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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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The Hot Kid

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Carl Webster, the hot kid of the marshals service, is polite, respects his elders, and can shoot a man driving away in an Essex at four hundred yards. Carl works out of the Tulsa, Oklahoma, federal courthouse in the 1930s, the period of America's most notorious bank robbers. Dillinger, Baby Face Nelson, those guys.

Carl wants to be America's most famous lawman. He shot his first felon when he was fifteen years old. With a Winchester.

Jack Belmont wants to rob banks, become public enemy number one, and show his dad, an oil millionaire, he can make it on his own. With tommy guns, hot cars, speakeasies, cops and robbers, and a former lawman who believes in vigilante justice, all played out against the flapper period of gun molls and Prohibition, The Hot Kid is Elmore Leonard — the true master — at his best.

Performed by Arliss Howard

Review:

"Leonard's 40th novel, set in the world of 1930s gangsters and gun molls, features characterizations so deft and true you can smell the hair oil on the dudes and the perfume on the dames. Young Carlos Webster tangles with his first gangster at 15, when bank robber Emmet Long robs an Okmulgee, Okla., store, kills an Indian policeman and takes away Carlos's ice cream cone. Seven years later, Carlos, now Carl, a newly minted deputy U.S. marshal, gets his revenge by gunning Long down, an act that wins him the respect of his employers and the adulation of the American public, who follow his every quick-draw exploit in the papers and True Detective magazine. Cinematically, Leonard introduces his characters — Carl's colorful pecan-farmer father, Virgil; Jack Belmont, ne'er-do-well son of a rich oilman; True Detective writer Tony Antonelli; Louly Brown, whose cousin marries Pretty Boy Floyd — in small, self-contained scenes. As the novel moves forward, these characters and others begin to interact, forming liaisons both romantic and criminal. At the stirring conclusion, scores are settled and the good and the bad get sorted out in satisfactorily violent fashion. The writing is pitch-perfect throughout: 'It was his son's quiet tone that made Virgil realize, My Lord, but this boy's got a hard bark on him.' The setting and tone fall somewhere between Leonard's early westerns and his more recent crime novels, but it's all pure Leonard, and that means it's pure terrific." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"[The] hottest kid turns out to be the one doing the writing....[A] quieter, deeper, more sanguine novel than Get Shorty fans are used to, one with more heft but less hair-trigger repartee than Mr. Leonard usually delivers." Janet Maslin, The New York Times

Review:

"You certainly wouldn't expect [Leonard] to have produced his best novel at the age of 79, but he seems to have done it....The Hot Kid is full of textured characters....Leonard's prose is as lean and clean as ever....And the old guy's still got plenty of bite." Stephen King, The Boston Globe

Review:

"As always, Leonard's prose seems effortless, his dialogue is perfect, and his humor is as dry as a moonshine martini....[A] terrific pleasure." Booklist

Review:

"[W]hen Elmore Leonard's new novel The Hot Kid hits the stores...you will see once again that after all the books and all the years, Leonard remains one of the great American writers." New York Daily News

Review:

"Leonard's encyclopedic knowledge of crime history and wry humor make his novels reading experiences to savor....[A] winner in the tradition of Get Shorty and Be Cool." Library Journal

Review:

"[G]enial and laid-back. The whole sepia-toned caravan...is so relaxed that even the most violent felonies may leave you smiling. Leonard's gentle epic is as restorative as a month in the country." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"[B]rims with the sly humor, spare prose and razor dialogue we expect from the master....[A] self-assured work by an author at the top of his game. Leonard isn't trying to impress anyone, except maybe the 1930s boy he once was..." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"[A] novel that, not very far beneath the surface, is all about style, literary and otherwise....The Hot Kid is noirish and even a little pulpy at times, in the fashion of '30s movies and detective magazines." Charles McGrath, The New York Times

Synopsis:

The New York Times bestselling master of the crime novel strikes again with this story, set in Oklahoma in the 1920s, that introduces listeners to one of the toughest lawmen out of the west. Unabridged. 8 CDs.

Synopsis:

Carlos Webester was 15 the day he witnessed his first murder — but it wouldn't be his last. It was also his first introduction to the notorious gunman, Emmet Long. By the time Carlos is 20, he's being sworn in as a deputy US marshall and now goes by the name of Carl. And Emmet Long has hooked up with the no-good son of an oil millionaire and the two of them rob banks. Carl Webster and Emmet Long may be on opposite sides of the law but their long time game of cat and mouse will turn them both into two of the most famous names in crime and punishment.

About the Author

Elmore Leonard has written more than three dozen books during his highly successful writing career, including the bestsellers Tishomingo Blues, Be Cool, Cuba Libre, and Rum Punch, and his most recent critically acclaimed collection of short stories, When the Women Come Out to Dance. Many of his books have been made into movies, including Get Shorty and Out of Sight. He is the recipient of the Grand Master Award of the Mystery Writers of America. He lives with his wife, Christine, in Bloomfield Village, Michigan.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060789985
Read by:
Howard, Arliss
Publisher:
HarperAudio
Read by:
Howard, Arliss
Read:
Howard, Arliss
Author:
Howard, Arliss
Author:
Leonard, Elmore
Author:
Howard Arliss
Subject:
Police
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - General
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - Historical
Subject:
Criminal investigation
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - Hard-Boiled
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Historical fiction
Subject:
Mystery fiction
Subject:
Mystery Historical
Edition Description:
Audio
Abridged:
No
Publication Date:
20050510
Binding:
CD-audio
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Dimensions:
5.84x5.24x1.03 in. .65 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » Historical

The Hot Kid New Other
0 stars - 0 reviews
$36.25 Backorder
Product details pages HarperAudio - English 9780060789985 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Leonard's 40th novel, set in the world of 1930s gangsters and gun molls, features characterizations so deft and true you can smell the hair oil on the dudes and the perfume on the dames. Young Carlos Webster tangles with his first gangster at 15, when bank robber Emmet Long robs an Okmulgee, Okla., store, kills an Indian policeman and takes away Carlos's ice cream cone. Seven years later, Carlos, now Carl, a newly minted deputy U.S. marshal, gets his revenge by gunning Long down, an act that wins him the respect of his employers and the adulation of the American public, who follow his every quick-draw exploit in the papers and True Detective magazine. Cinematically, Leonard introduces his characters — Carl's colorful pecan-farmer father, Virgil; Jack Belmont, ne'er-do-well son of a rich oilman; True Detective writer Tony Antonelli; Louly Brown, whose cousin marries Pretty Boy Floyd — in small, self-contained scenes. As the novel moves forward, these characters and others begin to interact, forming liaisons both romantic and criminal. At the stirring conclusion, scores are settled and the good and the bad get sorted out in satisfactorily violent fashion. The writing is pitch-perfect throughout: 'It was his son's quiet tone that made Virgil realize, My Lord, but this boy's got a hard bark on him.' The setting and tone fall somewhere between Leonard's early westerns and his more recent crime novels, but it's all pure Leonard, and that means it's pure terrific." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[The] hottest kid turns out to be the one doing the writing....[A] quieter, deeper, more sanguine novel than Get Shorty fans are used to, one with more heft but less hair-trigger repartee than Mr. Leonard usually delivers."
"Review" by , "You certainly wouldn't expect [Leonard] to have produced his best novel at the age of 79, but he seems to have done it....The Hot Kid is full of textured characters....Leonard's prose is as lean and clean as ever....And the old guy's still got plenty of bite."
"Review" by , "As always, Leonard's prose seems effortless, his dialogue is perfect, and his humor is as dry as a moonshine martini....[A] terrific pleasure."
"Review" by , "[W]hen Elmore Leonard's new novel The Hot Kid hits the stores...you will see once again that after all the books and all the years, Leonard remains one of the great American writers."
"Review" by , "Leonard's encyclopedic knowledge of crime history and wry humor make his novels reading experiences to savor....[A] winner in the tradition of Get Shorty and Be Cool."
"Review" by , "[G]enial and laid-back. The whole sepia-toned caravan...is so relaxed that even the most violent felonies may leave you smiling. Leonard's gentle epic is as restorative as a month in the country."
"Review" by , "[B]rims with the sly humor, spare prose and razor dialogue we expect from the master....[A] self-assured work by an author at the top of his game. Leonard isn't trying to impress anyone, except maybe the 1930s boy he once was..."
"Review" by , "[A] novel that, not very far beneath the surface, is all about style, literary and otherwise....The Hot Kid is noirish and even a little pulpy at times, in the fashion of '30s movies and detective magazines."
"Synopsis" by , The New York Times bestselling master of the crime novel strikes again with this story, set in Oklahoma in the 1920s, that introduces listeners to one of the toughest lawmen out of the west. Unabridged. 8 CDs.
"Synopsis" by , Carlos Webester was 15 the day he witnessed his first murder — but it wouldn't be his last. It was also his first introduction to the notorious gunman, Emmet Long. By the time Carlos is 20, he's being sworn in as a deputy US marshall and now goes by the name of Carl. And Emmet Long has hooked up with the no-good son of an oil millionaire and the two of them rob banks. Carl Webster and Emmet Long may be on opposite sides of the law but their long time game of cat and mouse will turn them both into two of the most famous names in crime and punishment.
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