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25 Remote Warehouse Native American- General Native American Studies

More copies of this ISBN

Other titles in the Women in the West series:

Engendered Encounters: Feminism & Pueblo Cultures, 1879-1934 (Women in the West)

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Engendered Encounters: Feminism & Pueblo Cultures, 1879-1934 (Women in the West) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

On June 25, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court heard the case Adoptive Couple vs. Baby Girl, which pitted adoptive parents Matt and Melanie Capobianco against baby Veronicaandrsquo;s biological father, Dusten Brown, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. Veronicaandrsquo;s biological mother had relinquished her for adoption to the Capobiancos without Brownandrsquo;s consent. Although Brown regained custody of his daughter using the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) of 1978, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Capobiancos, rejecting the purpose of the ICWA and ignoring the long history of removing Indigenous children from their families.
and#160;
In A Generation Removed, a powerful blend of history and family stories, award-winning historian Margaret D. Jacobs examines how government authorities in the postandndash;World War II era removed thousands of American Indian children from their families and placed them in non-Indian foster or adoptive families. By the late 1960s an estimated 25 to 35 percent of Indian children had been separated from their families.
and#160;
Jacobs also reveals the global dimensions of the phenomenon: These practices undermined Indigenous families and their communities in Canada and Australia as well. Jacobs recounts both the trauma and resilience of Indigenous families as they struggled to reclaim the care of their children, leading to the ICWA in the United States and to national investigations, landmark apologies, and redress in Australia and Canada.and#160;

and#160;

Synopsis:

In this interdisciplinary study of gender, cross-cultural encounters, and federal Indian policy, Margaret D. Jacobs explores the changing relationship between Anglo-American women and Pueblo Indians before and after the turn of the century. During the late nineteenth century, the Pueblos were often characterized by women reformers as barbaric and needing to be "uplifted" into civilization. By the 1920s, however, the Pueblos were widely admired by activist Anglo-American women, who challenged assimilation policies and worked hard to protect the Pueblosand#8217; "traditional" way of life.
and#160;
Deftly weaving together an analysis of changes in gender roles, attitudes toward sexuality, public conceptions of Native peoples, and federal Indian policy, Jacobs argues that the impetus for this transformation in perception rests less with a progressively tolerant view of Native peoples and more with fundamental shifts in the ways Anglo-American women saw their own sexuality and social responsibilities.

About the Author

Margaret D. Jacobs is an assistant professor of history at New Mexico State University.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780803276093
Author:
Jacobs, Margaret D.
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press
Location:
Lincoln :
Subject:
Indians of north america
Subject:
Public opinion
Subject:
Feminism & Feminist Theory
Subject:
Native American
Subject:
Native American Studies - Tribes
Subject:
Government relations
Subject:
Women social reformers
Subject:
Feminists
Subject:
Pueblo indians
Subject:
Public opinion -- United States.
Subject:
Pueblo Indians -- Cultural assimilation.
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - Native American Studies - Tribes
Subject:
Feminists -- United States.
Subject:
Native American-General Native American Studies
Subject:
Native American Studies
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series:
Women in the West
Publication Date:
19990131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16 images, 1 table
Pages:
400
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » General
History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
History and Social Science » World History » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Travel » Travel Writing » General

Engendered Encounters: Feminism & Pueblo Cultures, 1879-1934 (Women in the West) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$31.75 In Stock
Product details 400 pages University of Nebraska Press - English 9780803276093 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
In this interdisciplinary study of gender, cross-cultural encounters, and federal Indian policy, Margaret D. Jacobs explores the changing relationship between Anglo-American women and Pueblo Indians before and after the turn of the century. During the late nineteenth century, the Pueblos were often characterized by women reformers as barbaric and needing to be "uplifted" into civilization. By the 1920s, however, the Pueblos were widely admired by activist Anglo-American women, who challenged assimilation policies and worked hard to protect the Pueblosand#8217; "traditional" way of life.
and#160;
Deftly weaving together an analysis of changes in gender roles, attitudes toward sexuality, public conceptions of Native peoples, and federal Indian policy, Jacobs argues that the impetus for this transformation in perception rests less with a progressively tolerant view of Native peoples and more with fundamental shifts in the ways Anglo-American women saw their own sexuality and social responsibilities.
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