year I was born. I know he spent most of his money restoring it to what it was before the war and hasn't got much to dower me with. But I've only just turned fifteen, and he's doing well with the cotton and the horses. We have the best horse farm in the county. And how could I leave here, anyway?

I know another thing, too. If I ever do go away, I'm going to leave my spirit here to help my family. Like the Gullah people do when they die.

~

MAYBE I OUGHT to get things down right, if I'm going to keep this as a proper journal. The house I sit in, the very room I sit in, is on Saint Helena's Island, off the coast of South Carolina. I'm so used to this place I think everyone should know of it. Certainly they should, upon second thought. Wouldn't it be wonderful if everyone lived in a house made of a strong tabby foundation with a double piazza held up by great pillars and a front yard that sloped down to the water? If everyone could hear the wind in the palmetto trees and taste the sand in their mouths when the wind blew? And what about the tides that flow toward land twice each day, then back out again?

To say nothing of the wild ducks and the swampy lands and the cypress trees, the longleaf pine. And the sea oats on the sand dunes that keep the sand from being washed away.

This house I sit in was built years ago by my great-grandfather. My grandparents lost it when General Sherman came through and burned a lot of the homes around here. The white owners were driven away. But General Sherman left this house and a few others standing so the Negroes could live in them and work the land. Then Yankee agents went from plantation to plantation and took the cotton and shipped it north.

My Grandfather Frampton had to go to work as a teacher in the Freedman's School here on the island because he was so destitute after the war. I recollect Grandmother Frampton telling us, before she died, how he looked of a morning when he would get ready to go to work, this wonderful gentleman who'd once been rich and owned dozens of slaves. How she'd hear him early in the morning in the kitchen, getting his own lunch pail ready and moving about quietly. How she couldn't get up to help him for fear of embarrassing him. And how he'd go off, day after day, like a common workingman to earn his living. They were living in a log cabin on the island then, even though this house was still standing. He made sixty dollars a month. Grandmother Frampton couldn't abide seeing him so demeaned, so she started making pies. Not sweet potato and pecan like they do hereabouts, but fruit and cream like they do up north, since that was where she came from. And soon they had to hire people to help her because the pies sold so fast. She made a fortune, so Grandfather didn't have to teach anymore. And that fortune they left to Daddy, who was able to buy this place back for the family. I'm so proud of him for doing that.

Now my daddy grows his cotton again. And breeds his horses. Right now we have thirteen mares and two stallions, and five two-year-olds to be broken to the saddle and bridle before they get shipped to Lexington for the horse auctions.

The pie business is sold. And we're well-off. But still Daddy wants me to go north to school. We have relatives in Connecticut, from Grandmother's connections.

Oh, sometimes the future frightens me so much, I don't want to grow up. I want to be a young girl forever. But I do have opinions. We were brought up in this family to have opinions, but Mama says a proper young lady shouldn't voice hers too loudly or her husband will think her forward and brash. And so I am forward and brash. My husband will just have to abide that in me.

Copyright and#169; 2005 by Ann Rinaldi

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Requests for permission to make copies of any part of the work should be mailed to the following address: Permissions Department, Harcourt, Inc., 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, Florida 32887-6777.

"Wouldn't it be wonderful if everyone lived in a house made of a strong Tabby foundation with a double piazza held up by great pillars and a front yard that sloped down to the water? If everyone cold hear the wind in the palmetto trees and taste the sand in their mouths when the wind blew? And what about the tides that flow toward land twice each day, then back out again?"

It's 1900--the dawn of a new century--and never in her wildest dreams did fifteen-year-old Rose Frampton ever think she'd leave behind her family and home on the peaceful shores of her island plantation in South Carolina...especially not to live with a new husband in the land of Yankees.

But she is doing just that. Rose's new life with her handsome and wealthy husband in Brooklyn, New York is both scary and exciting. As mistress of the large Victorian estate on Dorchester Road, she must learn to make decisions, establish her independence, and run an efficient household. These tasks are difficult enough without the added complication that she and her new husband barely know one another. As romance blossoms and Rose begins to find her place, she discovers that strength of character does not come easily but is essential for happiness.

Told in diary form, Ann Rinaldi paints a sensual picture of time and place as readers are given an intimate glimpse into the heart of a child as she grows to become a woman.

Synopsis:

'
Fourteen-year-old Emily Pigbush suspects that her uncle, a respected physician, is involved in body snatching.

\n

'

Synopsis:

'
A fictional account of Phillis Wheatley, the slave who became America\'s first published black poet

\n

'

Synopsis:

A fictional account of Phillis Wheatley, the slave who became America's first published black poet

Synopsis:

Fourteen-year-old Emily Pigbush suspects that her uncle, a respected physician, is involved in body snatching.


Synopsis:

A fictionalized dual biography by one of the premier writers of historical fiction for young readers

Synopsis:

Susanna English desperately wants to join the circle of girls who meet every week at the parsonage, but she doesnt realize the leader of the group, the malicious Ann Putnam, is about to set off a torrent of false accusations that will lead to the imprisonment and execution of countless innocent people-victims of a witch-hunt panic. “The authors skillful manipulation of the conventions of the young-adult novel-particularly the rich exploration of being an outsider and going against the mainstream-makes this book a superb vehicle for examining the social dynamics of this legendary event.”-The Horn Book

Synopsis:

Kidnapped from her home in Senegal and sold as a slave in 1761, a young girl is purchased by the wealthy Wheatley family in Boston. Phillis Wheatley--as she comes to be known--has an eager mind and it leads her on an unusual path for a slave--she becomes Americas first published black poet. “Strong characterization and perceptive realism mark this thoughtful portrayal.”--Booklist

About the Author

ANN RINALDI is an award-winning author best known for bringing history vividly to life. A self-made writer and newspaper columnist for twenty-one years, Ms. Rinaldi attributes her interest in history to her son, who enlisted her to take part in historical reenactments up and down the East Coast. She lives with her husband in central New Jersey.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780547550008
Author:
Rinaldi, Ann
Publisher:
Graphia Books
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
Historical / United States / Revolutionary Periods
Subject:
Historical - United States - 19th Century
Subject:
Historical - United States - General
Subject:
General Juvenile Fiction
Subject:
Historical - United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Girls & Women
Subject:
ographical / United States
Subject:
Children s-Historical Fiction-U.S. 20th Century
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Great Episodes
Series Volume:
The American Revolut
Publication Date:
20110831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 5
Language:
English
Illustrations:
none
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
7 x 4.5 in
Age Level:
from 12

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Related Subjects

Children's » General
Children's » Historical Fiction
Children's » Historical Fiction » United States » 20th Century
Children's » Historical Fiction » United States » Civil War
Children's » Reference » Family and Genealogy

My Vicksburg New Trade Paper
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$11.95 In Stock
Product details 160 pages Graphia Books - English 9780547550008 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , '
Fourteen-year-old Emily Pigbush suspects that her uncle, a respected physician, is involved in body snatching.

\n

'

"Synopsis" by , '
A fictional account of Phillis Wheatley, the slave who became America\'s first published black poet

\n

'

"Synopsis" by ,
A fictional account of Phillis Wheatley, the slave who became America's first published black poet

"Synopsis" by ,
Fourteen-year-old Emily Pigbush suspects that her uncle, a respected physician, is involved in body snatching.


"Synopsis" by ,
A fictionalized dual biography by one of the premier writers of historical fiction for young readers

"Synopsis" by ,
Susanna English desperately wants to join the circle of girls who meet every week at the parsonage, but she doesnt realize the leader of the group, the malicious Ann Putnam, is about to set off a torrent of false accusations that will lead to the imprisonment and execution of countless innocent people-victims of a witch-hunt panic. “The authors skillful manipulation of the conventions of the young-adult novel-particularly the rich exploration of being an outsider and going against the mainstream-makes this book a superb vehicle for examining the social dynamics of this legendary event.”-The Horn Book

"Synopsis" by ,
Kidnapped from her home in Senegal and sold as a slave in 1761, a young girl is purchased by the wealthy Wheatley family in Boston. Phillis Wheatley--as she comes to be known--has an eager mind and it leads her on an unusual path for a slave--she becomes Americas first published black poet. “Strong characterization and perceptive realism mark this thoughtful portrayal.”--Booklist

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