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25 Remote Warehouse World History- 1650 to Present

Women and Democracy in Cold War Japan: Princess, Housewife, Beauty Queen (Soas Studies in Modern and Contemporary Japan)

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Women and Democracy in Cold War Japan: Princess, Housewife, Beauty Queen (Soas Studies in Modern and Contemporary Japan) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Gender in Cold War Japan offers a fresh perspective on gender, focusing on the Japanese housewife as a controversial representation of democracy, abundance, leisure, and domesticity in postwar Japan. Examining the shifting personae of the housewife, especially in the appealing visual and written texts of women's magazines, reveals the diverse possibilities of postwar democracy, its potential pleasures, dangers, and reassurances. Jan Bardsley also offers a cross-cultural comparative look at the ways in which the Japanese housewife is measured against equally idealized and ridiculed notions of the modern housewife in the United States, asking how both function as narratives of Japan-U.S. relations during the Cold War.
Gender in Cold War Japan uses the example of the postwar Japanese housewife to answer broader questions about how we can understand contemporary postfeminist concerns with image, self-expression, and consumer choice.

Synopsis:

Women and Democracy in Cold War Japan offers a fresh perspective on gender politics by focusing on the Japanese housewife of the 1950s as a controversial representation of democracy, leisure, and domesticity. Examining the shifting personae of the housewife, especially in the appealing texts of womens magazines, reveals the diverse possibilities of postwar democracy as they were embedded in media directed toward Japanese women. Each chapter explores the contours of a single controversy, including debate over the royal wedding in 1959, the victory of Japan's first Miss Universe, and the unruly desires of postwar women. Jan Bardsley also takes a comparative look at the ways in which the Japanese housewife is measured against equally stereotyped notions of the modern housewife in the United States, asking how both function as narratives of Japan-U.S. relations and gender/class containment during the early Cold War.

About the Author

Jan Bardsley is Associate Professor and Chair in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction
2. Duelling Etiquettes: Mrs. Mogi takes on the Occupationnaires 3. The Housewife Debate 4. What Women Want: The Postwar Appetite 5. Fashioning the People's Princess 1959 6. Shaping Japan's Miss Universe: Beauty Contests and Democracy 7. Democracy in Post-Feminist Japan Bibliography Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9781472526991
Author:
Bardsley, Jan
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Academic
Subject:
Modern - 20th Century
Subject:
Asia - General
Subject:
World History-1650 to Present
Publication Date:
20140831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
9.3 x 6 x 0.8 in 1 lb

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present
History and Social Science » World History » Asia » General
History and Social Science » World History » Japan

Women and Democracy in Cold War Japan: Princess, Housewife, Beauty Queen (Soas Studies in Modern and Contemporary Japan) New Hardcover
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Product details 256 pages Bloomsbury Academic - English 9781472526991 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
Women and Democracy in Cold War Japan offers a fresh perspective on gender politics by focusing on the Japanese housewife of the 1950s as a controversial representation of democracy, leisure, and domesticity. Examining the shifting personae of the housewife, especially in the appealing texts of womens magazines, reveals the diverse possibilities of postwar democracy as they were embedded in media directed toward Japanese women. Each chapter explores the contours of a single controversy, including debate over the royal wedding in 1959, the victory of Japan's first Miss Universe, and the unruly desires of postwar women. Jan Bardsley also takes a comparative look at the ways in which the Japanese housewife is measured against equally stereotyped notions of the modern housewife in the United States, asking how both function as narratives of Japan-U.S. relations and gender/class containment during the early Cold War.
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