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This title in other editions

Generations of Captivity: A History of African-American Slaves,

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Generations of Captivity: A History of African-American Slaves, Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Ira Berlin traces the history of African-American slavery in the United States from its beginnings in the seventeenth century to its fiery demise nearly three hundred years later.

Most Americans, black and white, have a singular vision of slavery, one fixed in the mid-nineteenth century when most American slaves grew cotton, resided in the deep South, and subscribed to Christianity. Here, however, Berlin offers a dynamic vision, a major reinterpretation in which slaves and their owners continually renegotiated the terms of captivity. Slavery was thus made and remade by successive generations of Africans and African Americans who lived through settlement and adaptation, plantation life, economic transformations, revolution, forced migration, war, and ultimately, emancipation.

Berlin's understanding of the processes that continually transformed the lives of slaves makes Generations of Captivity essential reading for anyone interested in the evolution of antebellum America. Connecting the "Charter Generation" to the development of Atlantic society in the seventeenth century, the "Plantation Generation" to the reconstruction of colonial society in the eighteenth century, the "Revolutionary Generation" to the Age of Revolutions, and the "Migration Generation" to American expansionism in the nineteenth century, Berlin integrates the history of slavery into the larger story of American life. He demonstrates how enslaved black people, by adapting to changing circumstances, prepared for the moment when they could seize liberty and declare themselves the "Freedom Generation."

This epic story, told by a master historian, provides a rich understanding of the experience of African-American slaves, an experience that continues to mobilize American thought and passions today.

Synopsis:

Berlin traces the history of African-American slavery in the United States from its beginnings in the seventeenth century to its fiery demise nearly three hundred years later. Most Americans have a singular vision of slavery, fixed in the mid-nineteenth century when most American slaves grew cotton, resided in the deep South, and subscribed to Christianity. Berlin offers a major reinterpretation in which slavery was made and remade by successive generations of Africans and African Americans who lived through settlement and adaptation, plantation life, economic transformations, revolution, forced migration, war, and ultimately, emancipation.

Synopsis:

2004 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, Nonfiction Category, Cleveland Foundation

Synopsis:

2003 Albert J. Beveridge Award, American Historical Association

About the Author

<>Ira Berlinis Distinguished University Professor at the <>University of Maryland, College Park.

Table of Contents

Prologue: Slavery and Freedom

1. Charter Generations

2. Plantation Generations

3. Revolutionary Generations

4. Migration Generations

Epilogue: Freedom Generations

Tables

Abbreviations

Notes

Acknowledgments

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780674016248
Author:
Berlin, Ira
Publisher:
Belknap Press
Author:
Berlin, IRA
Location:
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Subject:
History
Subject:
United States - General
Subject:
Slavery
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - African American Studies - Histor
Subject:
Slavery -- United States -- History.
Subject:
Slaves -- United States -- History.
Subject:
African American Studies-Black Heritage
Subject:
African American Studies-General
Subject:
History - United States/General
Subject:
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Ethnic Studies/African-American Studies
Subject:
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Discrimination & Race Relations
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
September 2004
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
6 halftones, 5 maps, 2 tables
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1 in

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Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Medical Specialties
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » African American Studies » Slavery and Reconstruction
History and Social Science » Sociology » Slavery
History and Social Science » US History » General

Generations of Captivity: A History of African-American Slaves, New Trade Paper
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$33.25 In Stock
Product details 384 pages Belknap Press - English 9780674016248 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Berlin traces the history of African-American slavery in the United States from its beginnings in the seventeenth century to its fiery demise nearly three hundred years later. Most Americans have a singular vision of slavery, fixed in the mid-nineteenth century when most American slaves grew cotton, resided in the deep South, and subscribed to Christianity. Berlin offers a major reinterpretation in which slavery was made and remade by successive generations of Africans and African Americans who lived through settlement and adaptation, plantation life, economic transformations, revolution, forced migration, war, and ultimately, emancipation.
"Synopsis" by , 2004 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, Nonfiction Category, Cleveland Foundation
"Synopsis" by , 2003 Albert J. Beveridge Award, American Historical Association
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