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Subaltern Studies #11: Community, Gender and Violence: Subaltern Studies XI

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Subaltern Studies #11: Community, Gender and Violence: Subaltern Studies XI Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In its early phase, "Subaltern Studies" dealt extensively with the issue of community and violence in the context of peasant uprisings. The present volume concentrates on gender and national politics and introduces a wide range of new issues raised by the relations between community, gender and violence.

Synopsis:

"Subaltern Studies" was launched in 1982 under the editorship of Ranajit Guha as a critique of the two dominant approaches to history-writing in South Asia -the colonialist and the nationalist. Rejecting both approaches as elitist, "Subaltern Studies" attempted to recover that space of politics where dominated and marginal groups -the subaltern classes -had tried to assert their own initiative.

Synopsis:

"Subaltern Studies" was launched in 1982 under the editorship of Ranajit Guha as a critique of the two dominant approaches to history-writing in South Asia — the colonialist and the nationalist. Rejecting both approaches as ilitist, "Subaltern Studies" attempted to recover that space of politics where dominated and marginal groups — the subaltern classes — had tried to assert their own initiative.

In its early phase, "Subaltern Studies" dealt extensively with the issue of community and violence in the context of peasant uprisings. Once the problems of peasant involvement in the modern politics of the nation were subjected to the same critical scrutiny, complexities in that relationship began to emerge. A new dimension was introduced when gender and national politics came to be taken seriously and in the present volume the whole range of new issues raised by the relations between community, gender and violence are addressed.

The question of women and the nation, especially among minorities, features strongly in this work. Qadri Ismail examines the claims of Tamil nationalism in Sri Lanka from the standpoint of the Southern Tamil woman; Aamir Mufti looks not at the familiar gendered figure of the nation as mother but, from the standpoint of the rejected minority, at the brutalized prostitute; while Tejaswini Niranjana writes on the "new woman" in contemporary Indian cinema.

Further chapters look at women and minorities in the context of the law: Flavia Agnes examines the colonial and nationalist histories of the Hindu law of marriage and women's property, Nivedita Menon critically reviews the Indian debate over the universal civil code, and David Scott discusses, with an eyeto Sri Lanka, the concept of minority rights within modern theories of citizenship.

The issue of violence is taken up by Satish Deshpande in his study of the imagined space within which the new Hindu Right seeks to assert its dominance, and by Pradeep Jeganathan in his exploration of violence in the cultivation of masculinity. In her conclusion, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak considers the position within a globalized economic space of the "new subaltern" — the Third World laboring woman.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780231123150
Editor:
Chatterjee, Partha
Editor:
Jeganathan, Pradeep
Editor:
Chatterjee, Partha
Editor:
Jeganathan, Pradeep
Author:
Chatterjee, Partha
Author:
Subaltern Studies Conference
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Sri lanka
Subject:
India
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Women's Studies
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Subject:
Minorities
Subject:
Asia - India & South Asia
Subject:
Women's Studies - General
Subject:
India Politics and government.
Subject:
Women -- India -- Social conditions.
Subject:
anthropology;cultural anthropology
Edition Description:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Series:
Subaltern Studies
Series Volume:
RP-59911
Publication Date:
20011131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
9.06x5.94x1.09 in. 1.15 lbs.

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Anthropology » General
History and Social Science » Asia » India » Ancient and General
History and Social Science » Feminist Studies » General
History and Social Science » Gender Studies » Womens Studies
History and Social Science » World History » Asia » General
History and Social Science » World History » India

Subaltern Studies #11: Community, Gender and Violence: Subaltern Studies XI New Trade Paper
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$37.50 In Stock
Product details 192 pages Columbia University Press - English 9780231123150 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Subaltern Studies" was launched in 1982 under the editorship of Ranajit Guha as a critique of the two dominant approaches to history-writing in South Asia -the colonialist and the nationalist. Rejecting both approaches as elitist, "Subaltern Studies" attempted to recover that space of politics where dominated and marginal groups -the subaltern classes -had tried to assert their own initiative.
"Synopsis" by , "Subaltern Studies" was launched in 1982 under the editorship of Ranajit Guha as a critique of the two dominant approaches to history-writing in South Asia — the colonialist and the nationalist. Rejecting both approaches as ilitist, "Subaltern Studies" attempted to recover that space of politics where dominated and marginal groups — the subaltern classes — had tried to assert their own initiative.

In its early phase, "Subaltern Studies" dealt extensively with the issue of community and violence in the context of peasant uprisings. Once the problems of peasant involvement in the modern politics of the nation were subjected to the same critical scrutiny, complexities in that relationship began to emerge. A new dimension was introduced when gender and national politics came to be taken seriously and in the present volume the whole range of new issues raised by the relations between community, gender and violence are addressed.

The question of women and the nation, especially among minorities, features strongly in this work. Qadri Ismail examines the claims of Tamil nationalism in Sri Lanka from the standpoint of the Southern Tamil woman; Aamir Mufti looks not at the familiar gendered figure of the nation as mother but, from the standpoint of the rejected minority, at the brutalized prostitute; while Tejaswini Niranjana writes on the "new woman" in contemporary Indian cinema.

Further chapters look at women and minorities in the context of the law: Flavia Agnes examines the colonial and nationalist histories of the Hindu law of marriage and women's property, Nivedita Menon critically reviews the Indian debate over the universal civil code, and David Scott discusses, with an eyeto Sri Lanka, the concept of minority rights within modern theories of citizenship.

The issue of violence is taken up by Satish Deshpande in his study of the imagined space within which the new Hindu Right seeks to assert its dominance, and by Pradeep Jeganathan in his exploration of violence in the cultivation of masculinity. In her conclusion, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak considers the position within a globalized economic space of the "new subaltern" — the Third World laboring woman.

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