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The U.S. Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)

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The U.S. Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

For 30 years, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Linda Greenhouse chronicled the activities of the U.S. Supreme Court and its justices as a correspondent for the New York Times. In this Very Short Introduction, she draws on her deep knowledge of the court's history and of its written and unwritten rules to show readers how the Supreme Court really works.

Greenhouse offers a fascinating institutional biography of a place and its people--men and women who exercise great power but whose names and faces are unrecognized by many Americans and whose work often appears cloaked in mystery. How do cases get to the Supreme Court? How do the justices go about deciding them? What special role does the chief justice play? What do the law clerks do? How does the court relate to the other branches of government? Greenhouse answers these questions by depicting the justices as they confront deep constitutional issues or wrestle with the meaning of confusing federal statutes. Throughout, the author examines many individual Supreme Court cases to illustrate points under discussion, ranging from Marbury v. Madison, the seminal case which established judicial review, to the recent District of Columbia v. Heller (2008), which struck down the District of Columbia's gun-control statute and which was, surprisingly, the first time in its history that the Court issued an authoritative interpretation of the Second Amendment. To add perspective, Greenhouse also compares the Court to foreign courts, revealing interesting differences. For instance, no other country in the world has chosen to bestow life tenure on its judges.

A superb overview packed with telling details, this volume offers a matchless introduction to one of the pillars of American government.

Synopsis:

For thirty years, Linda Greenhouse, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The U.S. Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction, chronicled the activities of the justices as the Supreme Court correspondent for the New York Times. In this concise volume, she draws on her deep knowledge of the court's history as well as of its written and unwritten rules to show the reader how the Supreme Court really works.

No mere work of civics, this is an institutional biography of a place and its people - men and women who exercise great power but whose names and faces are unrecognized by many Americans and whose work often appears cloaked in mystery.

How do cases get to the Supreme Court? How do the justices go about deciding them? What special role does the chief justice play? What do the law clerks do? How does the court relate to the other branches of government? Greenhouse answers these questions by depicting the justices as they confront deep constitutional issues or wrestle with the meaning of confusing federal statutes.

The Supreme Court today, housed in a majestic building on Capitol Hill, with more than 400 employees, bears little resemblance to the ill-defined institution the Constitution's Framers launched with the expectation that it would be the weakest, "least dangerous," of the three branches. The court put to use the independence the Framers gave it, and in many ways has continued to define itself. This book is the court's story.

About the Author

Knight Distinguished Journalist in Residence and Joseph Goldstein Lecturer in Law, Yale Law School; former Supreme Court correspondent, The New York Times (1978-2008); winner of the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for beat reporting

Table of Contents

Chapter One: Origins

Chapter Two: The Court at Work (1)

Chapter Three: The Justices

Chapter Four: The Chief Justice

Chapter Five: The Court at Work (2)

Chapter Six: The Court and the Other Branches

Chapter Seven: The Court and the Public

Chapter Eight: The Court and the World

References

Further Reading

Appendix 1: Article III, U.S. Constitution

Appendix 2: The Supreme Court's Rules (excerpts)

Appendix 3: Chart of the Justices

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780199754540
Author:
Greenhouse, Linda
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Subject:
Courts
Subject:
Law | Constitutional Law
Subject:
Law-Legal Guides and Reference
Subject:
Americana-General
Subject:
Politics - General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20120331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
10 b/w images
Pages:
144
Dimensions:
4.4 x 6.8 x 0.4 in 0.25 lb

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Related Subjects

Business » Business Law
History and Social Science » Americana » General
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History and Social Science » World History » Oxford Very Short Introductions

The U.S. Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) New Trade Paper
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Product details 144 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780199754540 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , For thirty years, Linda Greenhouse, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The U.S. Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction, chronicled the activities of the justices as the Supreme Court correspondent for the New York Times. In this concise volume, she draws on her deep knowledge of the court's history as well as of its written and unwritten rules to show the reader how the Supreme Court really works.

No mere work of civics, this is an institutional biography of a place and its people - men and women who exercise great power but whose names and faces are unrecognized by many Americans and whose work often appears cloaked in mystery.

How do cases get to the Supreme Court? How do the justices go about deciding them? What special role does the chief justice play? What do the law clerks do? How does the court relate to the other branches of government? Greenhouse answers these questions by depicting the justices as they confront deep constitutional issues or wrestle with the meaning of confusing federal statutes.

The Supreme Court today, housed in a majestic building on Capitol Hill, with more than 400 employees, bears little resemblance to the ill-defined institution the Constitution's Framers launched with the expectation that it would be the weakest, "least dangerous," of the three branches. The court put to use the independence the Framers gave it, and in many ways has continued to define itself. This book is the court's story.

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