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2 Remote Warehouse Native American- General Native American Studies

The Animals Came Dancing: Native American Sacred Ecology and Animal Kinship

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The Animals Came Dancing: Native American Sacred Ecology and Animal Kinship Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Native American hunter had a true appreciation of where his food came from and developed a ritual relationship to animal life—an understanding and attitude almost completely lacking in modern culture. In this major overview of the relation between Indians and animals on the northern Great Plains, Howard Harrod recovers a sense of the knowledge that hunting peoples had of the animals upon which they depended and raises important questions about Euroamerican relationships with the natural world. Harrod's account deals with twelve Northern Plains peoples—Lakota, Blackfeet, Cheyenne, Pawnee, and others—who with the arrival of the horse in the eighteenth century became the buffalo hunters who continue to inhabit the American imagination. Harrod describes their hunting practices and the presence of animals in their folklore and shows how these traditions reflect a "sacred ecology" in which humans exist in relationship with other powers, including animals. Drawing on memories of Native Americans recorded by anthropologists, fur traders, missionaries, and other observers, Harrod examines cultural practices that flourished from the mid-eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth century. He reconstructs the complex rituals of Plains peoples, which included buffalo hunting ceremonies employing bundles or dancing, and rituals such as the Sun Dance for the renewal of animals. In a closing chapter, Harrod examines the meanings of Indian-animal relations for a contemporary society that values human dominance over the natural world—one in which domestic animals are removed from our consciousness as a source of food, wild animals are managed for humans to "experience," and hunting has become a form of recreation. His meticulous scholarship re-imagines a vanished way of life, while his keen insights give voice to a hunger among many contemporary people for the recovery of a ritual relationship between themselves and the natural sources of their lives.

Book News Annotation:

In his study of the relation between Indians and animals on the northern Great Plains, Harrod (social ethics and sociology of religion, Oberlin U.) examines cultural practices that flourished from the mid-18th to the mid-19th century. He focuses on hunting practices and the presence of animals in the folklore of the Lakota, Blackfeet, Cheyenne, Pawnee, and other peoples and how their traditions reflect a "sacred ecology" in which humans exist in relationship with other powers, including animals. He also explores the meanings of Indian-animal relations for a contemporary society that values human dominance over the natural world.
Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Description:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [153]-163) and index.

About the Author

Howard L. Harrod is Oberlin Alumni Professor of Social Ethics and Sociology of Religion and Professor of Religious Studies at Vanderbilt University.

Table of Contents

1. Northern Plains hunters — 2. In the beginning there were animals — 3. The gift of animals — 4. Animal rituals on the Northern Plains — 5. Renewing the animals — 6. Humans and animals in the twenty-first century.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780816520275
Author:
Harrod, Howard L.
Publisher:
University of Arizona Press
Location:
Tucson :
Subject:
Native American Studies
Subject:
Human-animal relationships
Subject:
Religion
Subject:
Indians of north america
Subject:
Religion and mythology
Subject:
Hunting
Subject:
Siksika Indians
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - Native American Studies
Subject:
Hunting - General
Subject:
Indians of North America -- Great Plains.
Subject:
Indians of North America -- Hunting.
Subject:
Native American Studies, Nature and Environment
Subject:
Native American-General Native American Studies
Edition Description:
Paperback
Series Volume:
106-93
Publication Date:
20000231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Pages:
170
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Native American » General Native American Studies
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Sports and Outdoors » Outdoors » Fishing and Hunting » General
Travel » Travel Writing » General

The Animals Came Dancing: Native American Sacred Ecology and Animal Kinship New Trade Paper
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Product details 170 pages University of Arizona Press - English 9780816520275 Reviews:
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