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Budweisers Into Czechs and Germans

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

This history of a single town in Bohemia casts new light on nationalism in Central Europe between the Springtime of Nations in 1848 and the Cold War. Jeremy King tells the story of both German and Czech-speaking Budweis/Budæjovice, which belonged to the Habsburg Monarchy until 1918, and then to Czechoslovakia, Hitler's Third Reich, and Czechoslovakia again. Residents, at first simply "Budweisers," or Habsburg subjects with mostly local loyalties, gradually became Czechs or Germans. Who became Czech, though, and who German? What did it mean to be one or the other?

In answering these questions, King shows how an epochal, region-wide contest for power found expression in Budweis/Budæjovice not only through elections but through clubs, schools, boycotts, breweries, a remarkable constitutional experiment, a couple of riots, and much more. In tracing the nationalization of politics from small and sometimes comic beginnings to the genocide and mass expulsions of the 1940s, he also rejects traditional interpretive frameworks. Writing not a national history but a history of nationhood, both Czech and German, King recovers a nonnational dimension to the past. Embodied locally by Budweisers and more generally by the Habsburg state, that dimension has long been blocked from view by a national rhetoric of race and ethnicity. King's Czech-Habsburg-German narrative, in addition to capturing the dynamism and complexity of Bohemian politics, participates in broader scholarly discussions concerning the nature of nationalism.

Synopsis:

This history of a single town in Bohemia casts new light on nationalism in Central Europe between the Springtime of Nations in 1848 and the Cold War. Jeremy King tells the story of both German and Czech-speaking Budweis/Budæjovice, which belonged to the Habsburg Monarchy until 1918, and then to Czechoslovakia, Hitler's Third Reich, and Czechoslovakia again. Residents, at first simply "Budweisers," or Habsburg subjects with mostly local loyalties, gradually became Czechs or Germans. Who became Czech, though, and who German? What did it mean to be one or the other?

In answering these questions, King shows how an epochal, region-wide contest for power found expression in Budweis/Budæjovice not only through elections but through clubs, schools, boycotts, breweries, a remarkable constitutional experiment, a couple of riots, and much more. In tracing the nationalization of politics from small and sometimes comic beginnings to the genocide and mass expulsions of the 1940s, he also rejects traditional interpretive frameworks. Writing not a national history but a history of nationhood, both Czech and German, King recovers a nonnational dimension to the past. Embodied locally by Budweisers and more generally by the Habsburg state, that dimension has long been blocked from view by a national rhetoric of race and ethnicity. King's Czech-Habsburg-German narrative, in addition to capturing the dynamism and complexity of Bohemian politics, participates in broader scholarly discussions concerning the nature of nationalism.

Synopsis:

"King provides a compelling narrative of nation building in a single Central European town. The story is told engagingly and with a rare freshness of style. King shows a masterful command over an impressive range of primary sources and exploits it fully in charting and interpreting the dynamics of nation building at the micro level within its larger historical setting."--David F. Good, University of Minnesota

"This book makes a significant contribution to a very active scholarly field. It is particularly welcome for the way it focuses on nationalism in one of those places that western European historians like to avoid because of the muddled and messy nature of identities in them. This will be an important book."--Celia Applegate, University of Rochester

About the Author

Jeremy King is Associate Professor in the Department of History at Mount Holyoke College.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations vii

Preface viii

Introduction: Budweisers into Czechs and Germans 1

Chapter One: Plolitics in Flux, 1848-1871 15

Chapter Two: A More Broad and National Politics, 1871-1890 48

Chapter Three: Free-for-All, 1890-1902 80

Chapter Four: Toward a Multinational State, 1902-1918 114

Chapter Five: Bohemian Politics Reframed, 1918-1945 153

Conclusion: Budweis Buried, 1945-1948 189

Notes 213

Bibliography 255

Index 275

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691122342
Author:
King, Jeremy
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Europe - Germany
Subject:
Eastern Europe - General
Subject:
Germany
Subject:
European History
Subject:
World History-Germany
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
January 2005
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
10 halftones.
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 15 oz

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Related Subjects

» History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
» History and Social Science » Economics » General
» History and Social Science » Europe » Eastern Europe » Czechoslovakia
» History and Social Science » Geography » General
» History and Social Science » Military » General History
» History and Social Science » Politics » General
» History and Social Science » World History » Austria
» History and Social Science » World History » Eastern Europe
» History and Social Science » World History » Germany » General

Budweisers Into Czechs and Germans New Trade Paper
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Product details 304 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691122342 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , This history of a single town in Bohemia casts new light on nationalism in Central Europe between the Springtime of Nations in 1848 and the Cold War. Jeremy King tells the story of both German and Czech-speaking Budweis/Budæjovice, which belonged to the Habsburg Monarchy until 1918, and then to Czechoslovakia, Hitler's Third Reich, and Czechoslovakia again. Residents, at first simply "Budweisers," or Habsburg subjects with mostly local loyalties, gradually became Czechs or Germans. Who became Czech, though, and who German? What did it mean to be one or the other?

In answering these questions, King shows how an epochal, region-wide contest for power found expression in Budweis/Budæjovice not only through elections but through clubs, schools, boycotts, breweries, a remarkable constitutional experiment, a couple of riots, and much more. In tracing the nationalization of politics from small and sometimes comic beginnings to the genocide and mass expulsions of the 1940s, he also rejects traditional interpretive frameworks. Writing not a national history but a history of nationhood, both Czech and German, King recovers a nonnational dimension to the past. Embodied locally by Budweisers and more generally by the Habsburg state, that dimension has long been blocked from view by a national rhetoric of race and ethnicity. King's Czech-Habsburg-German narrative, in addition to capturing the dynamism and complexity of Bohemian politics, participates in broader scholarly discussions concerning the nature of nationalism.

"Synopsis" by ,

"King provides a compelling narrative of nation building in a single Central European town. The story is told engagingly and with a rare freshness of style. King shows a masterful command over an impressive range of primary sources and exploits it fully in charting and interpreting the dynamics of nation building at the micro level within its larger historical setting."--David F. Good, University of Minnesota

"This book makes a significant contribution to a very active scholarly field. It is particularly welcome for the way it focuses on nationalism in one of those places that western European historians like to avoid because of the muddled and messy nature of identities in them. This will be an important book."--Celia Applegate, University of Rochester

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