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The Jesus Discovery: The New Archaeological Find That Reveals the Birth of Christianity

The Jesus Discovery: The New Archaeological Find That Reveals the Birth of Christianity Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The story of a stunning new discovery that provides the first physical evidence of Christians in Jerusalem during the time of Jesus and his apostles.

In 2010, using a specialized robotic camera, authors Tabor and Jacobovici, working with archaeologists, geologists, and forensic anthropologists, explored a previously unexcavated tomb in Jerusalem from around the time of Jesus. They made a remarkable discovery. The tomb contained several ossuaries, or bone boxes, two of which were carved with an iconic image and a Greek inscription. Taken together, the image and the inscription constitute the earliest archaeological evidence of faith in Jesus’ resurrection.

    Since the newly discovered ossuaries can be reliably dated to before 70 AD, when Jerusalem was destroyed by the Romans, they also provide the first evidence in Jerusalem of the people who would later be called “Christians.” In fact, it is possible, maybe even likely, that whoever was buried in this tomb knew Jesus and heard him preach.

     The newly examined tomb is only 200 feet away from the so-called Jesus Family Tomb. This controversial tomb, excavated in 1980 and recently brought to international attention, contained ossuaries inscribed with names associated with Jesus and his immediate family. Critics dismissed the synchronicity of names as mere coincidence. But the new discovery increases the likelihood that the “Jesus Family Tomb” is, indeed, the real tomb of Jesus of Nazareth. Tabor and Jacobovici discuss the evidence in support of this interpretation and describe how both tombs appear to have been part of the property of a wealthy individual, possibly Joseph of Arimathea, the man who, according to the gospels, buried Jesus.

     The Jesus Discovery explains how the recent find is revolutionizing our understanding of the earliest years of Christianity. Tabor and Jacobovici discuss what the concept of resurrection meant to the first followers of Jesus, particularly how it differed from the common understanding of the term today. Because the new archaeological discovery predates all other Christian documents, including the gospels, it offers a dramatic witness to what the people who knew Jesus believed.

     There is no doubt that this is one of the most important archaeological discoveries ever made. The Jesus Discovery is the firsthand account of how it happened and what it means.

Synopsis:

Tabor and Jacobovici have examined a sealed first-century tomb in Jerusalem, where they have found the earliest evidence for a belief in the resurrection of Jesus, based on what appears to be the oldest Christian iconography ever discovered. This major new find will be the subject of a primetime National Geographic Society television documentary. The discovery affirms a belief in the resurrection of Jesus that pre-dates the Gospels. It is possible, perhaps even likely, that whoever was buried in this tomb heard Jesus preach.

The stunning discovery also reopens the historical discussion of a nearby tomb previously identified by the authors as the family tomb of Jesus. That tomb contained ossuaries that may be those of Jesus, Mary Magdalene, and members of the family of Jesus. Was Jesus married, and did he father a child who was buried in this tomb?

Praise for The Jesus Family Tomb by Simcha Jacobovici and Charles Pellegrino:

“This discovery is potentially the last nail in the coffin of biblical literalism.” —John Dominic Crossan, author of God & Empire

Praise for James D. Tabor’s The Jesus Dynasty:

“Many scholars have undertaken studies of Jesus and his legacy; none has dared advance the boldly provocative theses of The Jesus Dynasty.—Bart Ehrman, author of Misquoting Jesus

Synopsis:

The Jesus Discovery shows how a recent major archeological discovery in Jerusalem is revolutionizing our understanding of Jesus and the earliest years of Christianity.Tabor and Jacobovici have examined a sealed first-century tomb in Jerusalem, where they have found the earliest evidence for a belief in the resurrection of Jesus, based on what appears to be the oldest Christian iconography ever discovered. This major new find will be the subject of a primetime National Geographic Society television documentary. The discovery affirms a belief in the resurrection of Jesus that pre-dates the Gospels. It is possible, perhaps even likely, that whoever was buried in this tomb heard Jesus preach.

The stunning discovery also reopens the historical discussion of a nearby tomb previously identified by the authors as the family tomb of Jesus. That tomb contained ossuaries that may be those of Jesus, Mary Magdalene, and members of the family of Jesus. Was Jesus married, and did he father a child who was buried in this tomb?

The new discovery will be the subject of an early November press conference. Publication of the book will coincide with the press conference.

About the Author

James D. Tabor is Chair of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, where he has taught since 1989. He has previously held positions at the University of Notre Dame and the College of William and Mary. He is the author or coauthor of several books, including The Jesus Discovery (with Simcha Jacobovici) and The Jesus Dynasty.  His first book was a study of the mysticism of the apostle Paul titled Things Unutterable (1986), based on his University of Chicago dissertation. The prestigious

Product Details

ISBN:
9781442346468
Subtitle:
The New Archaeological Find That Reveals the Birth of Christianity
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Audio
Author:
AMP
Author:
TBA
Author:
<
Author:
Schuster, Inc. All rights reserved.
Author:
Culp, Jason
Author:
>
Author:
Tabor, James D.
Author:
(P)2011 Simon
Author:
&
Author:
Jacobovici, Simcha
Author:
br
Subject:
Church History
Subject:
World History-Ancient History
Subject:
Christianity-Church History General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Unabridged
Publication Date:
20120228
Binding:
CD-audio
Language:
English
Dimensions:
5.75 x 5.06 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » World History » Ancient History
Religion » Christianity » Church History » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » Religious Experience
Religion » Western Religions » General and Comparative Religion

The Jesus Discovery: The New Archaeological Find That Reveals the Birth of Christianity
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Product details pages Simon & Schuster Audio - English 9781442346468 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Tabor and Jacobovici have examined a sealed first-century tomb in Jerusalem, where they have found the earliest evidence for a belief in the resurrection of Jesus, based on what appears to be the oldest Christian iconography ever discovered. This major new find will be the subject of a primetime National Geographic Society television documentary. The discovery affirms a belief in the resurrection of Jesus that pre-dates the Gospels. It is possible, perhaps even likely, that whoever was buried in this tomb heard Jesus preach.

The stunning discovery also reopens the historical discussion of a nearby tomb previously identified by the authors as the family tomb of Jesus. That tomb contained ossuaries that may be those of Jesus, Mary Magdalene, and members of the family of Jesus. Was Jesus married, and did he father a child who was buried in this tomb?

Praise for The Jesus Family Tomb by Simcha Jacobovici and Charles Pellegrino:

“This discovery is potentially the last nail in the coffin of biblical literalism.” &#8212;John Dominic Crossan, author of God & Empire

Praise for James D. Tabor’s The Jesus Dynasty:

“Many scholars have undertaken studies of Jesus and his legacy; none has dared advance the boldly provocative theses of The Jesus Dynasty.&#8212;Bart Ehrman, author of Misquoting Jesus

"Synopsis" by , The Jesus Discovery shows how a recent major archeological discovery in Jerusalem is revolutionizing our understanding of Jesus and the earliest years of Christianity.Tabor and Jacobovici have examined a sealed first-century tomb in Jerusalem, where they have found the earliest evidence for a belief in the resurrection of Jesus, based on what appears to be the oldest Christian iconography ever discovered. This major new find will be the subject of a primetime National Geographic Society television documentary. The discovery affirms a belief in the resurrection of Jesus that pre-dates the Gospels. It is possible, perhaps even likely, that whoever was buried in this tomb heard Jesus preach.

The stunning discovery also reopens the historical discussion of a nearby tomb previously identified by the authors as the family tomb of Jesus. That tomb contained ossuaries that may be those of Jesus, Mary Magdalene, and members of the family of Jesus. Was Jesus married, and did he father a child who was buried in this tomb?

The new discovery will be the subject of an early November press conference. Publication of the book will coincide with the press conference.

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