It's Raining Books Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Interviews | September 2, 2014

Jill Owens: IMG David Mitchell: The Powells.com Interview



David MitchellDavid Mitchell's newest mind-bending, time-skipping novel may be his most accomplished work yet. Written in six sections, one per decade, The Bone... Continue »
  1. $21.00 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Bone Clocks

    David Mitchell 9781400065677

spacer

On Order

$45.50
New Trade Paper
Currently out of stock.
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
- Local Warehouse Sociology- Violence in Society

Violence: A Micro-Sociological Theory

by

Violence: A Micro-Sociological Theory Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the popular misconception fostered by blockbuster action movies and best-selling thrillers--not to mention conventional explanations by social scientists--violence is easy under certain conditions, like poverty, racial or ideological hatreds, or family pathologies. Randall Collins challenges this view in Violence, arguing that violent confrontation goes against human physiological hardwiring. It is the exception, not the rule--regardless of the underlying conditions or motivations.

Collins gives a comprehensive explanation of violence and its dynamics, drawing upon video footage, cutting-edge forensics, and ethnography to examine violent situations up close as they actually happen--and his conclusions will surprise you. Violence comes neither easily nor automatically. Antagonists are by nature tense and fearful, and their confrontational anxieties put up a powerful emotional barrier against violence. Collins guides readers into the very real and disturbing worlds of human discord--from domestic abuse and schoolyard bullying to muggings, violent sports, and armed conflicts. He reveals how the fog of war pervades all violent encounters, limiting people mostly to bluster and bluff, and making violence, when it does occur, largely incompetent, often injuring someone other than its intended target. Collins shows how violence can be triggered only when pathways around this emotional barrier are presented. He explains why violence typically comes in the form of atrocities against the weak, ritualized exhibitions before audiences, or clandestine acts of terrorism and murder--and why a small number of individuals are competent at violence.

Violence overturns standard views about the root causes of violence and offers solutions for confronting it in the future.

Synopsis:

"Covering infinitely recurrent strips of social action running from blustering confrontation to intimate physical attack, Violence is peppered with breakthrough insights, demonstrating the power of systematic theory and even concluding with that rarest of sociological contributions, a short list of eminently practical suggestions. The concept of 'forward panic' alone makes the book indispensable. This book is a milestone contribution to criminology, to micro-sociology, to the sociology of emotions, and to a field that knows no academic boundaries: the history of efforts to control violence. Randy Collins has developed a framework that should guide a generation of research."--Jack Katz, University of California, Los Angeles

"I have no doubt that this book will be hailed as one of the most important works on violence ever written. After reading it, it is difficult any longer to imagine that all that is needed for violence to occur is a motive to engage in violence. Collins argues persuasively that the situation must also be right if violence is actually to occur."--Donald Black, author of The Social Structure of Right and Wrong

"A masterful study of the microdynamics of violence. This book will undoubtedly provoke excitement and controversy among a wide group of readers, including educated nonspecialists as well as academics, journalists, law-enforcement professionals, and policymakers. Truly an original book."--Eiko Ikegami, author of The Taming of the Samurai

Synopsis:

In the popular misconception fostered by blockbuster action movies and best-selling thrillers--not to mention conventional explanations by social scientists--violence is easy under certain conditions, like poverty, racial or ideological hatreds, or family pathologies. Randall Collins challenges this view in Violence, arguing that violent confrontation goes against human physiological hardwiring. It is the exception, not the rule--regardless of the underlying conditions or motivations.

Collins gives a comprehensive explanation of violence and its dynamics, drawing upon video footage, cutting-edge forensics, and ethnography to examine violent situations up close as they actually happen--and his conclusions will surprise you. Violence comes neither easily nor automatically. Antagonists are by nature tense and fearful, and their confrontational anxieties put up a powerful emotional barrier against violence. Collins guides readers into the very real and disturbing worlds of human discord--from domestic abuse and schoolyard bullying to muggings, violent sports, and armed conflicts. He reveals how the fog of war pervades all violent encounters, limiting people mostly to bluster and bluff, and making violence, when it does occur, largely incompetent, often injuring someone other than its intended target. Collins shows how violence can be triggered only when pathways around this emotional barrier are presented. He explains why violence typically comes in the form of atrocities against the weak, ritualized exhibitions before audiences, or clandestine acts of terrorism and murder--and why a small number of individuals are competent at violence.

Violence overturns standard views about the root causes of violence and offers solutions for confronting it in the future.

About the Author

Randall Collins is the Dorothy Swaine Thomas Professor of Sociology and a member of the Department of Criminology at the University of Pennsylvania. His books include "Interaction Ritual Chains" (Princeton) and "The Sociology of Philosophies: A Global Theory of Intellectual Change".

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations and Tables ix

Acknowledgments xiii

Chapter 1: The Micro-sociology of Violent Confrontations 1

Violent Situations 1

Micro-evidence: Situational Recordings, Reconstructions, and Observations 3

Comparing Situations across Types of Violence 8

Fight Myths 10

Violent Situations Are Shaped by an Emotional Field of Tension and Fear 19

Alternative Theoretical Approaches 20

Historical Evolution of Social Techniques for Controlling Confrontational Tension 25

Sources 29

Preview 32

The Complementarity of Micro and Macro Theories 34

PART ONE: The Dirty Secrets of Violence 37

Chapter 2: Confrontational Tension and Incompetent Violence 39

Brave, Competent and Evenly Matched? 39

The Central Reality: Confrontational Tension 41

Tension/Fear and Non-performance in Military Combat 43

Low Fighting Competence 57

Friendly Fire and Bystander Hits 59

Joy of Combat: Under What Conditions? 66

The Continuum of Tension/Fear and Combat Performance 68

Confrontational Tension in Policing and Non-Military Fighting 70

Fear of What? 73

Chapter 3: Forward Panic 83

Confrontational Tension and Release: Hot Rush, Piling On, Overkill 89

Atrocities of War 94

Caveat: The Multiple Causation of Atrocities 99

Asymmetrical Entrainment of Forward Panic and Paralyzed Victims 102

Forward Panics and One-Sided Casualties in Decisive Battles 104

Atrocities of Peace 112

Crowd Violence 115

Demonstrators and Crowd-Control Forces 121

The Crowd Multiplier 128

Alternatives to Forward Panic 132

Chapter 4: Attacking the Weak: I. Domestic Abuse 134

The Emotional Definition of the Situation 134

Background and Foreground Explanations 135

Abusing the Exceptionally Weak: Time-patterns from Normalcy to Atrocity 137

Three Pathways: Normal Limited Conflict, Severe Forward Panic, and Terroristic Torture Regime 141

Negotiating Interactional Techniques of Violence and Victimhood 148

Chapter 5: Attacking the Weak: II. Bullying, Mugging, and Holdups 156

The Continuum of Total Institutions 165

Muggings and Holdups 174

Battening on Interactional Weakness 186

PART TWO: Cleaned-up and Staged Violence 191

Chapter 6: Staging Fair Fights 193

Hero versus Hero 194

Audience Supports and Limits on Violence 198

Fighting Schools and Fighting Manners 207

Displaying Risk and Manipulating Danger in Sword and Pistol Duels 212

The Decline of Elite Dueling and Its Replacement by the Gunfight 220

Honor without Fairness: Vendettas as Chains of Unbalanced Fights 223

Ephemeral Situational Honor and Leap-Frog Escalation to One-Gun Fights 226

Behind the Fac¸ade of Honor and Disrespect 229

The Cultural Prestige of Fair and Unfair Fights 237

Chapter 7: Violence as Fun and Entertainment 242

Moral Holidays 243

Looting and Destruction as Participation Sustainers 245

The Wild Party as Elite Potlatch 253

Carousing Zones and Boundary Exclusion Violence 256

End-Resisting Violence 259

Frustrated Carousing and Stirring up Effervescence 261

Paradox: Why Does Most Intoxication Not Lead to Violence? 263

The One-Fight-Per-Venue Limitation 270

Fighting as Action and Fun 274

Mock Fights and Mosh Pits 277

Chapter 8: Sports Violence 282

Sports as Dramatically Contrived Conflicts 283

Game Dynamics and Player Violence 285

Winning by Practical Skills for Producing Emotional Energy Dominance 296

The Timing of Player Violence: Loser-Frustration Fights and Turning-Point Fights 302

Spectators' Game-Dependent Violence 307

Offsite Fans' Violence: Celebration and Defeat Riots 311

Offsite Violence as Sophisticated Technique: Soccer Hooligans 315

The Dramatic Local Construction of Antagonistic Identities 324

Revolt of the Audience in the Era of Entertainers' Domination 328

PART THREE: Dynamics and Structure of Violent Situations 335

Chapter 9: How Fights Start, or Not 337

Normal Limited Acrimony: Griping, Whining, Arguing, Quarreling 338

Boasting and Blustering 345

The Code of the Street: Institutionalized Bluster and Threat 348

Pathways into the Tunnel of Violence 360

Chapter 10: The Violent Few 370

Small Numbers of the Actively and Competently Violent 370

Confrontation Leaders and Action-Seekers: Police 375

Who Wins? 381

Military Snipers: Concealed and Absorbed in Technique 381

Fighter Pilot Aces: Aggressively Imposing Momentum 387

In the Zone versus the Glaze of Combat: Micro-situational Techniques of Interactional Dominance 399

The 9/11 Cockpit Fight 409

11. Violence as Dominance in Emotional Attention Space 413

What Does the Rest of the Crowd Do? 413

Violence without Audiences: Professional Killers and Clandestine Violence 430

Confrontation-Minimizing Terrorist Tactics 440

Violent Niches in Confrontational Attention Space 448

Epilogue Practical Conclusions 463

Notes 467

References 527

Index 555

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691143224
Author:
Collins, Randall
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Location:
Princeton
Subject:
Violence in Society
Subject:
Sociology - Social Theory
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Anthropology
Subject:
Sociology-Violence in Society
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20090831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
College/higher education:
Language:
English
Illustrations:
53 halftones. 1 line illus. 4 tables.
Pages:
584
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in 29 oz

Other books you might like

  1. The Logic of Life: The Rational... Used Trade Paper $6.50

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Crime » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Violence in Society

Violence: A Micro-Sociological Theory New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$45.50 Backorder
Product details 584 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691143224 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Covering infinitely recurrent strips of social action running from blustering confrontation to intimate physical attack, Violence is peppered with breakthrough insights, demonstrating the power of systematic theory and even concluding with that rarest of sociological contributions, a short list of eminently practical suggestions. The concept of 'forward panic' alone makes the book indispensable. This book is a milestone contribution to criminology, to micro-sociology, to the sociology of emotions, and to a field that knows no academic boundaries: the history of efforts to control violence. Randy Collins has developed a framework that should guide a generation of research."--Jack Katz, University of California, Los Angeles

"I have no doubt that this book will be hailed as one of the most important works on violence ever written. After reading it, it is difficult any longer to imagine that all that is needed for violence to occur is a motive to engage in violence. Collins argues persuasively that the situation must also be right if violence is actually to occur."--Donald Black, author of The Social Structure of Right and Wrong

"A masterful study of the microdynamics of violence. This book will undoubtedly provoke excitement and controversy among a wide group of readers, including educated nonspecialists as well as academics, journalists, law-enforcement professionals, and policymakers. Truly an original book."--Eiko Ikegami, author of The Taming of the Samurai

"Synopsis" by , In the popular misconception fostered by blockbuster action movies and best-selling thrillers--not to mention conventional explanations by social scientists--violence is easy under certain conditions, like poverty, racial or ideological hatreds, or family pathologies. Randall Collins challenges this view in Violence, arguing that violent confrontation goes against human physiological hardwiring. It is the exception, not the rule--regardless of the underlying conditions or motivations.

Collins gives a comprehensive explanation of violence and its dynamics, drawing upon video footage, cutting-edge forensics, and ethnography to examine violent situations up close as they actually happen--and his conclusions will surprise you. Violence comes neither easily nor automatically. Antagonists are by nature tense and fearful, and their confrontational anxieties put up a powerful emotional barrier against violence. Collins guides readers into the very real and disturbing worlds of human discord--from domestic abuse and schoolyard bullying to muggings, violent sports, and armed conflicts. He reveals how the fog of war pervades all violent encounters, limiting people mostly to bluster and bluff, and making violence, when it does occur, largely incompetent, often injuring someone other than its intended target. Collins shows how violence can be triggered only when pathways around this emotional barrier are presented. He explains why violence typically comes in the form of atrocities against the weak, ritualized exhibitions before audiences, or clandestine acts of terrorism and murder--and why a small number of individuals are competent at violence.

Violence overturns standard views about the root causes of violence and offers solutions for confronting it in the future.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.