The Fictioning Horror Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Powell's Q&A | September 3, 2014

Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
  1. $17.47 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$15.00
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
8 Remote Warehouse Poetry- A to Z
1 Remote Warehouse Poetry- A to Z

Macular Hole

by

Macular Hole Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Wagner's poems proclaim, among other things, a finitude--I'm total I'm all I'm absorbed in this meatcake--that is anything but final, that is instead embodied and generative. From the completion of the human body arise the actions of the human mind; it is these that Wagner charts, with affection, detachment, a measured embarrassment, and a calculated grossness, in defiance of all recommendation.

That Wagner is in love with the world and its transactions--perception, superficial and otherwise; childbearing, painful and otherwise; domestic arrangement, satisfactory and otherwise; gains, financial and otherwise--allows for a poetry that is full of song yet brazenly topical: Its subjects range from the controlled experiment of selfhood to the blooming and pruning of personal dynamics on a road-trip to . . . God and country / given up and given.

In this, Catherine Wagner's second book, we spy a poet espousing, somewhat fearful of her mandate and putting that fear to good use in the service of real exchange.

Review:

"In this unexpectedly direct sophomore effort, Wagner blends charm with aggression. Wagner's Miss America (2001) showed a wary critic of consumer culture questioning linguistic givens; these poems, while no less self-conscious, show considerably more verve. 'I'm an example, and experimental/ Attempt to assess how a kid of my talents/ Responds when she's given the life that I was,' one poem says; two pages later, though, Wagner disavows 'The glamorous self and its story.' Ragged exclamations and folk and playground rhymes give her choppy, hip discourse surprising energy; her anger — and her willingness to identify its causes — set it further apart. Some of those causes come from sexual experience, others from the travails of raising a young son. Childbearing and motherhood take over the second half of this fairly short book, to fiery effect: 'I hate the baby, stop crying... I hate you coming over my life like a bag'; 'At my breast/ He sold himself/ To me as my/ Needer.' Readers accustomed to canny ironies may find her 'outrageous,/ power-outageous' interjections too demonstrative, but her powerful ends finally justify their strenuous means. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Catherine Wagner's poems have elicited resounding, answering calls from several continents. These are poems of sex and identity, poems of spleen and craving, poems of grim energy and outspoken crisis. I love them. I am bored by so many of America's new bloods but this woman can write. Her neo-surreal vision and neo-dada attitude are matched by an exceptional feel for the magic of simple language--her poems organically grow down the page without effort, every line seeming right. She manages this by infusing every new image (and every repetition) with a corresponding voice posture. Very American, very urban, very modern and yet harking back to the best 'beat' legacies.--Josephine Ebert, U.K. poetry critic. Here in the United States, Rae Armantrout has this to say: Jack Spicer's Martians are back, but now they're talking wild girl-talk. In Catherine Wagner's Miss America, public and private collide in a new way, like matter and anti-matter. This is a conflagration. That is damage talk, she says, Want to watch me/Make it. And I do. In fact, if I died, I might want to come back as Catherine Wagner. Such enthusiastic identifications don't come cheap: Wagner's poems are worth their weight in flesh and gold.

Synopsis:

Wagner proclaims a generative finitude. Shes in love with the world and its transactions, full of song yet brazenly topical.

Synopsis:

Catherine Wagner's poems proclaim a finitude that is anything but final, that is instead embodied and generative. That Wagner is in love with the world and its transactions--perceptions, superficial and otherwise; childbearing, painful and otherwise; gains, financial and otherwise--allows for a poetry that is full of song yet brazenly topical.

About the Author

Poet Catherine Wagner was born to military parents in Burma and raised in Baltimore, Maryland. Wagner is a graduate of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, the University of Iowa Writer's Workshop, and the University of Utah's Ph.D in Literature program. She is Assistant Professor at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780974090917
Manufactured:
Fence Books
Publisher:
Fence Books
Manufactured:
Fence Books
Author:
Wagner, Catherine
Subject:
General
Subject:
American - General
Subject:
General Poetry
Subject:
Single Author / American
Subject:
Poetry-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Publication Date:
20040431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
64
Dimensions:
8 x 6 in 4 oz

Other books you might like

  1. Eyeshot Used Trade Paper $12.00
  2. Dictee Used Trade Paper $7.95
  3. Ghostwood (New York Poets Series) Used Hardcover $5.75

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Poetry » A to Z

Macular Hole New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$15.00 In Stock
Product details 64 pages Fence Books - English 9780974090917 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this unexpectedly direct sophomore effort, Wagner blends charm with aggression. Wagner's Miss America (2001) showed a wary critic of consumer culture questioning linguistic givens; these poems, while no less self-conscious, show considerably more verve. 'I'm an example, and experimental/ Attempt to assess how a kid of my talents/ Responds when she's given the life that I was,' one poem says; two pages later, though, Wagner disavows 'The glamorous self and its story.' Ragged exclamations and folk and playground rhymes give her choppy, hip discourse surprising energy; her anger — and her willingness to identify its causes — set it further apart. Some of those causes come from sexual experience, others from the travails of raising a young son. Childbearing and motherhood take over the second half of this fairly short book, to fiery effect: 'I hate the baby, stop crying... I hate you coming over my life like a bag'; 'At my breast/ He sold himself/ To me as my/ Needer.' Readers accustomed to canny ironies may find her 'outrageous,/ power-outageous' interjections too demonstrative, but her powerful ends finally justify their strenuous means. (June)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Catherine Wagner's poems have elicited resounding, answering calls from several continents. These are poems of sex and identity, poems of spleen and craving, poems of grim energy and outspoken crisis. I love them. I am bored by so many of America's new bloods but this woman can write. Her neo-surreal vision and neo-dada attitude are matched by an exceptional feel for the magic of simple language--her poems organically grow down the page without effort, every line seeming right. She manages this by infusing every new image (and every repetition) with a corresponding voice posture. Very American, very urban, very modern and yet harking back to the best 'beat' legacies.--Josephine Ebert, U.K. poetry critic. Here in the United States, Rae Armantrout has this to say: Jack Spicer's Martians are back, but now they're talking wild girl-talk. In Catherine Wagner's Miss America, public and private collide in a new way, like matter and anti-matter. This is a conflagration. That is damage talk, she says, Want to watch me/Make it. And I do. In fact, if I died, I might want to come back as Catherine Wagner. Such enthusiastic identifications don't come cheap: Wagner's poems are worth their weight in flesh and gold.
"Synopsis" by ,
Wagner proclaims a generative finitude. Shes in love with the world and its transactions, full of song yet brazenly topical.
"Synopsis" by ,
Catherine Wagner's poems proclaim a finitude that is anything but final, that is instead embodied and generative. That Wagner is in love with the world and its transactions--perceptions, superficial and otherwise; childbearing, painful and otherwise; gains, financial and otherwise--allows for a poetry that is full of song yet brazenly topical.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.