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Original Essays | August 21, 2014

Richard Bausch: IMG Why Literature Can Save Us



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    Before, During, After

    Richard Bausch 9780307266262

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After the War on Crime: Race, Democracy, and a New Reconstruction

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After the War on Crime: Race, Democracy, and a New Reconstruction Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Since the 1970s, Americans have witnessed a pyrrhic war on crime, with sobering numbers at once chilling and cautionary. Our imprisoned population has increased five-fold, with a commensurate spike in fiscal costs that many now see as unsupportable into the future. As American society confronts a multitude of new challenges ranging from terrorism to the disappearance of middle-class jobs to global warming, the war on crime may be up for reconsideration for the first time in a generation or more. Relatively low crime rates indicate that the public mood may be swinging toward declaring victory and moving on.

However, to declare that the war is over is dangerous and inaccurate, and After the War on Crime reveals that the impact of this war reaches far beyond statistics; simply moving on is impossible. The war has been most devastating to those affected by increased rates and longer terms of incarceration, but its reach has also reshaped a sweeping range of social institutions, including law enforcement, politics, schooling, healthcare, and social welfare. The war has also profoundly altered conceptions of race and community.

It is time to consider the tasks reconstruction must tackle. To do so requires first a critical assessment of how this war has remade our society, and then creative thinking about how government, foundations, communities, and activists should respond. After the War on Crime accelerates this reassessment with original essays by a diverse, interdisciplinary group of scholars as well as policy professionals and community activists. The volume's immediate goal is to spark a fresh conversation about the war on crime and its consequences; its long-term aspiration is to develop a clear understanding of how we got here and of where we should go.

Synopsis:

Affirmative action remains a hotly contested issue on our political landscape, yet the institutionalized systems of privilege which uphold the status quo remain unchallenged. Many Americans who advocate a merit-based, race-free worldview do not acknowledge the systems of privilege which benefit them. For example, many Americans rely on a social and sometimes even financial inheritance from previous generations. This inheritance, unlikely to be forthcoming if one's ancestors were slaves, privileges whiteness, maleness, and heterosexuality.

In this important volume, scholars positioned differently with respect to white privilege examine how privilege of all forms manifests itself and how we can, and must, be aware of invisible privilege in our daily lives. Individual chapters focus on language, the workplace, the implications of comparing racism and sexism, race-based housing privilege, the dream of diversity and the cycle of exclusion, the rule of law and invisible systems of privilege, and the power of law to transform society.

About the Author

Mary Louise Frampton is Director of the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice at Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California, Berkeley.

Ian Haney López is Professor of Law at Boalt Hall and author of White by Law (NYU Press) and Racism on Trial.

Jonathan Simon is Professor of Law at Boalt Hall and author of Governing through Crime: How the War on Crime Transformed American Democracy and Created a Culture of Fear.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814727614
Author:
Frampton, Mary Louise
Publisher:
New York University Press
Editor:
Haney Lopez, Ian
Editor:
Simon, Jonathan
Author:
Lopez, Ian
Author:
Simon, Jonathan
Author:
Haney Lopez, Ian
Author:
Wildman, Stephanie
Author:
Frampton, Mary
Author:
Lopez, Ian Haney
Subject:
Criminal Law - General
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Criminal justice, administration of
Subject:
Crime
Subject:
Criminology
Subject:
Criminal Law
Subject:
Penology
Subject:
Public Policy - General
Subject:
Discrimination in criminal justice administra
Subject:
Crime-Criminology
Subject:
Discrimination
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20080731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Crime » Criminology
History and Social Science » Crime » Prisons and Prisoners
History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General

After the War on Crime: Race, Democracy, and a New Reconstruction New Trade Paper
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Product details 256 pages New York University Press - English 9780814727614 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Affirmative action remains a hotly contested issue on our political landscape, yet the institutionalized systems of privilege which uphold the status quo remain unchallenged. Many Americans who advocate a merit-based, race-free worldview do not acknowledge the systems of privilege which benefit them. For example, many Americans rely on a social and sometimes even financial inheritance from previous generations. This inheritance, unlikely to be forthcoming if one's ancestors were slaves, privileges whiteness, maleness, and heterosexuality.

In this important volume, scholars positioned differently with respect to white privilege examine how privilege of all forms manifests itself and how we can, and must, be aware of invisible privilege in our daily lives. Individual chapters focus on language, the workplace, the implications of comparing racism and sexism, race-based housing privilege, the dream of diversity and the cycle of exclusion, the rule of law and invisible systems of privilege, and the power of law to transform society.

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