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Daily Life in Immigrant America, 1870-1920: How the Second Great Wave of Immigrants Made Their Way in America (09 Edition)

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Daily Life in Immigrant America, 1870-1920: How the Second Great Wave of Immigrants Made Their Way in America (09 Edition) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Please note that used books may not include additional media (study guides, CDs, DVDs, solutions manuals, etc.) as described in the publisher comments.

Publisher Comments:

The second wave of U.S. immigration, from 1870 to 1920, brought more than 26 million men, women, and children onto American shores. June Granatir Alexander's history of the period underscores the diversity of peoples who came to the United States in these years and emphasizes the important shifts in their geographic origins from northern and western Europe to southern and eastern Europe that led to the distinction between old and new immigrants. Alexander offers an engrossing picture of the immigrants' daily lives, including the settlement patterns of individuals and families, the demographics and characteristics of each of the ethnic groups, and the pressures to Americanize that often made the adjustment to life in a new country so difficult. The approach, similar to David Kyvig's highly successful Daily Life in the United States, 1920 1940 (published by Ivan R. Dee in 2004), presents history with an appealing immediacy, on a level that everyone can understand.

Review:

"The companion volume to James Bergquist's Daily Life in Immigrant America, 1820-1870, Alexander's book falls short of expectations. Exhaustive in its coverage and modest in its aims, the book brings together the latest scholarship about this classic period of immigration for general readers. It covers the shift of immigrants from northern, eastern and southern Europe as well as the opening of immigration from Asia, paying close attention to the anxieties and prejudices that their strangeness aroused. Alexander creates a tale of struggle, adaptation and success, but also of pain and loss. While Alexander claims to avoid an interpretive slant, she often portrays resident Americans in bad light, while laying strong and appropriate emphasis on the immigrants' geographic, occupational and economic mobility. Alexander carefully distinguishes between the customs and situations of the many nationalities that flooded the nation. Notably she examines the move to Western farms-a trend among some immigrants of avoiding cities. Although an overlooked aspect of immigrant history, Alexander often generalizes from the few particular stories she provides. However nicely written, the work lacks the color and life that it might otherwise have had." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Alexander (Russian and East European Studies, U. of Cincinnati) discusses the "Second Great Wave" of immigration in the US from 1870 to 1920 and notes the shift in geographic origins that led to the distinction of this group from the older generation of immigrants. The author describes how this new group came from the south and the east of Europe—as opposed to the north and the west—and offers general readers a vivid and detailed description of settlement patterns, demographics and everyday life. A chronology of this period and 46 illustrations are also included. Annotation ©2009 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The second wave of U.S. immigration, from 1870 to 1920, brought more than 26 million men, women, and children onto American shores. June Alexander's history of the period underscores the diversity of peoples who came to the United States in these years and emphasizes the important shifts in their geographic origins-from northern and western Europe to southern and eastern Europe-that led to the distinction between old and new immigrants.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781566638302
Author:
Alexander, June
Publisher:
Ivan R. Dee Publisher
Author:
Alexander, June Granatir
Subject:
Ethnic Studies - General
Subject:
United States Ethnic relations.
Subject:
United States Emigration and immigration.
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
United States - 19th Century/Gilded Age
Subject:
United States - 20th Century (1900-1945)
Subject:
US History-19th Century
Subject:
US History - 20th Century
Edition Description:
Revised
Publication Date:
20090731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
332
Dimensions:
8.34x5.56x1.04 in. 1.01 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General

Daily Life in Immigrant America, 1870-1920: How the Second Great Wave of Immigrants Made Their Way in America (09 Edition) Used Trade Paper
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Product details 332 pages Ivan R. Dee Publisher - English 9781566638302 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The companion volume to James Bergquist's Daily Life in Immigrant America, 1820-1870, Alexander's book falls short of expectations. Exhaustive in its coverage and modest in its aims, the book brings together the latest scholarship about this classic period of immigration for general readers. It covers the shift of immigrants from northern, eastern and southern Europe as well as the opening of immigration from Asia, paying close attention to the anxieties and prejudices that their strangeness aroused. Alexander creates a tale of struggle, adaptation and success, but also of pain and loss. While Alexander claims to avoid an interpretive slant, she often portrays resident Americans in bad light, while laying strong and appropriate emphasis on the immigrants' geographic, occupational and economic mobility. Alexander carefully distinguishes between the customs and situations of the many nationalities that flooded the nation. Notably she examines the move to Western farms-a trend among some immigrants of avoiding cities. Although an overlooked aspect of immigrant history, Alexander often generalizes from the few particular stories she provides. However nicely written, the work lacks the color and life that it might otherwise have had." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , The second wave of U.S. immigration, from 1870 to 1920, brought more than 26 million men, women, and children onto American shores. June Alexander's history of the period underscores the diversity of peoples who came to the United States in these years and emphasizes the important shifts in their geographic origins-from northern and western Europe to southern and eastern Europe-that led to the distinction between old and new immigrants.
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