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7 Remote Warehouse Music- History and Criticism

The History of Music Production

by

The History of Music Production Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Richard James Burgess draws on his experience as a producer, a musician, and an author in this history of recorded music, which focuses on the development of music production as both art form and profession. This comprehensive narrative begins in 1860 with the first known recording of an acoustic sound and moves chronologically through the twentieth century, examining the creation of the market for recorded sound, the development of payment structures, the origins of the recording studio and those who work there, and, ultimately, the evolution of the recording industry itself. Burgess charts the highs and lows of the industry through the decades, ending with a discussion of how Web 2.0 has affected music production. The focus remains throughout the book on the role of the music producer, and Burgess offers biographical information on key figures in the history of the industry, including Fred Gaisberg, Phil Spector, and Dr. Dre.

Undergirding Burgess's narrative is the argument that while technology has historically defined the nature of music production, the drive toward greater control over the process, end result, and overall artistry came from producers. In keeping with this unique argument, The History of Music Production incorporates clear yet in-depth discussion of the developmental engagement of technology, business, and art with music production. Burgess builds this history of music production upon the strongest possible foundation: the key transitions, trends, people, and innovations that have been most important in the course of its development over the past 136 years. The result is a deeply knowledgeable book that sketches a critical path in the evolution of music production, and describes and analyzes the impact recording, playback, and disseminative technologies have had on recorded music and music production. Central to the field and a key reference book for students and scholars alike, it will stand as a companion volume to Burgess's noted, multi-edition book The Art of Music Production.

Synopsis:

In The History of Music Production, Richard James Burgess draws on his experience as a producer, musician, and author. Beginning in 1860 with the first known recording of an acoustic sound and moving forward chronologically, Burgess charts the highs and lows of the industry throughout the decades and concludes with a discussion on the present state of music production. Throughout, he tells the story of the music producer as both artist and professional, including biographical sketches of key figures in the history of the industry, including Fred Gaisberg, Phil Spector, and Dr. Dre. Burgess argues that while technology has defined the nature of music production, the drive toward greater control over the process, end result, and overall artistry come from producers. The result is a deeply knowledgeable book that sketches a critical path in the evolution of the field, and analyzes the impact that recording and disseminative technologies have had on music production. A key and handy reference book for students and scholars alike, it stands as an ideal companion to Burgess's noted, multi-edition book The Art of Music Production.

About the Author

Richard James Burgess is Director of Marketing and Sales for Smithsonian Folkways Recordings and author of The Art of Music Production, Fourth Edition (OUP 2013). He also runs his own artist management company, Burgess Worldco. Prior to coming to Smithsonian Folkways, Burgess managed major label artists with top ten chart hits and international touring schedules, including Spandau Ballet, King, Colonel Abrams, Five Star, Living In A Box, Shriekback, and New Edition.

Table of Contents

CONTENTS

PREFACE

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER ONE

Beginnings:

Understanding Sound

Toward Recording

The Phonograph

The First Producers

CHAPTER TWO

The acoustic period:

Acoustic Recording

International Expansion

The Third Major Label

The Sooys

Documentation of Cultural Expression

The End of an Era

CHAPTER THREE

The Electric period:

Toward Electric Recording

Better Sound

Country Music

Further Technological Foundations

The Calm before the Storm

The Thirties and Forties

Radio, Film, and Tape Innovations

CHAPTER FOUR

Economic and Societal Overlay:

Cyclical Decline

One Thing after Another: The Thirties through the War

Recovery

CHAPTER FIVE

The Studio is Interactive

Toward Greater Control

Magnetic Tape Recording

Defining Some Terms

Mastering

Editing

Sound on Sound

Overdubbing

Summing up of Tape's Impact

The Microgroove LP

CHAPTER SIX

The Post World War II Reconstruction of the Recording Industry

After the War

The Boom in Independent Labels

The Fifties

Radio DJs

CHAPTER SEVEN

Mobile Music

More Music for More People

Music Anywhere: Radio on the Move

My Music on the Move

My Music Anywhere

CHAPTER EIGHT

Expanding the Palette

Electric Instruments and Amplifiers

Synthesizers

Genre Hybridization

CHAPTER NINE

Some Key Producers

The Objective

Review of Early Producers

Mitch Miller

Leiber and Stoller

Phil Spector

Sam Phillips

Steve Sholes

Norrie Paramor

Joe Meek

Brian Wilson

George Martin

Holland, Dozier and Holland

Teo Macero

King Tubby

Prince

Rick Rubin

Quincy Jones

Robert John "Mutt" Lange

Dr Dre

Max Martin

CHAPTER TEN

The Sixties and Seventies

Cultural and Creative Revolution

The Sixties

Mix Automation

The Seventies

CHAPTER ELEVEN

Toward the Digital Age

Digital Recording:

Hip Hop:

The State of the Eighties:

The Sound of the Eighties:

The Look of the Eighties:

Shiny Silver Discs:

Singles:

Mixing:

Dance Music:

Remixes:

Further Eighties Developments

Mergers and Acquisitions

The Internet and the World Wide Web

CHAPTER TWELVE

The Nineties

The Corporate State

The Charts and SoundScan

Alternative Rock

Toward Music Online

Progress with Digitized Data

Digital Radio

Millennials

Preparing the way for Napster

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

Periods of standards and stability

Proprietary versus Open Systems

Standards

CHAPTER FOURTEEN

Deconstructing the Studio

Democratizing Technologies

Improvised Environments

When is a Home not a Home?

Freedom

CHAPTER FIFTEEN

Random Access Recording Technology

Why Random Access?

The Beginnings of Random Access for Producers

Drum Machines, Next Generation Sequencers and MIDI

The Beginnings of Random Access Digital Recording

Convergence and Integration

CHAPTER SIXTEEN

Transformative/Disruptive Technologies and the Value of Music

Definitions of Terms

The Industry at the Turn of the 21st Century

Missed Opportunity

Oh wait.

No Big Surprises

What a Great Idea

What Happened to Vertical Integration?

An Idea Whose Time Had Come

Denial and Inaction

The Consequences

The Digital Disruption and Producer Income

Performance Royalties

Direct versus Statutory Licenses

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN

Post-Millennial Business Models

American Idol

Downloads

Streaming Audio

Non interactive streams

Streaming on demand

Web 2.0, Social Networking and Social Media

Commonalities

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN

The Unfinished Work

Sampling, Mash-ups and Remixes

Using Records as Raw Material

Disco

Hip hop

Adapting compositions

Adapting Recordings

The Question of Creativity

The Question of Legality

CONCLUSION

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Product Details

ISBN:
9780199357178
Author:
Burgess, Richard James
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Subject:
History & Criticism *
Subject:
Music | Performance Studies, Applied Music
Subject:
Music -- History and criticism.
Subject:
Music-Recording Techniques
Publication Date:
20140731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
264
Dimensions:
6.1 x 9.2 x 0.8 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » History and Criticism
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Music Business and Songwriting
Arts and Entertainment » Music » Recording Techniques

The History of Music Production New Trade Paper
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Product details 264 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780199357178 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In The History of Music Production, Richard James Burgess draws on his experience as a producer, musician, and author. Beginning in 1860 with the first known recording of an acoustic sound and moving forward chronologically, Burgess charts the highs and lows of the industry throughout the decades and concludes with a discussion on the present state of music production. Throughout, he tells the story of the music producer as both artist and professional, including biographical sketches of key figures in the history of the industry, including Fred Gaisberg, Phil Spector, and Dr. Dre. Burgess argues that while technology has defined the nature of music production, the drive toward greater control over the process, end result, and overall artistry come from producers. The result is a deeply knowledgeable book that sketches a critical path in the evolution of the field, and analyzes the impact that recording and disseminative technologies have had on music production. A key and handy reference book for students and scholars alike, it stands as an ideal companion to Burgess's noted, multi-edition book The Art of Music Production.
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