Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 20, 2014

Julie Schumacher: IMG Dear Professor Fitger



Saint Paul, August 2014 Dear Professor Fitger, I've been asked to say a few words about you for Powells.com. Having dreamed you up with a ball-point... Continue »
  1. $16.07 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Dear Committee Members

    Julie Schumacher 9780385538138

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$85.50
New Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
25 Remote Warehouse Military- World War II General

Nurses in Nazi Germany: Moral Choice in History

by

Nurses in Nazi Germany: Moral Choice in History Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

This book tells the story of German nurses who, directly or indirectly, participated in the Nazis' "euthanasia" measures against patients with mental and physical disabilities, measures that claimed well over 100,000 victims from 1939 to 1945. How could men and women who were trained to care for their patients come to kill or assist in murder or mistreatment? This is the central question pursued by Bronwyn McFarland-Icke as she details the lives of nurses from the beginning of the Weimar Republic through the years of National Socialist rule. Rather than examine what the Party did or did not order, she looks into the hearts and minds of people whose complicity in murder is not easily explained with reference to ideological enthusiasm. Her book is a micro-history in which many of the most important ethical, social, and cultural issues at the core of Nazi genocide can be addressed from a fresh perspective.

McFarland-Icke offers gripping descriptions of the conditions and practices associated with psychiatric nursing during these years by mining such sources as nursing guides, personnel records, and postwar trial testimony. Nurses were expected to be conscientious and friendly caretakers despite job stress, low morale, and Nazi propaganda about patients' having "lives unworthy of living." While some managed to cope with this situation, others became abusive. Asylum administrators meanwhile encouraged nurses to perform with as little disruption and personal commentary as possible. So how did nurses react when ordered to participate in, or tolerate, the murder of their patients? Records suggest that some had no conflicts of conscience; others did as they were told with regret; and a few refused. The remarkable accounts of these nurses enable the author to re-create the drama taking place while sharpening her argument concerning the ability and the willingness to choose.

Synopsis:

This book tells the story of German nurses who, directly or indirectly, participated in the Nazis' "euthanasia" measures against patients with mental and physical disabilities, measures that claimed well over 100,000 victims from 1939 to 1945. How could men and women who were trained to care for their patients come to kill or assist in murder or mistreatment? This is the central question pursued by Bronwyn McFarland-Icke as she details the lives of nurses from the beginning of the Weimar Republic through the years of National Socialist rule. Rather than examine what the Party did or did not order, she looks into the hearts and minds of people whose complicity in murder is not easily explained with reference to ideological enthusiasm. Her book is a micro-history in which many of the most important ethical, social, and cultural issues at the core of Nazi genocide can be addressed from a fresh perspective.

McFarland-Icke offers gripping descriptions of the conditions and practices associated with psychiatric nursing during these years by mining such sources as nursing guides, personnel records, and postwar trial testimony. Nurses were expected to be conscientious and friendly caretakers despite job stress, low morale, and Nazi propaganda about patients' having "lives unworthy of living." While some managed to cope with this situation, others became abusive. Asylum administrators meanwhile encouraged nurses to perform with as little disruption and personal commentary as possible. So how did nurses react when ordered to participate in, or tolerate, the murder of their patients? Records suggest that some had no conflicts of conscience; others did as they were told with regret; and a few refused. The remarkable accounts of these nurses enable the author to re-create the drama taking place while sharpening her argument concerning the ability and the willingness to choose.

Synopsis:

"The descent into mass murder, for ordinary Germans like psychiatric nurses, was for the most part a matter of choices avoided. How the moral senses could be and were blunted by institutions and ideologies on the one hand and by personal subterfuges on the other--this is the subject of McFarland-Icke's careful and painstaking historical recounting and analysis. This is a quiet and watchful book, devoid of the sensationalism that so easily adheres to the subject of mass murder. But for that reason it has a powerful and lasting effect that extends beyond the historic subject matter."--Michael Geyer, University of Chicago

"Thoughtful, sensitive, and revealing, this book brings something new to the discussion of the perpetrators in the Nazi era, particularly those associated with the medical profession. This is history 'from the bottom up' of the very best kind."--Robert Gellately, Strassler Professor in Holocaust History, Clark University

"Nurses in Nazi Germany is bold, meticulously researched, and insightfully argued. Its topic is an important and relatively neglected one. Attracting general readers and scholars alike, the book should have a very long shelf life--not simply as the definitive history of Nazi nursing but as a major contribution to bioethics literature and ethics more broadly."--Robert N. Proctor, Professor of the History of Science, Pennsylvania State University

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [317]-335) and index.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691006659
Author:
McFarland-Icke, Bronwyn Rebekah
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Author:
McFarland-Icke, Bronwyn Rebekah
Location:
Princeton, N.J. :
Subject:
Biography
Subject:
Military - World War II
Subject:
World war, 1939-1945
Subject:
History
Subject:
War
Subject:
Nurses and nursing
Subject:
Holocaust
Subject:
Medical ethics
Subject:
Nursing - General
Subject:
Psychiatric nursing
Subject:
Medical policy
Subject:
Nursing ethics
Subject:
Euthanasia
Subject:
Ethics, Nursing.
Subject:
Political systems.
Subject:
National socialism and medicine.
Subject:
World War, 19
Subject:
History of Science and Medicine, Philosophy of Science
Subject:
European History
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Psychology
Subject:
World War, 1939-1945 -- Atrocities.
Subject:
Military-World War II General
Copyright:
Series Volume:
105-25
Publication Date:
November 1999
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 24 oz

Related Subjects

Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Nursing
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Professional Medical Reference
History and Social Science » Military » World War II » Europe » General
History and Social Science » Military » World War II » General
History and Social Science » World History » Holocaust
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Zoology » General

Nurses in Nazi Germany: Moral Choice in History New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$85.50 In Stock
Product details 304 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691006659 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , This book tells the story of German nurses who, directly or indirectly, participated in the Nazis' "euthanasia" measures against patients with mental and physical disabilities, measures that claimed well over 100,000 victims from 1939 to 1945. How could men and women who were trained to care for their patients come to kill or assist in murder or mistreatment? This is the central question pursued by Bronwyn McFarland-Icke as she details the lives of nurses from the beginning of the Weimar Republic through the years of National Socialist rule. Rather than examine what the Party did or did not order, she looks into the hearts and minds of people whose complicity in murder is not easily explained with reference to ideological enthusiasm. Her book is a micro-history in which many of the most important ethical, social, and cultural issues at the core of Nazi genocide can be addressed from a fresh perspective.

McFarland-Icke offers gripping descriptions of the conditions and practices associated with psychiatric nursing during these years by mining such sources as nursing guides, personnel records, and postwar trial testimony. Nurses were expected to be conscientious and friendly caretakers despite job stress, low morale, and Nazi propaganda about patients' having "lives unworthy of living." While some managed to cope with this situation, others became abusive. Asylum administrators meanwhile encouraged nurses to perform with as little disruption and personal commentary as possible. So how did nurses react when ordered to participate in, or tolerate, the murder of their patients? Records suggest that some had no conflicts of conscience; others did as they were told with regret; and a few refused. The remarkable accounts of these nurses enable the author to re-create the drama taking place while sharpening her argument concerning the ability and the willingness to choose.

"Synopsis" by , "The descent into mass murder, for ordinary Germans like psychiatric nurses, was for the most part a matter of choices avoided. How the moral senses could be and were blunted by institutions and ideologies on the one hand and by personal subterfuges on the other--this is the subject of McFarland-Icke's careful and painstaking historical recounting and analysis. This is a quiet and watchful book, devoid of the sensationalism that so easily adheres to the subject of mass murder. But for that reason it has a powerful and lasting effect that extends beyond the historic subject matter."--Michael Geyer, University of Chicago

"Thoughtful, sensitive, and revealing, this book brings something new to the discussion of the perpetrators in the Nazi era, particularly those associated with the medical profession. This is history 'from the bottom up' of the very best kind."--Robert Gellately, Strassler Professor in Holocaust History, Clark University

"Nurses in Nazi Germany is bold, meticulously researched, and insightfully argued. Its topic is an important and relatively neglected one. Attracting general readers and scholars alike, the book should have a very long shelf life--not simply as the definitive history of Nazi nursing but as a major contribution to bioethics literature and ethics more broadly."--Robert N. Proctor, Professor of the History of Science, Pennsylvania State University

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.