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4 Remote Warehouse Literary Criticism- General

Exemplary Traits: Reading Characterization in Roman Poetry

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Exemplary Traits: Reading Characterization in Roman Poetry Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

How did Roman poets create character? The mythological figures that dot the landscape of Roman poetry entail their own predetermined plotlines and received characteristics: the idea of a gentle, maternal Medea is as absurd as a spineless and weak Achilles. For Roman poets, the problem is even more acute since they follow on late in a highly developed literary tradition. The fictional characters that populate Roman literature, such as Aeneas and Oedipus, link text and reader in a form of communication that is strikingly different from a first person narrator to an addressee. With Exemplary Traits, Mira Seo addresses this often overlooked question. Her study offers an examination of how Roman poets used models dynamically to create character, and how their referential approach to character reveals them mobilizing the literary tradition. Close readings of Virgil, Lucan, Seneca, and Statius offer a more nuanced discussion of the expectations of both authors and audiences in the Roman world than those currently available in scholarly debate. By tracing the philosophical and rhetorical concepts that underlie the function of characterization, Exemplary Traits allows for a timely reconsideration of it as a fruitful literary technique.

Synopsis:

How did Roman poets create character? Mythological figures entail their own predetermined plotlines and received characteristics: a soft, maternal Medea is as absurd as a spineless Achilles. For the Roman poets, the problem is even more acute since they follow on late in a highly developed literary tradition. The fictional characters that populate Roman literature, such as Aeneas and Oedipus, link text and reader in a form of communication that is different from a first person narrator to an addressee. Exemplary Traits examines how Roman poets used models dynamically to create character, and how their referential approach to character reveals them mobilizing the literary tradition. By tracing the philosophical and rhetorical concepts that underlie characterization as a literary technique, this study illuminates an underestimated aspect of this poetic technique and its relation to a larger intellectual context. Covering a range of authors from Vergil to Statius, J. Mira Seo places the poetics of character in a Roman intellectual environment.

About the Author

J. Mira Seo is Associate Professor in the Humanities at Yale-NUS College, Singapore.

Table of Contents

Abbreviations and Texts

Introduction

1. We'll Always Have Paris: Aeneas and the Roman Legacy

2. Lucan's Cato and the Poetics of Exemplarity

3. Seneca's Oedipus: Characterization and Decorum

4. Parthenopaeus and Mors immatura in Statius' Thebaid

5. Amphiaraus, Predestined Prophet, Didactic Vates

Conclusions

Appendix: Seneca's Hippolytus and Fatal Attraction

Bibliography

Passages Cited

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780199734283
Author:
Seo, J. Mira
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Author:
Seo, Joanne Mira
Subject:
Classics-Medieval and Renaissance General
Subject:
Ancient - Rome
Subject:
Classical Studies | Literary Criticism
Subject:
Literary Criticism : General
Publication Date:
20130631
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
6.3 x 9.3 x 1 in 1 lb

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » Instruments » General
Children's » General
Fiction and Poetry » Classics » General
Fiction and Poetry » Classics » Latin » Criticism
Fiction and Poetry » Classics » Medieval and Renaissance
Health and Self-Help » Health and Medicine » Nursing
History and Social Science » Archaeology » General
History and Social Science » World History » Ancient Near East
Humanities » Literary Criticism » General

Exemplary Traits: Reading Characterization in Roman Poetry New Hardcover
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Product details 240 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780199734283 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , How did Roman poets create character? Mythological figures entail their own predetermined plotlines and received characteristics: a soft, maternal Medea is as absurd as a spineless Achilles. For the Roman poets, the problem is even more acute since they follow on late in a highly developed literary tradition. The fictional characters that populate Roman literature, such as Aeneas and Oedipus, link text and reader in a form of communication that is different from a first person narrator to an addressee. Exemplary Traits examines how Roman poets used models dynamically to create character, and how their referential approach to character reveals them mobilizing the literary tradition. By tracing the philosophical and rhetorical concepts that underlie characterization as a literary technique, this study illuminates an underestimated aspect of this poetic technique and its relation to a larger intellectual context. Covering a range of authors from Vergil to Statius, J. Mira Seo places the poetics of character in a Roman intellectual environment.
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