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Stevie Wonder: Songs in the Key of Life (33 1/3 Series)

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Stevie Wonder: Songs in the Key of Life (33 1/3 Series) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Songs in the Key of Life is imperfect but audacious. If its titular concern — life — doesn't exactly allow for rigid focus, it's still a fiercely inspired and definitive collection of songs. Lundy's book, in keeping with the album's themes, is structured as a life cycle. Within this framework, Lundy covers Wonder's recording methodology, his reliance on synthesizers and the album's place in the gospel-inspired progression of 1970s R&B.

Review:

"It was only a matter of time before a clever publisher realized that there is an audience for whom Exile on Main Street or Electric Ladyland are as significant and worthy of study as The Catcher in the Rye or Middlemarch. The series... is freewheeling and eclectic, ranging from minute rock-geek analysis to idiosyncratic personal celebration." The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"Ideal for the rock geek who thinks liner notes just aren't enough." Rolling Stone

Review:

"One of the coolest publishing imprints on the planet." Bookslut

Review:

"These are for the insane collectors out there who appreciate fantastic design, well-executed thinking, and things that make your house look cool. Each volume in this series takes a seminal album and breaks it down in startling minutiae. We love these. We are huge nerds." Vice

Review:

"A brilliant series... each one a word of real love." NME

Review:

"Passionate, obsessive, and smart." Nylon

Review:

"Religious tracts for the rock 'n' roll faithful." Uncut

Review:

"We... aren't naive enough to think that we're your only source for reading about music (but if we had our way... watch out). For those of you who really like to know everything there is to know about an album, you'd do well to check out Continuum's 33 1/3 series of books." Pitchfork

Synopsis:

33 1/3 is a series of short books about a wide variety of albums, by artists ranging from James Brown to the Beastie Boys. Launched in September 2003, the series now contains over 50 titles and is acclaimed and loved by fans, musicians and scholars alike.

Synopsis:

Like all double albums, Songs in the Key of Life is imperfect but audacious. If its titular concern - life - doesn't exactly allow for rigid focus, it's still a fiercely inspired collection of songs and one of the definitive soul records of the 1970s. Stevie Wonder was unable to control the springs of his creativity during that decade. Upon turning 21 in 1971, he freed himself from the Motown contract he'd been saddled with as a child performer, renegotiated the terms, and unleashed hundreds of songs to tape. Over the next five years, Wonder would amass countless recordings and release his five greatest albums - as prolific a golden period as there has ever been in contemporary music. But Songs in the Key of Life is different from the four albums that preceded it; it's an overstuffed, overjoyed, maddeningly ambitious encapsulation of all the progress Stevie Wonder had made in that short space of time.

Zeth Lundy's book, in keeping with the album's themes, is structured as a life cycle. It's divided into the following sections: Birth; Innocence/Adolescence; Experience/Adulthood; Death; Rebirth. Within this framework, Zeth Lundy covers Stevie Wonder's excessive work habits and recording methodology, his reliance on synthesizers, the album's place in the gospel-inspired progression of 1970s R'n'B, and many other subjects.  

About the Author

Zeth Lundy is Music Columns Editor at the online magazine Popmatters.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780826419262
Author:
Lundy, Zeth
Publisher:
Continuum
Subject:
General
Subject:
Rock musicians
Subject:
Sound recording industry
Subject:
History & Criticism - General
Subject:
Genres & Styles - Rock
Subject:
Rock musicians -- United States.
Subject:
Music -- History and criticism.
Subject:
History & Criticism *
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
33 1/3
Series Volume:
42
Publication Date:
20070131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
6.57 x 4.76 x 0.34 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Genres and Styles » Rock
Arts and Entertainment » Music » History and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Recording Techniques
Humanities » Philosophy » General

Stevie Wonder: Songs in the Key of Life (33 1/3 Series) New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.95 In Stock
Product details 160 pages Continuum International Publishing Group - English 9780826419262 Reviews:
"Review" by , "It was only a matter of time before a clever publisher realized that there is an audience for whom Exile on Main Street or Electric Ladyland are as significant and worthy of study as The Catcher in the Rye or Middlemarch. The series... is freewheeling and eclectic, ranging from minute rock-geek analysis to idiosyncratic personal celebration."
"Review" by , "Ideal for the rock geek who thinks liner notes just aren't enough."
"Review" by , "One of the coolest publishing imprints on the planet."
"Review" by , "These are for the insane collectors out there who appreciate fantastic design, well-executed thinking, and things that make your house look cool. Each volume in this series takes a seminal album and breaks it down in startling minutiae. We love these. We are huge nerds."
"Review" by , "A brilliant series... each one a word of real love."
"Review" by , "Passionate, obsessive, and smart."
"Review" by , "Religious tracts for the rock 'n' roll faithful."
"Review" by , "We... aren't naive enough to think that we're your only source for reading about music (but if we had our way... watch out). For those of you who really like to know everything there is to know about an album, you'd do well to check out Continuum's 33 1/3 series of books."
"Synopsis" by , 33 1/3 is a series of short books about a wide variety of albums, by artists ranging from James Brown to the Beastie Boys. Launched in September 2003, the series now contains over 50 titles and is acclaimed and loved by fans, musicians and scholars alike.
"Synopsis" by ,

Like all double albums, Songs in the Key of Life is imperfect but audacious. If its titular concern - life - doesn't exactly allow for rigid focus, it's still a fiercely inspired collection of songs and one of the definitive soul records of the 1970s. Stevie Wonder was unable to control the springs of his creativity during that decade. Upon turning 21 in 1971, he freed himself from the Motown contract he'd been saddled with as a child performer, renegotiated the terms, and unleashed hundreds of songs to tape. Over the next five years, Wonder would amass countless recordings and release his five greatest albums - as prolific a golden period as there has ever been in contemporary music. But Songs in the Key of Life is different from the four albums that preceded it; it's an overstuffed, overjoyed, maddeningly ambitious encapsulation of all the progress Stevie Wonder had made in that short space of time.

Zeth Lundy's book, in keeping with the album's themes, is structured as a life cycle. It's divided into the following sections: Birth; Innocence/Adolescence; Experience/Adulthood; Death; Rebirth. Within this framework, Zeth Lundy covers Stevie Wonder's excessive work habits and recording methodology, his reliance on synthesizers, the album's place in the gospel-inspired progression of 1970s R'n'B, and many other subjects.  

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