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This title in other editions

God in Chinatown: Religion and Survival in New York's Evolving Immigrant Community (Religion, Race, and Ethnicity)

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God in Chinatown: Religion and Survival in New York's Evolving Immigrant Community (Religion, Race, and Ethnicity) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

View the #LINK<Table of Contents>#.

Read the #LINK<Introduction>#.

"The excellent vignettes throughout the book further show, in striking detail, how immigrants from Fuzhou use the language and ideas of their faith traditions to make sense of their journeys and their daily lives in the United States. This book is a welcome addition to recent research about religion and the post-1965 immigrants."—Contemporary Sociology

"God in Chinatown is useful for historians as well as those interested in the sociology of religion, the Chinese Diaspora, or New York City."—Religious Studies Review

"God in Chinatown is an important study for historians and social scientists. Guest has...expanded the horizons of students of ethnic history."

Journal of American Ethnic History

"In this volume Guest has succeeded in showing the importance of religion to the self-definition of immigrants from Fuzhou in their new home in New York's Chinatown and other cities across the United States. As a student of theology, he understands the importance of religion to human survival and flourishing in the face of tremendous obstacles, especially for the immigrants of Fuzhou in urban America."—China Review international

"There is no question that this book makes an important contribution to the emerging field of religion and immigration as well as to research on contemporary Asian religions. The information and perspective Guest provides not only substantially enhance our knowledge of these topics but help us view them in a new light."

The Journal of Religion

"Guest does an excellent job of helping the reader understand the place of these religious institutions both within Chinatown and the religious landscape in China. The book is so stimulating that it leads the reader to formulate more questions."—Sociology of Religion

"Students and scholars in the fields of church history, religion in the US, the history of religions, comparative religions, and Asian studies will find that this intriguing book suggests a variety of directions for further exploration."

Choice

"A well-researched, well-written, and timely ethnographic study of the importance of religious groups in the lives of Fuzhounese immigrants to the United States. It should be of great interest to scholars of contemporary Chinese religion, and to sociologists and anthropologists interested in religion and transnationalism. A readable and affordable monograph."—Journal of Chinese Religions

"God in Chinatown is a pioneering ethnographic study....A must read for those interested in ethnic communities, immigration, and religion. It is a welcome addition to the growing number of studies that are recognizing the important connections between religion and immigration in the incorporation of immigrants and the reconstructions of what is America itself."

Journal of the American Academy of Religion

"As a first ethnographic study to systematically examine the role of religious organizations and immigrant adaptations among the Fuzhounese, the book is a welcome edition to the existing literature of the sociology of religion. Guest devotes much of the book to describing the religious life that the Fuzhounese left behind in Fujian and the new one that they have rebuilt in New York. he shows clearly and unequivocally that ethnic religious institutions play a central and intrumental role in assisting disadvantaged immigrants to survive adverse circumstances. He also makes a nuanced point about the interconnectedness between ethnic religious institutions and ethnic economies in Chinatown and between Chinatown and its transnational networks."

Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion

"The exceptionally rich ethnography is very interesting to read."

American Journal of Sociology

"In this volume Guest has succeeded in showing the importance of religion in the self-definition of Fuzhounese immigrants in their new home in New York Chinatown and in the network of cities across the United States."

China News Update

"This book fascinates by making what is familiar much more complicated and interesting. Recommended."

CHOICE

God in Chinatown is a path breaking study of the largest contemporary wave of new immigrants to Chinatown. Since the 1980s, tens of thousands of mostly rural Chinese have migrated from Fuzhou, on China's southeastern coast, to New York's Chinatown. Like the Cantonese who comprised the previous wave of migrants, the Fuzhou have brought with them their religious beliefs, practices, and local deities. In recent years these immigrants have established numerous specifically Fuzhounese religious communities, ranging from Buddhist, Daoist, and Chinese popular religion to Protestant and Catholic Christianity.

This ethnographic study examines the central role of these religious communities in the immigrant incorporation process in Chinatown's highly stratified ethnic enclave, as well as the transnational networks established between religious communities in New York and China. The author's knowledge of Chinese coupled with his extensive fieldwork in both China and New York enable him to illuminate how these networks transmit religious and social dynamics to the United States, as well as how these new American institutions influence religious and social relations in the religious revival sweeping southeastern China.

God in Chinatown is the first study to bring to light religion's significant role in the Fuzhounese immigrants' dramatic transformation of the face of New York's Chinatown.

Synopsis:

This comprehensive volume brings together the major essays in the subject of law and development. The first sections concerns the relationship between legal systems and social, political and economic change in developing countries. The second section seeks to explain issues which concern law and development in the domestic context.

Synopsis:

God in Chinatown is a path breaking study of the largest contemporary wave of new immigrants to Chinatown. Since the 1980s, tens of thousands of mostly rural Chinese have migrated from Fuzhou, on Chinas southeastern coast, to New Yorks Chinatown. Like the Cantonese who comprised the previous wave of migrants, the Fuzhou have brought with them their religious beliefs, practices, and local deities. In recent years these immigrants have established numerous specifically Fuzhounese religious communities, ranging from Buddhist, Daoist, and Chinese popular religion to Protestant and Catholic Christianity.

This ethnographic study examines the central role of these religious communities in the immigrant incorporation process in Chinatowns highly stratified ethnic enclave, as well as the transnational networks established between religious communities in New York and China. The authors knowledge of Chinese coupled with his extensive fieldwork in both China and New York enable him to illuminate how these networks transmit religious and social dynamics to the United States, as well as how these new American institutions influence religious and social relations in the religious revival sweeping southeastern China.

God in Chinatown is the first study to bring to light religion's significant role in the Fuzhounese immigrants dramatic transformation of the face of New Yorks Chinatown.

About the Author

Kenneth J. Guest is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Baruch College, CUNY, and Senior Research Consultant at the International Center for Migration, Ethnicity, and Citizenship.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780814731543
Author:
Guest, Kenneth J.
Publisher:
New York University Press
Author:
Guest, Kenneth
Author:
Carty, Anthony
Location:
New York
Subject:
Emigration & Immigration
Subject:
Sociology of Religion
Subject:
Immigrants
Subject:
Chinese americans
Subject:
Chinatown
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - Asian American Studies
Subject:
IMMIGRANTS_UNITED STATES
Subject:
UNITED STATES_RELIGION
Subject:
MULTICULTURAL STUDIES_NEW YORK
Subject:
ETHNOGRAPHY_NEW YORK
Subject:
General Religion
Subject:
Chinatown (New York, N.Y.)
Subject:
Immigrants - Religious life -
Subject:
Ethnic Studies-Asian American
Subject:
General Law
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Religion, Race, and Ethnicity Ser.
Series Volume:
v. 10, 11, 281-289
Publication Date:
20030831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
225
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Asian American
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Chinese American
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration
History and Social Science » World History » General
Religion » Eastern Religions » General
Religion » Western Religions » Social and Political Issues

God in Chinatown: Religion and Survival in New York's Evolving Immigrant Community (Religion, Race, and Ethnicity) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$29.50 In Stock
Product details 225 pages New York University Press - English 9780814731543 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , This comprehensive volume brings together the major essays in the subject of law and development. The first sections concerns the relationship between legal systems and social, political and economic change in developing countries. The second section seeks to explain issues which concern law and development in the domestic context.
"Synopsis" by , God in Chinatown is a path breaking study of the largest contemporary wave of new immigrants to Chinatown. Since the 1980s, tens of thousands of mostly rural Chinese have migrated from Fuzhou, on Chinas southeastern coast, to New Yorks Chinatown. Like the Cantonese who comprised the previous wave of migrants, the Fuzhou have brought with them their religious beliefs, practices, and local deities. In recent years these immigrants have established numerous specifically Fuzhounese religious communities, ranging from Buddhist, Daoist, and Chinese popular religion to Protestant and Catholic Christianity.

This ethnographic study examines the central role of these religious communities in the immigrant incorporation process in Chinatowns highly stratified ethnic enclave, as well as the transnational networks established between religious communities in New York and China. The authors knowledge of Chinese coupled with his extensive fieldwork in both China and New York enable him to illuminate how these networks transmit religious and social dynamics to the United States, as well as how these new American institutions influence religious and social relations in the religious revival sweeping southeastern China.

God in Chinatown is the first study to bring to light religion's significant role in the Fuzhounese immigrants dramatic transformation of the face of New Yorks Chinatown.

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