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Satires and Epistles

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Satires and Epistles Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Satires and Epistles span Horace's career as a satirist, critic, and master of lyric poetry-as man of the world, friend of the great, and relentless enemy of the mediocre. "Horace," writes translator Smith Palmer Bovie, "is the best antidote in the world for anxiety. His Satires and Epistles demonstrate the good-humored freedom of a man who has cheerfully assumed the responsibility for making his own life not so much a 'success' as the occasion for a true enjoyment of virtue and knowledge."

Bovie's impeccable translations-along with the University of Chicago Press's edition of the Odes and Epodes-offer the reader a complete and modern Horace.

Synopsis:

The Satires and Epistles span Horace's career as a satirist, critic, and master of lyric poetry-as man of the world, friend of the great, and relentless enemy of the mediocre. "Horace," writes translator Smith Palmer Bovie, "is the best antidote in the world for anxiety. His Satires and Epistles demonstrate the good-humored freedom of a man who has cheerfully assumed the responsibility for making his own life not so much a 'success' as the occasion for a true enjoyment of virtue and knowledge."

Bovie's impeccable translations-along with the University of Chicago Press's edition of the Odes and Epodes-offer the reader a complete and modern Horace.

About the Author

Smith Palmer Bovie (1917-1999) taught English at Columbia University and classics at Indiana University and Rutgers University. In addition to Horace, he also translated works by Virgil, Cicero, Napoleon, and others.

Table of Contents

General Introduction

 

Satires

Introduction to Book One

1. Don't go overboard

2. Adultery is childish

3. But no one asked you to sing

4. And when I have time, I put something down on paper

5. From Rome to Brindisi, with stops

6. I am only a freedman's son

7. King Rex: off with his head

8. A little Walpurgisnacht music

9. Bored to distraction

10. The fine art of criticism

 

Introduction to Book Two

1. To write or not to write? (A talk with my lawyer)

2. Plain living and high thinking

3. A Stoic sermon

4. Gourmet à la mode

5. How to recoup your losses

6. The town mouse and the country mouse

7. My slave is free to speak up for himself

8. Nasidienus has some friend in for dinner

 

Epistles

Introduction to Book One

1. To Maecenas (20 B.C.): Philosophy has clipped my wings

2. To Lollius Maximus (22 B.C.): Homer teaches us all how to live, but we have to do it ourselves

3. To Julius Florus, campaigning with Tiberius (20 B.C.): How are you out there with all those officers? What are you doing with your spare time?

4. To Albius Tibullus (24 B.C.): Don't be depressed, my friend. I'm not!

5. To Torquatus (22 B.C.): Come to dinner tonight, the twenty-second

6. To Numicius (no date): Nil admirari

7. To Maecenas (no date): I won't be coming to town this winter. Sorry!

8. To Celsus Albinovanus, campaigning with Tiberius (20 B.C.): I'm depressed. Hope you aren't

9. To Tiberius (20 B.C.): Recommending to you my friend Septimius

10. To Aristius Fuscus (21 B.C.): You can leave the city. I'll take the country

11. To Bullatius (no date): How was your trip?

12. To Iccius, in Sicily (20 B.C.): Hope you are doing well in your work for the Department of External Revenue. But do look up Pompeius Grosphus. Here's the latest news from Rome

13. To Vinius Asina (23 B.C.): Please give these does to Augustus, and watch what you're doing!

14. To the foreman on my farm (no date): You can have the city; I'll take the country

15. To Numonius Vala (22 B.C.): I'm planning to come south for the winter. What's it like down there?

16. To Quinctius (25 B.C.): Virtue is wisdom

17. To Scaeva (no date): How to win friends and influence patrons

18. To Lollius Maximus (20 B.C.): How to influence patrons: be yourself!

19. To Maecenas (20 B.C.): My lyric poetry is not derivative, it's contributive

20. To my first book of epistles (20 B.C.): I guess it's up to you to make your own way in the world

 

Introduction to Book Two

1. The Epistle to Augustus: The literary tradition, and the role of our Roman writers

2. To Julius Florus, still campaigning with Tiberius: Literary ambitions, and how to survive them

3. The art of poetry

 

Notes

Product Details

ISBN:
9780226067773
Translator:
Bovie, Smith Palmer
Author:
Bovie, Smith Palmer
Author:
Horace
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Subject:
Literature
Subject:
Ancient, Classical & Medieval
Subject:
Classics-General
Edition Description:
Paperback
Publication Date:
20020431
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
Professional and scholarly
Language:
English
Pages:
326
Dimensions:
8 x 5.25 in

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Classics » General
Fiction and Poetry » Classics » Latin » General

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Product details 326 pages University of Chicago Press - English 9780226067773 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,
The Satires and Epistles span Horace's career as a satirist, critic, and master of lyric poetry-as man of the world, friend of the great, and relentless enemy of the mediocre. "Horace," writes translator Smith Palmer Bovie, "is the best antidote in the world for anxiety. His Satires and Epistles demonstrate the good-humored freedom of a man who has cheerfully assumed the responsibility for making his own life not so much a 'success' as the occasion for a true enjoyment of virtue and knowledge."

Bovie's impeccable translations-along with the University of Chicago Press's edition of the Odes and Epodes-offer the reader a complete and modern Horace.

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