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The Namesake: A Portrait of the Film

The Namesake: A Portrait of the Film Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Jhumpa Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies established this young writer as one the most brilliant of her generation. Her stories are one of the very few debut works — and only a handful of collections — to have won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Among the many other awards and honors it received were the New Yorker Debut of the Year award, the PEN/Hemingway Award, and the highest critical praise for its grace, acuity, and compassion in detailing lives transported from India to America. In The Namesake, Lahiri enriches the themes that made her collection an international bestseller: the immigrant experience, the clash of cultures, the conflicts of assimilation, and, most poignantly, the tangled ties between generations. Here again Lahiri displays her deft touch for the perfect detail — the fleeting moment, the turn of phrase — that opens whole worlds of emotion.

The Namesake takes the Ganguli family from their tradition-bound life in Calcutta through their fraught transformation into Americans. On the heels of their arranged wedding, Ashoke and Ashima Ganguli settle together in Cambridge, Massachusetts. An engineer by training, Ashoke adapts far less warily than his wife, who resists all things American and pines for her family. When their son is born, the task of naming him betrays the vexed results of bringing old ways to the new world. Named for a Russian writer by his Indian parents in memory of a catastrophe years before, Gogol Ganguli knows only that he suffers the burden of his heritage as well as his odd, antic name. Lahiri brings great empathy to Gogol as he stumbles along the first-generation path, strewn with conflicting loyalties, comic detours, and wrenching love affairs. With penetrating insight, she reveals not only the defining power of the names and expectations bestowed upon us by our parents, but also the means by which we slowly, sometimes painfully, come to define ourselves. The New York Times has praised Lahiri as a writer of uncommon elegance and poise. The Namesake is a fine-tuned, intimate, and deeply felt novel of identity.

Synopsis:

Original essays and glorious photography, stunningly designed in this unique moviebook from the director of Monsoon Wedding and Vanity Fair—a Fox Searchlight release.

In her essay "Writing and Film," the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Jhumpa Lahiri writes about the experience of seeing her novel "transposed" from paper to film. "Its essence remains, but it inhabits a different realm and must, like a transposed piece of music, conform to a different set of rules. . . . To have someone as devoted and as gifted as Mira reinvent my novel . . . has been a humbling and thrilling passage."

Mira Nair's essay, "Photographs as Inspiration," begins with the provocative comment: "If it weren't for photography, I wouldn't be a filmmaker." She explains how photographs help her crystallize the visual style of her films and which particular photos influenced her vision for The Namesake.

These two essays, written exclusively for this Newmarket Pictorial Moviebook, introduce an amazing panoply of images of people and places shot mainly in New York and Calcutta during the making of the movie, accented by excerpts from Lahiri's bestselling novel. Six Indian and American photographers' works are represented.

Brilliantly illuminating the immigrant experience and the tangled ties between generations, The Namesake tells the story of the Ganguli family, whose move from Calcutta to New York evokes a lifelong balancing act to adapt to a new world while remembering the old. The couple's firstborn, Gogol, and sister Sonia grow up amid these divided loyalties, struggling to find their own identity without losing their heritage. Kal Penn (Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle, Superman Returns) stars as Gogol.

About the Author

Mira Nair is the internationally acclaimed director of Monsoon Wedding, Salaam Bombay!, Vanity Fair, Mississippi Masala, The Perez Family, Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love, and Hysterical Blindness.

Jhumpa Lahiri, the author of Interpreter of Maladies and The Namesake, has been the recipient of the Pulitzer Prize, the PEN/Hemingway Award, and a Guggenheim fellowship.

Photographers represented include Frederick Elmes, Nemai Ghosh, Milan Moudgill, and Dayanita Singh.

Mira Nair is the internationally acclaimed director of Monsoon Wedding, Salaam Bombay!, Vanity Fair, Mississippi Masala, The Perez Family, Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love, and Hysterical Blindness.

Jhumpa Lahiri, the author of Interpreter of Maladies and The Namesake, has been the recipient of the Pulitzer Prize, the PEN/Hemingway Award, and a Guggenheim fellowship.

Photographers represented include Frederick Elmes, Nemai Ghosh, Milan Moudgill, and Dayanita Singh.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781557047311
Subtitle:
A Portrait of the Film
Publisher:
Newmarket Press
Author:
Nair, Mira
Author:
Lahiri, Jhumpa
Subject:
Film and Television-Reference
Subject:
Film - General
Edition Description:
Trade PB
Publication Date:
20061201
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Pages:
144

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Reference
Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Screenplays and Teleplays

The Namesake: A Portrait of the Film
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Product details 144 pages Newmarket Press - English 9781557047311 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Original essays and glorious photography, stunningly designed in this unique moviebook from the director of Monsoon Wedding and Vanity Fair—a Fox Searchlight release.

In her essay "Writing and Film," the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Jhumpa Lahiri writes about the experience of seeing her novel "transposed" from paper to film. "Its essence remains, but it inhabits a different realm and must, like a transposed piece of music, conform to a different set of rules. . . . To have someone as devoted and as gifted as Mira reinvent my novel . . . has been a humbling and thrilling passage."

Mira Nair's essay, "Photographs as Inspiration," begins with the provocative comment: "If it weren't for photography, I wouldn't be a filmmaker." She explains how photographs help her crystallize the visual style of her films and which particular photos influenced her vision for The Namesake.

These two essays, written exclusively for this Newmarket Pictorial Moviebook, introduce an amazing panoply of images of people and places shot mainly in New York and Calcutta during the making of the movie, accented by excerpts from Lahiri's bestselling novel. Six Indian and American photographers' works are represented.

Brilliantly illuminating the immigrant experience and the tangled ties between generations, The Namesake tells the story of the Ganguli family, whose move from Calcutta to New York evokes a lifelong balancing act to adapt to a new world while remembering the old. The couple's firstborn, Gogol, and sister Sonia grow up amid these divided loyalties, struggling to find their own identity without losing their heritage. Kal Penn (Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle, Superman Returns) stars as Gogol.

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