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25 Remote Warehouse Philosophy- Ethics

Exploitation

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Exploitation Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

What is the basis for arguing that a volunteer army exploits citizens who lack civilian career opportunities? How do we determine that a doctor who has sex with his patients is exploiting them? In this book, Alan Wertheimer seeks to identify when a transaction or relationship can be properly regarded as exploitative--and not oppressive, manipulative, or morally deficient in some other way--and explores the moral weight of taking unfair advantage. Among the first political philosophers to examine this important topic from a non-Marxist perspective, Wertheimer writes about ordinary experience in an accessible yet philosophically penetrating way. He considers whether it is seriously wrong for a party to exploit another if the transaction is consensual and mutually advantageous, whether society can justifiably prohibit people from entering into such a transaction, and whether it is wrong to allow oneself to be exploited.

Wertheimer first considers several contexts commonly characterized as exploitive, including surrogate motherhood, unconscionable contracts, the exploitation of student athletes, and sexual exploitation in psychotherapy. In a section outlining his theory of exploitation, he sets forth the criteria for a fair transaction and the point at which we can properly say that a party has consented. Whereas many discussions of exploitation have dealt primarily with cases in which one party harms or coerces another, Wertheimer's book focuses on what makes a mutually advantageous and consensual transaction exploitive and analyzes the moral and legal implications of such exploitation.

Synopsis:

What is the basis for arguing that a volunteer army exploits citizens who lack civilian career opportunities? How do we determine that a doctor who has sex with his patients is exploiting them? In this book, Alan Wertheimer seeks to identify when a transaction or relationship can be properly regarded as exploitative--and not oppressive, manipulative, or morally deficient in some other way--and explores the moral weight of taking unfair advantage. Among the first political philosophers to examine this important topic from a non-Marxist perspective, Wertheimer writes about ordinary experience in an accessible yet philosophically penetrating way. He considers whether it is seriously wrong for a party to exploit another if the transaction is consensual and mutually advantageous, whether society can justifiably prohibit people from entering into such a transaction, and whether it is wrong to allow oneself to be exploited.

Wertheimer first considers several contexts commonly characterized as exploitive, including surrogate motherhood, unconscionable contracts, the exploitation of student athletes, and sexual exploitation in psychotherapy. In a section outlining his theory of exploitation, he sets forth the criteria for a fair transaction and the point at which we can properly say that a party has consented. Whereas many discussions of exploitation have dealt primarily with cases in which one party harms or coerces another, Wertheimer's book focuses on what makes a mutually advantageous and consensual transaction exploitive and analyzes the moral and legal implications of such exploitation.

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
Ch. 1Overview3
Ch. 2Unconscionable Contracts37
Ch. 3The Exploitation of Student Athletes77
Ch. 4Commercial Surrogacy96
Ch. 5Unconstitutional Conditions123
Ch. 6Sexual Exploitation in Psychotherapy158
Ch. 7Unfair Transactions207
Ch. 8Consent247
Ch. 9Moral Weight and Moral Force278
Index311

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691019475
Author:
Wertheimer, Alan
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
General
Subject:
Philosophy
Subject:
History & Theory
Subject:
Ethics & Moral Philosophy
Subject:
Social Services & Welfare
Subject:
Unjust enrichment
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
Public Policy - Social Services & Welfare
Subject:
Services & Welfare
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Philosophy | Ethics
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
July 1999
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
23 line illus. 2 tables
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 17 oz

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family
Humanities » Philosophy » Ethics
Humanities » Philosophy » General

Exploitation New Trade Paper
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$43.25 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691019475 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , What is the basis for arguing that a volunteer army exploits citizens who lack civilian career opportunities? How do we determine that a doctor who has sex with his patients is exploiting them? In this book, Alan Wertheimer seeks to identify when a transaction or relationship can be properly regarded as exploitative--and not oppressive, manipulative, or morally deficient in some other way--and explores the moral weight of taking unfair advantage. Among the first political philosophers to examine this important topic from a non-Marxist perspective, Wertheimer writes about ordinary experience in an accessible yet philosophically penetrating way. He considers whether it is seriously wrong for a party to exploit another if the transaction is consensual and mutually advantageous, whether society can justifiably prohibit people from entering into such a transaction, and whether it is wrong to allow oneself to be exploited.

Wertheimer first considers several contexts commonly characterized as exploitive, including surrogate motherhood, unconscionable contracts, the exploitation of student athletes, and sexual exploitation in psychotherapy. In a section outlining his theory of exploitation, he sets forth the criteria for a fair transaction and the point at which we can properly say that a party has consented. Whereas many discussions of exploitation have dealt primarily with cases in which one party harms or coerces another, Wertheimer's book focuses on what makes a mutually advantageous and consensual transaction exploitive and analyzes the moral and legal implications of such exploitation.

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