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The Time Regulation Institute

by

The Time Regulation Institute Cover

ISBN13: 9780143106739
ISBN10: 0143106732
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A literary discovery: an uproarious tragicomedy of modernization, in its first-ever English translation

 

Perhaps the greatest Turkish novel of the twentieth century, being discovered around the world only now, more than fifty years after its first publication, The Time Regulation Institute is an antic, freewheeling send-up of the modern bureaucratic state.

 

At its center is Hayri Irdal, an infectiously charming antihero who becomes entangled with an eccentric cast of characters—a television mystic, a pharmacist who dabbles in alchemy, a dignitary from the lost Ottoman Empire, a “clock whisperer”—at the Time Regulation Institute, a vast organization that employs a hilariously intricate system of fines for the purpose of changing all the clocks in Turkey to Western time. Recounted in sessions with his psychoanalyst, the story of Hayri Irdals absurdist misadventures plays out as a brilliant allegory of the collision of tradition and modernity, of East and West, infused with a poignant blend of hope for the promise of the future and nostalgia for a simpler time.

Review:

"Reviewed By Saïd Sayrafiezadeh. Two of the greatest fears of any author are obscurity and irrelevance — in that order — and there's not much one can do about either. The former is generally in the hands of the publisher, and the latter in the hands of the reader. This is the gamble all writers take as they commence to pour heart, soul, and years into their work. 'Seventeen copies sold,' Samuel Beckett wrote in Krapp's Last Tape, 'of which eleven at trade price to free circulating libraries beyond the seas,' adding acerbically, 'Getting known.' Turkish author, critic, poet Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar, who died in 1962, is overcoming the first of these writerly ailments, traversing the seas by way of an English-language translation of his 1954 novel, The Time Regulation Institute. Too strong a claim of discovery, however, may unwittingly reveal our orientalist perspective: Tanpinar, virtually unknown in the West, has long been revered in his country. 'I shall leave behind a work,' protagonist Hayri Irdal assures us early in the book, 'that I believe will more or less secure me a place in the annals of history.' Time and its subsequent passage are ostensibly the great preoccupations of this novel. Irdal, put upon and impoverished for much of his life, discovers that happiness lies in his skill for repairing timepieces. We are on the precipice of allegorical territory where the reader may catch glimpses of the bewildered citizens of Franz Kafka and the cracked community of Gabriel García Márquez, and where the Time Regulation Institute itself will be built, founded with the Sisyphean goal of syncing all the clocks of Turkey, thereby ushering the nation into the modern age. But this is not really what the novel is about. In fact, it's difficult to say what the novel is really about. Some of its confounding nature is due to the Western reader's inability to discern, for instance, the historical significance of a character who skips Arabic and Persian words while reading. Most of the confusion, though, is Tanpinar's responsibility; he has assembled a compendium of past events but hasn't dramatized them. After one character commits suicide (off page), another, who happens to be a novelist, decides to incorporate this event into her book. 'Wouldn't any author have done the same?' Irdal asks. No, not if it doesn't pertain to the story. But the story is subsumed by the 'memoir' that Irdal is writing, a problematic framing device for any author, as it can allow for egregious digressions. Meanwhile, the reader waits for the narrative to begin. In An American Tragedy, Theodore Dreiser opened with a maddening 400-page preamble before arriving at the story proper — one that, 90 years later, still packs a punch. In that case, the wait was worth it. In this case, the wait is in vain. Saïd Sayrafiezadeh, the recipient of a Whiting Writers' Award, is the author, most recently, of the story collection Brief Encounters with the Enemy and the memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free. His stories and essays have appeared in the New Yorker, the Paris Review and Granta." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

The first-ever English translation of what is arguably the greatest Turkish novel of the twentieth century

Hayri Idral, the protagonist of this comic masterpiece, is one of the first antiheroes of Turkish literature. Born in poverty in Istanbul, Hayri seeks to improve his station by taking a position at the Time Regulation Institute, a gigantic organization dedicated to adjusting all the countrys watches and clocks to Western time, just as Turkey is abandoning the traditions of the Ottoman Empire. After a crucial discrepancy is revealed, the Institute closes its doors—but its legacy survives: society remains the same even as the corporations workers continue to adhere to its ideals. With satirical brilliance, Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar evokes the anxiety of a country straddling the divide between east and west.

About the Author

Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar (1901–1962) was a poet, short story writer, novelist, essayist, literary historian, and professor. He is considered the most significant Turkish novelist of the twentieth century.

Alexander Dawe is an American translator of French and Turkish. He lives in Istanbul.

Maureen Freely is the principal translator of the Nobel Prize–winning Turkish novelist, Orhan Pamuk,. Born in the U.S., she now lives in England.

Pankaj Mishra is an award-winning novelist and essayist whose writing appears frequently in the New York Review of Books, the Guardian, and the London Review of Books. He lives in London and India.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

lukas, January 28, 2014 (view all comments by lukas)
"I would go so far as to say that is is an age in which bureaucracy has reached its zenith, an age of real freedom." A rediscovered classic by Turkish novelist Ahmet Hamdi Tapinar (1901-1962), who was a major influence on Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk. This new translation (released in a typically well packaged Penguin edition) tells the picaresque, satiric tale set during the modernizing period of Turkey, when they converted to a new alphabet and to Western time. Rich in detail and full of eccentric characters, it plays out like a more comic Kafka at times (the endless bureaucracy) or a more socially conscious Nabokov. Its blend of the personal and the cultural also seems to forecast writers like Rushdie and Ishiguro. A great discovery. (Note:it should not be grouped in "featured biographies," as it is fiction.)
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780143106739
Author:
Tanpinar, Ahmet Hamdi
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Author:
Freely, Maureen
Author:
Mishra, Pankaj
Author:
Dawe, Alexander
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20140131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
7.75 x 5.06 in 1 lb
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Featured Titles » Biography
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Time Regulation Institute New Trade Paper
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Product details 432 pages Penguin Books - English 9780143106739 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Reviewed By Saïd Sayrafiezadeh. Two of the greatest fears of any author are obscurity and irrelevance — in that order — and there's not much one can do about either. The former is generally in the hands of the publisher, and the latter in the hands of the reader. This is the gamble all writers take as they commence to pour heart, soul, and years into their work. 'Seventeen copies sold,' Samuel Beckett wrote in Krapp's Last Tape, 'of which eleven at trade price to free circulating libraries beyond the seas,' adding acerbically, 'Getting known.' Turkish author, critic, poet Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar, who died in 1962, is overcoming the first of these writerly ailments, traversing the seas by way of an English-language translation of his 1954 novel, The Time Regulation Institute. Too strong a claim of discovery, however, may unwittingly reveal our orientalist perspective: Tanpinar, virtually unknown in the West, has long been revered in his country. 'I shall leave behind a work,' protagonist Hayri Irdal assures us early in the book, 'that I believe will more or less secure me a place in the annals of history.' Time and its subsequent passage are ostensibly the great preoccupations of this novel. Irdal, put upon and impoverished for much of his life, discovers that happiness lies in his skill for repairing timepieces. We are on the precipice of allegorical territory where the reader may catch glimpses of the bewildered citizens of Franz Kafka and the cracked community of Gabriel García Márquez, and where the Time Regulation Institute itself will be built, founded with the Sisyphean goal of syncing all the clocks of Turkey, thereby ushering the nation into the modern age. But this is not really what the novel is about. In fact, it's difficult to say what the novel is really about. Some of its confounding nature is due to the Western reader's inability to discern, for instance, the historical significance of a character who skips Arabic and Persian words while reading. Most of the confusion, though, is Tanpinar's responsibility; he has assembled a compendium of past events but hasn't dramatized them. After one character commits suicide (off page), another, who happens to be a novelist, decides to incorporate this event into her book. 'Wouldn't any author have done the same?' Irdal asks. No, not if it doesn't pertain to the story. But the story is subsumed by the 'memoir' that Irdal is writing, a problematic framing device for any author, as it can allow for egregious digressions. Meanwhile, the reader waits for the narrative to begin. In An American Tragedy, Theodore Dreiser opened with a maddening 400-page preamble before arriving at the story proper — one that, 90 years later, still packs a punch. In that case, the wait was worth it. In this case, the wait is in vain. Saïd Sayrafiezadeh, the recipient of a Whiting Writers' Award, is the author, most recently, of the story collection Brief Encounters with the Enemy and the memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free. His stories and essays have appeared in the New Yorker, the Paris Review and Granta." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by ,
The first-ever English translation of what is arguably the greatest Turkish novel of the twentieth century

Hayri Idral, the protagonist of this comic masterpiece, is one of the first antiheroes of Turkish literature. Born in poverty in Istanbul, Hayri seeks to improve his station by taking a position at the Time Regulation Institute, a gigantic organization dedicated to adjusting all the countrys watches and clocks to Western time, just as Turkey is abandoning the traditions of the Ottoman Empire. After a crucial discrepancy is revealed, the Institute closes its doors—but its legacy survives: society remains the same even as the corporations workers continue to adhere to its ideals. With satirical brilliance, Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar evokes the anxiety of a country straddling the divide between east and west.

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