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1 Burnside American Studies- Poverty

All You Can Eat: How Hungry Is America?

by

All You Can Eat: How Hungry Is America? Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“His excellent, if statistic-heavy, analysis of 50 years of domestic food policies, All You Can Eat, slams the demonization of the poor as malingerers and lambastes the racism and sexism that underscore this media-reinforced stereotype.”—L Magazine

“The thought-provoking investigation delves into the political and economic impact of food insecurity…Fortunately, Berg is adept at balancing facts with reflection, and humor…book is more of a cross between Super Size Me and Nickel and Dimed in the way he honestly confronts social malfunction.”—Philadelphia City Paper

“[Berg’s] well-considered proposals and optimism are refreshing...Here's hoping [Obama] can address the issue with Berg's balance of rationality and passion.”—Playboy.com

“It’s pure Berg: pointed and up-to-the-moment, with a hint of lefty anger that makes him the darling of hunger fighters everywhere.”—Philadelphia Inquirer

With the biting wit of Super Size Me and the passion of a lifelong activist, Joel Berg has his eye on the growing number of people who are forced to wait in lines at food pantries across the nation—the modern breadline. All You Can Eat reveals that hunger is a problem as American as apple pie, and shows what it is like when your income is not enough to cover rising housing and living costs and put food on the table.

Berg takes to task politicians who remain inactive; the media, which ignores hunger except during holidays and hurricanes; and the food industry, which makes fattening, artery-clogging fast food more accessible to the nation’s poor than healthy fare.

Berg challenges the new president to confront the most unthinkable result of US poverty—hunger—and offers a simple and affordable plan to end it for good. A spirited call to action, All You Can Eat shows how practical solutions for hungry Americans will ultimately benefit America’s economy and all of its citizens.

Joel Berg is the executive director of the New York City Coalition Against Hunger (NYCCAH). He served for eight years under the Clinton administration in Senior Executive Service positions in the US Department of Agriculture, creating a number of high-profile initiatives that fought hunger and implemented national service projects across the country.

Review:

"Berg, executive director of the New York City Coalition Against Hunger, spotlights domestic poverty and hunger in this book that has sharp words for politicians, charities and religious denominations. The author reveals how consistently the federal government has ignored the fact that 35.5 million Americans, including 12.6 million children, don't have enough to eat. Although local governments cared for hungry and poverty-stricken citizens in the pre-Depression years, contemporary politicos in Washington have alternately denied that hunger is a problem, then admitted its existence, then tried to eradicate it with programs that rarely last. Whether he is reasoning why the word hunger is better and more to-the-point than the government's term food insecure, pillorying hunger surveys that don't count the homeless or demonstrating how even well-meaning social services contribute to the problem, Berg is a passionate and articulate advocate. This book provides a range of practical solutions, but gets bogged down by an overwhelming amount of hard data and statistics, which may deter some readers from wanting to take a good-sized bite of it." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Kerr (executive director, New York City Coalition Against Hunger) explores the politics of hunger in the United States. He describes the scope of the problem and its societal impacts, examines the existing hunger safety net and the impact of welfare reform on hunger in the United States, and explores the reasons hunger in the United States doesn't receive greater attention. He also offers solutions, which includes bolstering community food production and marketing and getting the federal government to increase its nutritional assistance program by 41%, which he argues will bring the number of food insecure Americans from 35.5 million down to zero. Annotation ©2009 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

With the biting wit of "Super Size Me" and the passion of a lifelong activist, Berg draws attention to the growing number of people who are forced to wait in lines at food pantries across the nation. The author challenges the new president to confront the result of U.S. poverty--hunger--and offers a simple and affordable plan to end it for good.

Synopsis:

A political insider's exposé on why over 35 million Americans still go hungry in America.

Synopsis:

With the biting wit of Supersize Me and the passion of a lifelong activist, Joel Berg has his eye on the growing number of people who are forced to wait on lines at food pantries across the nation—the modern breadline. All You Can Eat reveals that hunger is a problem as American as apple pie, and shows what it is like when your income is not enough to cover rising housing and living costs and put food on the table.

Berg takes to task politicians who remain inactive; the media, which ignores hunger except during holidays and hurricanes; and the food industry, which makes fattening, artery-clogging fast food more accessible to the nation's poor than healthy fare. He challenges the new president to confront the most unthinkable result of US poverty—hunger—and offers a simple and affordable plan to end it for good.

A spirited call to action, All You Can Eat shows how practical solutions for hungry Americans will ultimately benefit America's economy and all of its citizens.

About the Author

JOEL BERG is Executive Director of the New York City Coalition Against Hunger (NYCCAH). He served for eight years under the Clinton Administration in Senior Executive Service positions in the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), creating a number of high-profile initiatives that fought hunger and implemented national service projects across the country.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781583228548
Author:
Berg, Joel
Publisher:
Seven Stories Press
Author:
Berg, Jo-El
Subject:
Poverty
Subject:
Public Policy - Social Policy
Subject:
Public Policy - Social Services & Welfare
Subject:
American
Subject:
Hunger
Subject:
Public welfare -- United States.
Subject:
Political culture -- United States.
Subject:
Public welfare - United States
Subject:
Non-Classifiable : Non-Classifiable
Subject:
Political culture - United States
Subject:
Practical Politics
Subject:
Policy
Subject:
Sociology-Poverty
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20081131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
B&W photographs, charts, and maps
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
8.1 x 6.6 x 1 in 17 oz

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » American Studies » 80s to Present
History and Social Science » American Studies » General
History and Social Science » American Studies » Poverty
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Children and Family
History and Social Science » Sociology » Poverty

All You Can Eat: How Hungry Is America? Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$12.95 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Seven Stories Press - English 9781583228548 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Berg, executive director of the New York City Coalition Against Hunger, spotlights domestic poverty and hunger in this book that has sharp words for politicians, charities and religious denominations. The author reveals how consistently the federal government has ignored the fact that 35.5 million Americans, including 12.6 million children, don't have enough to eat. Although local governments cared for hungry and poverty-stricken citizens in the pre-Depression years, contemporary politicos in Washington have alternately denied that hunger is a problem, then admitted its existence, then tried to eradicate it with programs that rarely last. Whether he is reasoning why the word hunger is better and more to-the-point than the government's term food insecure, pillorying hunger surveys that don't count the homeless or demonstrating how even well-meaning social services contribute to the problem, Berg is a passionate and articulate advocate. This book provides a range of practical solutions, but gets bogged down by an overwhelming amount of hard data and statistics, which may deter some readers from wanting to take a good-sized bite of it." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , With the biting wit of "Super Size Me" and the passion of a lifelong activist, Berg draws attention to the growing number of people who are forced to wait in lines at food pantries across the nation. The author challenges the new president to confront the result of U.S. poverty--hunger--and offers a simple and affordable plan to end it for good.
"Synopsis" by ,
A political insider's exposé on why over 35 million Americans still go hungry in America.
"Synopsis" by , With the biting wit of Supersize Me and the passion of a lifelong activist, Joel Berg has his eye on the growing number of people who are forced to wait on lines at food pantries across the nation—the modern breadline. All You Can Eat reveals that hunger is a problem as American as apple pie, and shows what it is like when your income is not enough to cover rising housing and living costs and put food on the table.

Berg takes to task politicians who remain inactive; the media, which ignores hunger except during holidays and hurricanes; and the food industry, which makes fattening, artery-clogging fast food more accessible to the nation's poor than healthy fare. He challenges the new president to confront the most unthinkable result of US poverty—hunger—and offers a simple and affordable plan to end it for good.

A spirited call to action, All You Can Eat shows how practical solutions for hungry Americans will ultimately benefit America's economy and all of its citizens.

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