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Chromatic Algorithms: Synthetic Color, Computer Art, and Aesthetics After Code

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Chromatic Algorithms: Synthetic Color, Computer Art, and Aesthetics After Code Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

These days, we take for granted that our computer screensand#151;and even our phonesand#151;will show us images in vibrant full color. Digital color is a fundamental part of how we use our devices, but we never give a thought to how it is produced or how it came about.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

Chromatic Algorithms reveals the fascinating history behind digital color, tracing it from the work of a few brilliant computer scientists and experimentally minded artists in the late 1960s and early and#145;70s through to its appearance in commercial software in the early 1990s. Mixing philosophy of technology, aesthetics, and media analysis, Carolyn Kane shows how revolutionary the earliest computer-generated colors wereand#151;built with the massive postwar number-crunching machines, these first examples of and#147;computer artand#8221; were so fantastic that artists and computer scientists regarded them as psychedelic, even revolutionary, harbingers of a better future for humans and machines. But, Kane shows, the explosive growth of personal computing and its accompanying need for off-the-shelf software led to standardization and the gradual closing of the experimental field in which computer artists had thrived.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

Even so, the gap between the bright, bold presence of color onscreen and the increasing abstraction of its underlying code continues to lure artists and designers from a wide range of fields, and Kane draws on their work to pose fascinating questions about the relationships among art, code, science, and media in the twenty-first century.

Synopsis:

The first computer-generated color was developed in the late 1960s, and many viewed these electronic hues as revolutionary, psychedelic vehicles to fuse human and machine consciousness and expand the perceptual field in art, science, and industry. Chromatic Algorithms explores the ways in which a few brilliant computer scientists and experimentally minded artists transformed postwar number crunching machines into tools for producing luminous colors. Their radical new and#147;Computer Artand#8221; seemed to open the doors onto an unlimited field of aesthetic possibility. However, with the advent of personal computing, the Graphical User Interface (GUI), and the standardization of digital color, this experimental field all but closed.

By the 2000s, luscious and automated hyper-colors enticed artists, designers, architects, animators, and others to work with digital colors in many creative ways. Yet in this shift to industry standard digital color, a gap emerged between the colors, growing brighter and bolder on screens and in public spaces, and their corresponding abstraction in code. How and why did the user interface become more transparent just as its underlying operations became more complex and opaque? Can this fundamental disparity be located in new media art, and if so, what critical value does it offer? To answer these questions and more, Carolyn L. Kane boldly moves across the philosophy of technology, aesthetics, color studies, and new media history and theory.

About the Author

Carolyn L. Kane is assistant professor of film and media at Hunter College, City University of New York.

Table of Contents

Introduction. How Color Became Code

and#160;

Part 1. Chromatic Visions (400 B.C.-1969)

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Colors Sacred and Synthetic

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Classical and Modern Color: Plato through Goethe

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Industrial Color: Synthetics through Day-Glo Psychedelics

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Synthetic Color in Video Synthesis

and#160;

Part 2. Disciplining Color: Encounters with Number and Code (1965-1984)

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Informatic Color and Aesthetic Transformation in Early Computer Art

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Collaborative Computer Art and Experimental Color Systems

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; From Chromakey to the Alpha Channel

and#160;

Part 3. and#147;Transparentand#8221; Screens for Opaque Ontology (1984-2007)

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Digital Infared as Algorithmic Lifeworld

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; The Photoshop Cinema

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160; Postscript. A New Dark Age

and#160;

Acknowledgements

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226002736
Author:
Kane, Carolyn L.
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Subject:
History
Subject:
History of Science-General
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20140831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
114 color plates, 15 halftones, 3 line d
Pages:
328
Dimensions:
10 x 7 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Color Theory
Arts and Entertainment » Art » Color and Perspective
Arts and Entertainment » Art » Computers In Art
Computers and Internet » Graphics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » General

Chromatic Algorithms: Synthetic Color, Computer Art, and Aesthetics After Code New Hardcover
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$50.95 In Stock
Product details 328 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226002736 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
The first computer-generated color was developed in the late 1960s, and many viewed these electronic hues as revolutionary, psychedelic vehicles to fuse human and machine consciousness and expand the perceptual field in art, science, and industry. Chromatic Algorithms explores the ways in which a few brilliant computer scientists and experimentally minded artists transformed postwar number crunching machines into tools for producing luminous colors. Their radical new and#147;Computer Artand#8221; seemed to open the doors onto an unlimited field of aesthetic possibility. However, with the advent of personal computing, the Graphical User Interface (GUI), and the standardization of digital color, this experimental field all but closed.

By the 2000s, luscious and automated hyper-colors enticed artists, designers, architects, animators, and others to work with digital colors in many creative ways. Yet in this shift to industry standard digital color, a gap emerged between the colors, growing brighter and bolder on screens and in public spaces, and their corresponding abstraction in code. How and why did the user interface become more transparent just as its underlying operations became more complex and opaque? Can this fundamental disparity be located in new media art, and if so, what critical value does it offer? To answer these questions and more, Carolyn L. Kane boldly moves across the philosophy of technology, aesthetics, color studies, and new media history and theory.

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