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4 Remote Warehouse Judaism- History

New Heavens and a New Earth: The Jewish Reception of Copernican Thought

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New Heavens and a New Earth: The Jewish Reception of Copernican Thought Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this ground-breaking study of the Jewish reception of the Copernican revolution, Jeremy Brown examines four hundred years of Jewish writings on the Copernican model. Brown shows the ways in which Jews ignored, rejected, or accepted the Copernican model, and the theological and societal underpinnings of their choices.

Throughout New Heavens and a New Earth are deft historical studies of such colorful figures as Joseph Delmedigo, the first Jewish Copernican and a student of Galileo's; Tuviah Cohen, who called Copernicus the "Son of Satan;" Zelig Slonimski, author of a collection of essays on Halley's Comet; and contemporary Jewish thinkers who use Einstein's Theory of Relativity to argue that the Earth does not actually revolve around the sun. Brown also provides insightful comparisons of concurrent Jewish and Christian writings on Copernicus, demonstrating that the Jewish reception of Copernicus was largely dependent on local factors and responses.

The book concludes with the important lessons to be learned from the history of the Jewish reception of Copernican thought, and shows how religions make room for new scientific descriptions of reality while upholding their most cherished beliefs.

Synopsis:

In this ground-breaking study of the Jewish reception of the Copernican revolution, Jeremy Brown examines four hundred years of Jewish writings on the Copernican model. Brown shows the ways in which Jews ignored, rejected, or accepted the Copernican model, and the theological and societal underpinnings of their choices.

Throughout New Heavens and a New Earth are deft historical studies of such colorful figures as Joseph Delmedigo, the first Jewish Copernican and a student of Galileo's; Tuviah Cohen, who called Copernicus the "Son of Satan;" Zelig Slonimski, author of a collection of essays on Halley's Comet; and contemporary Jewish thinkers who use Einstein's Theory of Relativity to argue that the Earth does not actually revolve around the sun. Brown also provides insightful comparisons of concurrent Jewish and Christian writings on Copernicus, demonstrating that the Jewish reception of Copernicus was largely dependent on local factors and responses.

The book concludes with the important lessons to be learned from the history of the Jewish reception of Copernican thought, and shows how religions make room for new scientific descriptions of reality while upholding their most cherished beliefs.

About the Author

Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Research Director for the Development of Emergency Medicine, George Washington University

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1 - Nicolas Copernicus and His Revolution

Chapter 2 - The Talmudic View of the Universe

Chapter 3 - David Gans and the First Mention of Copernicus in Hebrew Literature

Chapter 4 - The First Jewish Copernican: Rabbi Joseph Solomon Delmedigo

Chapter 5 - Copernicus Is the Son of Satan. The First Jewish Rejections of Copernicus

Chapter 6 - David Nieto and Copernicanism in London

Chapter 7 - The Jewish Encyclopedias

Chapter 8 - The Eighteenth Century. Jews and Copernicus in the Newtonian Era

Chapter 9 - I Have Written a Book For the Young People. David Friesenhausen's Mosdot Tevel

Chapter 10 - The Nineteenth Century: Copernicus Without Hesitation

Chapter 11 - Let Copernicus and a Thousand Like Him Be Removed From the World. Reuven Landau's Rejection

Chapter 12 - The Modern Period

Chapter 13 - Relativity and Contemporary Jewish Geocentrists

Chapter 14 - Conclusions

Appendix

Bibliography

Product Details

ISBN:
9780199754793
Author:
Brown, Jeremy
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Subject:
Judaism - History
Subject:
Religion & Theology | Judaism
Subject:
Judaism - Theology
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20130531
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
26 illus.
Pages:
416
Dimensions:
6.3 x 9.3 x 1.1 in 1.6 lb

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Religion » Judaism » History
Religion » Judaism » Theology
Religion » World Religions » Religion and Science

New Heavens and a New Earth: The Jewish Reception of Copernican Thought New Hardcover
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$90.25 In Stock
Product details 416 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780199754793 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In this ground-breaking study of the Jewish reception of the Copernican revolution, Jeremy Brown examines four hundred years of Jewish writings on the Copernican model. Brown shows the ways in which Jews ignored, rejected, or accepted the Copernican model, and the theological and societal underpinnings of their choices.

Throughout New Heavens and a New Earth are deft historical studies of such colorful figures as Joseph Delmedigo, the first Jewish Copernican and a student of Galileo's; Tuviah Cohen, who called Copernicus the "Son of Satan;" Zelig Slonimski, author of a collection of essays on Halley's Comet; and contemporary Jewish thinkers who use Einstein's Theory of Relativity to argue that the Earth does not actually revolve around the sun. Brown also provides insightful comparisons of concurrent Jewish and Christian writings on Copernicus, demonstrating that the Jewish reception of Copernicus was largely dependent on local factors and responses.

The book concludes with the important lessons to be learned from the history of the Jewish reception of Copernican thought, and shows how religions make room for new scientific descriptions of reality while upholding their most cherished beliefs.

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