Wintersalen Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Tour our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | November 7, 2014

    Karelia Stetz-Waters: IMG The Hot Sex Tip Cosmo Won't Tell You



    Cosmopolitan Magazine recently released an article titled "28 Mind-Blowing Lesbian Sex Positions." Where was this vital information when I was a... Continue »
    1. $10.47 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$16.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Literature- A to Z

Ambrose Bierce's Write It Right: The Celebrated Cynic's Language Peeves Deciphered, Appraised, and Annotated for 21st-Century Readers

by

Ambrose Bierce's Write It Right: The Celebrated Cynic's Language Peeves Deciphered, Appraised, and Annotated for 21st-Century Readers Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"[I]f [Bierce] were here to cross swords with [Jan Freeman] over contemporary usage issues — over guidelines for precision in this terrifyingly grammarless post-apocalyptic dystopia (LOL) — he would probably just fucking vanquish her. On the other hand, who knows? Maybe Freeman would win, and Bitter Bierce would slink off to tilt at some windmills and pee in the Atlantic. My money is on the devil." Elizabeth Bachner, Bookslut (read the entire Bookslut review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

One of Americas foremost language experts presents an annotated edition of A mbrose Bierces classic catalog of correct speech.

Ambrose Bierce is best known for The Devil's Dictionary, but the prolific journalist, satirist, and fabulist was also a usage maven.  In 1909, he published several hundred of his pet peeves in Write It Right: A Little Blacklist of Literary Faults.

Bierce's list includes some distinctions still familiar today--the which-that rule, less vs. fewer, lie and lay — but it also abounds in now-forgotten shibboleths: Ovation, the critics of his time agreed, meant a Roman triumph, not a round of applause. Reliable was an ill-formed coinage, not for the discriminating. Donate was pretentious, jeopardize should be jeopard, demean meant "comport oneself," not "belittle." And Bierce made up a few peeves of his own for good measure. We should say "a coating of paint," he instructed, not "a coat."

To mark the 100th anniversary of Write It Right, language columnist Jan Freeman has investigated  where Bierce's rules and taboos originated, how they've fared in the century since the blacklist, and what lies ahead. Will our language quibbles seem as odd in 2109 as Bierce's do today?  From the evidence offered here, it looks like a very good bet.

Synopsis:

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914) was a short story writer, an editorialist, a satirist and a journalist. He is best known for his devil's Dictionary. His sardonic view of human nature and his tough stance as a critic earned him the nickname "Bitter Bierce." Despite his reputation Bierce always encouraged young writers. Bierce went to Mexico to get a first hand view of the revolution. He disappeared without a trace. Write It Right A Little Blacklist of Literary Faults was published in 1909. Bierce wrote this little book as a guide to improving writing. He states that precision is the key. Choosing the exact word and using it correctly is essential. Colloquialisms and vulgar language have no place is serious writing. A writer must use his values in determining what is appropriate. The lessons Bierce gives in this book are as appropriate today as they were a century ago.

Synopsis:

Freeman, one of America's foremost language experts and acclaimed author of the "Boston Globe's" weekly column The Word, presents an annotated edition of Ambrose Bierce's classic catalog of correct speech.

Synopsis:

One of Americas foremost language experts presents an annotated edition of A mbrose Bierces classic catalog of correct speech.

Ambrose Bierce is best known for The Devil's Dictionary, but the prolific journalist, satirist, and fabulist was also a usage maven.  In 1909, he published several hundred of his pet peeves in Write It Right: A Little Blacklist of Literary Faults.

Bierce's list includes some distinctions still familiar today--the which-that rule, less vs. fewer, lie and lay — but it also abounds in now-forgotten shibboleths: Ovation, the critics of his time agreed, meant a Roman triumph, not a round of applause. Reliable was an ill-formed coinage, not for the discriminating. Donate was pretentious, jeopardize should be jeopard, demean meant "comport oneself," not "belittle." And Bierce made up a few peeves of his own for good measure. We should say "a coating of paint," he instructed, not "a coat."

To mark the 100th anniversary of Write It Right, language columnist Jan Freeman has investigated  where Bierce's rules and taboos originated, how they've fared in the century since the blacklist, and what lies ahead. Will our language quibbles seem as odd in 2109 as Bierce's do today?  From the evidence offered here, it looks like a very good bet.

About the Author

In The Devils Dictionary, Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914?), defined cynic as “a blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be”--a description he strove to embody throughout his long and witty career. His writing includes journalism, poetry, satire, and fiction, much of it based on his Civil War experience. In 1913 he set off for Mexico, then in the throes of revolution, and was never seen again.

Jan Freeman has been writing “The Word,” the Boston Globe's Sunday  language column, since 1997. A lifelong usage geek with a graduate degree in English, she has worked as an editor at the Real PaperBoston and Inc. magazines, and the Boston Globe.. She lives in Newton, Mass.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780802717689
Subtitle:
The Celebrated Cynic's Language Peeves Deciphered, Appraised, and Annotated for 21st-Century Readers
Author:
Bierce, Ambrose
Author:
Freeman, Jan
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Subject:
General
Subject:
Etymology
Subject:
English language -- Errors of usage.
Subject:
Composition & Creative Writing - General
Subject:
Writing Skills
Subject:
General Language Arts & Disciplines
Subject:
Linguistics - Etymology
Subject:
Reference/Writing
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20091110
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
7.89 x 6.14 x 0.905 in

Other books you might like

  1. The Gingerbread Man
    Used Board Book $4.95
  2. The Phantom Tollbooth
    Used Trade Paper $3.50
  3. Stories of John Cheever Used Mass Market $4.50
  4. The Complete Stories
    Used Trade Paper $10.00

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
History and Social Science » Linguistics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Reference » Etymology
Reference » Writing » General

Ambrose Bierce's Write It Right: The Celebrated Cynic's Language Peeves Deciphered, Appraised, and Annotated for 21st-Century Readers Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.95 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Walker & Company - English 9780802717689 Reviews:
"Review A Day" by , "[I]f [Bierce] were here to cross swords with [Jan Freeman] over contemporary usage issues — over guidelines for precision in this terrifyingly grammarless post-apocalyptic dystopia (LOL) — he would probably just fucking vanquish her. On the other hand, who knows? Maybe Freeman would win, and Bitter Bierce would slink off to tilt at some windmills and pee in the Atlantic. My money is on the devil." (read the entire Bookslut review)
"Synopsis" by , Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914) was a short story writer, an editorialist, a satirist and a journalist. He is best known for his devil's Dictionary. His sardonic view of human nature and his tough stance as a critic earned him the nickname "Bitter Bierce." Despite his reputation Bierce always encouraged young writers. Bierce went to Mexico to get a first hand view of the revolution. He disappeared without a trace. Write It Right A Little Blacklist of Literary Faults was published in 1909. Bierce wrote this little book as a guide to improving writing. He states that precision is the key. Choosing the exact word and using it correctly is essential. Colloquialisms and vulgar language have no place is serious writing. A writer must use his values in determining what is appropriate. The lessons Bierce gives in this book are as appropriate today as they were a century ago.
"Synopsis" by , Freeman, one of America's foremost language experts and acclaimed author of the "Boston Globe's" weekly column The Word, presents an annotated edition of Ambrose Bierce's classic catalog of correct speech.
"Synopsis" by ,
One of Americas foremost language experts presents an annotated edition of A mbrose Bierces classic catalog of correct speech.

Ambrose Bierce is best known for The Devil's Dictionary, but the prolific journalist, satirist, and fabulist was also a usage maven.  In 1909, he published several hundred of his pet peeves in Write It Right: A Little Blacklist of Literary Faults.

Bierce's list includes some distinctions still familiar today--the which-that rule, less vs. fewer, lie and lay — but it also abounds in now-forgotten shibboleths: Ovation, the critics of his time agreed, meant a Roman triumph, not a round of applause. Reliable was an ill-formed coinage, not for the discriminating. Donate was pretentious, jeopardize should be jeopard, demean meant "comport oneself," not "belittle." And Bierce made up a few peeves of his own for good measure. We should say "a coating of paint," he instructed, not "a coat."

To mark the 100th anniversary of Write It Right, language columnist Jan Freeman has investigated  where Bierce's rules and taboos originated, how they've fared in the century since the blacklist, and what lies ahead. Will our language quibbles seem as odd in 2109 as Bierce's do today?  From the evidence offered here, it looks like a very good bet.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.