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Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The acceptance of human rights and minority rights, the increasing role of international financial institutions, and globalization have led many observers to question the continued viability of the sovereign state. Here a leading expert challenges this conclusion. Stephen Krasner contends that states have never been as sovereign as some have supposed. Throughout history, rulers have been motivated by a desire to stay in power, not by some abstract adherence to international principles. Organized hypocrisy--the presence of longstanding norms that are frequently violated--has been an enduring attribute of international relations

Political leaders have usually but not always honored international legal sovereignty, the principle that international recognition should be accorded only to juridically independent sovereign states, while treating Westphalian sovereignty, the principle that states have the right to exclude external authority from their own territory, in a much more provisional way. In some instances violations of the principles of sovereignty have been coercive, as in the imposition of minority rights on newly created states after the First World War or the successor states of Yugoslavia after 1990; at other times cooperative, as in the European Human Rights regime or conditionality agreements with the International Monetary Fund.

The author looks at various issues areas to make his argument: minority rights, human rights, sovereign lending, and state creation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Differences in national power and interests, he concludes, not international norms, continue to be the most powerful explanation for the behavior of states.

Synopsis:

"Stephen Krasner weighs in on a growing debate over the continued relevance of sovereignty today. Is it declining or not? Is the state system about to be replaced by something else? Krasner's book will spark much debate and become required reading for all those who wish to think seriously about the nature of sovereignty today."--Hendrik Spruyt, Columbia University

"Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy is a book with a provocative theme that is tracked through a variety of interesting cases to a conclusion that may help to clarify contemporary discussions of a central theoretical and practical issue in the discipline. It is likely to become a standard example of mainstream realist efforts to address the current generation of arguments that globalization is producing fundamental change in international relations."--Jack Donnelly, University of Denver

Synopsis:

The acceptance of human rights and minority rights, the increasing role of international financial institutions, and globalization have led many observers to question the continued viability of the sovereign state. Here a leading expert challenges this conclusion. Stephen Krasner contends that states have never been as sovereign as some have supposed. Throughout history, rulers have been motivated by a desire to stay in power, not by some abstract adherence to international principles. Organized hypocrisy--the presence of longstanding norms that are frequently violated--has been an enduring attribute of international relations

Political leaders have usually but not always honored international legal sovereignty, the principle that international recognition should be accorded only to juridically independent sovereign states, while treating Westphalian sovereignty, the principle that states have the right to exclude external authority from their own territory, in a much more provisional way. In some instances violations of the principles of sovereignty have been coercive, as in the imposition of minority rights on newly created states after the First World War or the successor states of Yugoslavia after 1990; at other times cooperative, as in the European Human Rights regime or conditionality agreements with the International Monetary Fund.

The author looks at various issues areas to make his argument: minority rights, human rights, sovereign lending, and state creation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Differences in national power and interests, he concludes, not international norms, continue to be the most powerful explanation for the behavior of states.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [239]-254) and index.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

CHAPTER ONE Sovereignty and Its Discontents 3

CHAPTER TWO Theories of Institutions and International Politics 43

CHAPTER THREE Rulers and Ruled: Minority Rights 73

CHAPTER FOUR Rulers and Ruled: Human Rights 105

CHAPTER FIVE Sovereign Lending 127

CHAPTER SIX Constitutional Structures and New States in the Nineteenth Century 152

CHAPTER SEVEN Constitutional Structures and New States after 1945 184

CHAPTER EIGHT Conclusion: Not a Game of Chess 220

References 239

Index 255

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691007113
Author:
Krasner, Stephen D.
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton, N.J. :
Subject:
International Relations
Subject:
Sovereignty
Subject:
Political History
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
History & Theory
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Political philosophy
Subject:
Politics-United States Foreign Policy
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series Volume:
no. 1
Publication Date:
August 1999
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
2 tables
Pages:
248
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 14 oz

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Painting » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » International Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy

Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy New Trade Paper
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Product details 248 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691007113 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Stephen Krasner weighs in on a growing debate over the continued relevance of sovereignty today. Is it declining or not? Is the state system about to be replaced by something else? Krasner's book will spark much debate and become required reading for all those who wish to think seriously about the nature of sovereignty today."--Hendrik Spruyt, Columbia University

"Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy is a book with a provocative theme that is tracked through a variety of interesting cases to a conclusion that may help to clarify contemporary discussions of a central theoretical and practical issue in the discipline. It is likely to become a standard example of mainstream realist efforts to address the current generation of arguments that globalization is producing fundamental change in international relations."--Jack Donnelly, University of Denver

"Synopsis" by , The acceptance of human rights and minority rights, the increasing role of international financial institutions, and globalization have led many observers to question the continued viability of the sovereign state. Here a leading expert challenges this conclusion. Stephen Krasner contends that states have never been as sovereign as some have supposed. Throughout history, rulers have been motivated by a desire to stay in power, not by some abstract adherence to international principles. Organized hypocrisy--the presence of longstanding norms that are frequently violated--has been an enduring attribute of international relations

Political leaders have usually but not always honored international legal sovereignty, the principle that international recognition should be accorded only to juridically independent sovereign states, while treating Westphalian sovereignty, the principle that states have the right to exclude external authority from their own territory, in a much more provisional way. In some instances violations of the principles of sovereignty have been coercive, as in the imposition of minority rights on newly created states after the First World War or the successor states of Yugoslavia after 1990; at other times cooperative, as in the European Human Rights regime or conditionality agreements with the International Monetary Fund.

The author looks at various issues areas to make his argument: minority rights, human rights, sovereign lending, and state creation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Differences in national power and interests, he concludes, not international norms, continue to be the most powerful explanation for the behavior of states.

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