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Soviet Textiles: Designing the Modern Utopia

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Soviet Textiles: Designing the Modern Utopia Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Between 1927 and 1933, as the new Soviet Union emerged and the Communist party struggled to transform an agrarian country into an industrialized state, a group of young artists pitched in by designing fabrics depicting tractors, smokestacks and symbols of collective modernity, cloth with which to mold its buyers into ideal Soviet citizens. Few of these designs ever saw mass production, and the experiment failed as propaganda--comrades clung to their traditional floral motifs--but it yielded bold and intriguing new designs. "Soviet Textiles: Designing the Modern Utopia" presents some 40 of them, and analyzes the political and artistic context in which they were made. Pamela Jill Kachurin identifies major themes and motifs, including industrialization, transportation, electrification, youth, agriculture and collectivization, and sports and hobbies, and analyzes the work both as propaganda and as graphic art, in this, the only English-language book to treat them from that perspective.

Book News Annotation:

Published to accompany an exhibition by the same name held at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston in 2006, this small catalog contains an essay by Kachurin, an art historian, discussing the era in which the textiles were produced, their themes, and the political meaning they were meant to convey. Full-page color plates of the printed textiles fill the volume, which is not indexed.
Annotation 2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Book News Annotation:

Published to accompany an exhibition by the same name held at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston in 2006, this small catalog contains an essay by Kachurin, an art historian, discussing the era in which the textiles were produced, their themes, and the political meaning they were meant to convey. Full-page color plates of the printed textiles fill the volume, which is not indexed. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780878467037
Author:
Kachurin, Pamela Jill
Publisher:
MFA Publications
Subject:
Design - Textile & Costume
Subject:
European
Subject:
History - Modern (Late 19th Century to 1945)
Subject:
History
Subject:
Textile fabrics
Subject:
Textile & Costume
Subject:
Textile fabrics - Russia (Federation) -
Subject:
Textile design - Russia (Federation) -
Subject:
Art-History and Criticism
Edition Description:
First
Publication Date:
20070831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
93
Dimensions:
9.04x8.02x.29 in. .82 lbs.

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