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25 Remote Warehouse World History- European History General

Other titles in the Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History series:

Settling Accounts: Violence, Justice, and Accountability in Postsocialist Europe (Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History)

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Settling Accounts: Violence, Justice, and Accountability in Postsocialist Europe (Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

As new states in the former East bloc begin to reckon with their criminal pasts in the years following a revolutionary change of regimes, a basic pattern emerges: In those states where some form of retributive justice has been publicly enacted, there has generally been much less of a recourse to collective retributive violence. In Settling Accounts, John Borneman explores the attempts by these aspiring democratic states to invoke the principles of the "rule of law" as a means of achieving retributive justice, that is, convicting wrongdoers and restoring dignity to victims of moral injuries. Democratic regimes, Borneman maintains, require a strict form of accountability that holds leaders responsible for acts of criminality. This accountability is embodied in the principles of the rule of law, and retribution is at the moral center of these principles.

Drawing from his ethnographic work in the former East Germany and with select comparisons to other East-Central European states, Borneman critically examines the construction of categories of criminality. He argues against the claims that economic growth, liberal democracy, or acts of reconciliation are adequate means to legitimate the transformed East bloc states. The cycles of violence in states lacking a system of retributive justice help to support this claim. Invocation of the principles of the rule of law must be seen as a chance for a more democratic, more accountable, and less violent world.

Synopsis:

As new states in the former East bloc begin to reckon with their criminal pasts in the years following a revolutionary change of regimes, a basic pattern emerges: In those states where some form of retributive justice has been publicly enacted, there has generally been much less of a recourse to collective retributive violence. In Settling Accounts, John Borneman explores the attempts by these aspiring democratic states to invoke the principles of the "rule of law" as a means of achieving retributive justice, that is, convicting wrongdoers and restoring dignity to victims of moral injuries. Democratic regimes, Borneman maintains, require a strict form of accountability that holds leaders responsible for acts of criminality. This accountability is embodied in the principles of the rule of law, and retribution is at the moral center of these principles.

Drawing from his ethnographic work in the former East Germany and with select comparisons to other East-Central European states, Borneman critically examines the construction of categories of criminality. He argues against the claims that economic growth, liberal democracy, or acts of reconciliation are adequate means to legitimate the transformed East bloc states. The cycles of violence in states lacking a system of retributive justice help to support this claim. Invocation of the principles of the rule of law must be seen as a chance for a more democratic, more accountable, and less violent world.

Synopsis:

Drawing from ethnographic work in the former East Germany, and with select comparisons to other East-Central European states, author John Borneman looks at how former East bloc states are dealing with their criminal past. He maintains that to create a less violent world, democratic regimes should require accountability and hold leaders responsible for acts of criminality and moral injustices.

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [177]-185) and index.

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
Pt. 1Framing, Comparing, Historicizing1
Ch. 1Framing the Rule of Law in East-Central Europe3
Ch. 2Comparing: Decommunization - Recommunization - Reform?26
Ch. 3Historicizing the Rule of Law40
Pt. 2Ethnography of Criminality57
Ch. 4The Invocation of the Rechtsstaat in East Germany: Governmental and Unification Criminality59
Ch. 5Accountability on Trial80
Pt. 3Ethnography of Vindication97
Ch. 6Democratic Accountability: Results, Evaluations, Ramifications99
Ch. 7Justice and Dignity: Victims, Vindication, and Accountability111
Pt. 4Legitimacy137
Ch. 8The Rule of Law and the State: Violence, Justice, and Legitimacy139
Notes167
Bibliography177
Index187
Name Index195

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691016818
Author:
Borneman, John
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton, N.J. :
Subject:
General
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Political crimes and offenses
Subject:
Europe - General
Subject:
Europe - Eastern
Subject:
Post-communism
Subject:
Social justice
Subject:
Rule of law
Subject:
Reparation
Subject:
Retribution
Subject:
Europe, Eastern Politics and government 1989-
Subject:
Social justice -- Europe, Eastern.
Subject:
Anthropology - General
Subject:
Anthropology
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Post-communism -- Europe, Eastern.
Subject:
Europe, Eastern Politics and government.
Subject:
World History-European History General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History Paperback
Publication Date:
November 1997
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
216
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 12 oz

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » General
Business » Banking
History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » World History » Eastern Europe
History and Social Science » World History » European History General
Science and Mathematics » Mathematics » General

Settling Accounts: Violence, Justice, and Accountability in Postsocialist Europe (Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$39.75 In Stock
Product details 216 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691016818 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , As new states in the former East bloc begin to reckon with their criminal pasts in the years following a revolutionary change of regimes, a basic pattern emerges: In those states where some form of retributive justice has been publicly enacted, there has generally been much less of a recourse to collective retributive violence. In Settling Accounts, John Borneman explores the attempts by these aspiring democratic states to invoke the principles of the "rule of law" as a means of achieving retributive justice, that is, convicting wrongdoers and restoring dignity to victims of moral injuries. Democratic regimes, Borneman maintains, require a strict form of accountability that holds leaders responsible for acts of criminality. This accountability is embodied in the principles of the rule of law, and retribution is at the moral center of these principles.

Drawing from his ethnographic work in the former East Germany and with select comparisons to other East-Central European states, Borneman critically examines the construction of categories of criminality. He argues against the claims that economic growth, liberal democracy, or acts of reconciliation are adequate means to legitimate the transformed East bloc states. The cycles of violence in states lacking a system of retributive justice help to support this claim. Invocation of the principles of the rule of law must be seen as a chance for a more democratic, more accountable, and less violent world.

"Synopsis" by , Drawing from ethnographic work in the former East Germany, and with select comparisons to other East-Central European states, author John Borneman looks at how former East bloc states are dealing with their criminal past. He maintains that to create a less violent world, democratic regimes should require accountability and hold leaders responsible for acts of criminality and moral injustices.
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