Murakami Sale
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | August 18, 2014

Ian Leslie: IMG Empathic Curiosity



Today, we wonder anxiously if digital media is changing our brains. But if there's any time in history when our mental operations changed... Continue »
  1. $18.89 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$36.95
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
10 Local Warehouse Engineering- History
4 Remote Warehouse Art- General

More copies of this ISBN

Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo

by

Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt; When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stepped onto the lunar surface in July of 1969, they wore spacesuits made by Playtex: twenty-one layers of fabric, each with a distinct yet interrelated function, custom-sewn for them by seamstresses whose usual work was fashioning bras and girdles. This book is the story of that spacesuit. It is a story of the triumph over the military-industrial complex by the International Latex Corporation, best known by its consumer brand of "Playtex" — a victory of elegant softness over engineered hardness, of adaptation over cybernetics. andlt;/Pandgt;andlt;Pandgt;Playtex's spacesuit went up against hard armor-like spacesuits designed by military contractors and favored by NASA's engineers. It was only when those attempts failed--when traditional engineering firms could not integrate the body into mission requirements--that Playtex, with its intimate expertise, got the job. andlt;/Pandgt;andlt;Pandgt;In Spacesuit, Nicholas de Monchaux tells the story of the twenty-one-layer spacesuit in twenty-one chapters addressing twenty-one topics relevant to the suit, the body, and the technology of the twentieth century. He touches, among other things, on eighteenth-century androids, Christian Dior's New Look, Atlas missiles, cybernetics and cyborgs, latex, JFK's carefully cultivated image, the CBS lunar broadcast soundstage, NASA's Mission Control, and the applications of Apollo-style engineering to city planning. The twenty-one-layer spacesuit, de Monchaux argues, offers an object lesson. It tells us about redundancy and interdependence and about the distinctions between natural and man-made complexity; it teaches us to know the virtues of adaptation and to see the future as a set of possibilities rather than a scripted scenario.andlt;/Pandgt;

Review:

"Berkeley architecture professor de Monchaux's thorough and artful history of the American spacesuit takes readers at a leisurely pace through the past, from the first air travel (via balloon) through fashions of the mid-20th century and manned missions into outer space. De Monchaux dissects the many materials and manufacturing processes involved in construction of the precision-stitched latex spacesuit, the 'simultaneous flexibility and precision' of which has kept it popular, and the AX-2, a hard suit 'container, not clothing.' De Monchaux situates readers in the culture of the time, with discussions of the stewardess as icon (the astronaut's 'airborne counterpart'), JFK's medical treatments, and IBM vs. DEC (defunct by 1998) computers that paint a full backstory of every element, from 'a brief history of rubber' and its pre-spacesuit application to girdles to fascinating details of obtaining transmissions from space, creating a wholly absorbing capsule of our history. 'n ‘suiting' man to an environment defined by its hostility to him, the spacesuit itself would come to play a central role in discussions of man both made and remade, earthly and, it almost seemed, divine.' Photos. (Mar.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

How the twenty-one-layer Apollo spacesuit, made by Playtex, was a triumph of intimacy over engineering.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;How the twenty-one-layer Apollo spacesuit, made by Playtex, was a triumph of intimacy over engineering.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stepped onto the lunar surface in July of 1969, they wore spacesuits made by Playtex: twenty-one layers of fabric, each with a distinct yet interrelated function, custom-sewn for them by seamstresses whose usual work was fashioning bras and girdles. This book is the story of those spacesuits. It is a story of the Playtex Corporation's triumph over the military-industrial complex--a victory of elegant softness over engineered hardness, of adaptation over cybernetics.

Synopsis:

When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stepped onto the lunar surface in July of 1969, they wore spacesuits made by Playtex: twenty-one layers of fabric, each with a distinct yet interrelated function, custom-sewn for them by seamstresses whose usual work was fashioning bras and girdles. This book is the story of that spacesuit. It is a story of the triumph over the military-industrial complex by the International Latex Corporation, best known by its consumer brand of "Playtex" — a victory of elegant softness over engineered hardness, of adaptation over cybernetics.

Playtex's spacesuit went up against hard armor-like spacesuits designed by military contractors and favored by NASA's engineers. It was only when those attempts failed--when traditional engineering firms could not integrate the body into mission requirements--that Playtex, with its intimate expertise, got the job.

In Spacesuit, Nicholas de Monchaux tells the story of the twenty-one-layer spacesuit in twenty-one chapters addressing twenty-one topics relevant to the suit, the body, and the technology of the twentieth century. He touches, among other things, on eighteenth-century androids, Christian Dior's New Look, Atlas missiles, cybernetics and cyborgs, latex, JFK's carefully cultivated image, the CBS lunar broadcast soundstage, NASA's Mission Control, and the applications of Apollo-style engineering to city planning. The twenty-one-layer spacesuit, de Monchaux argues, offers an object lesson. It tells us about redundancy and interdependence and about the distinctions between natural and man-made complexity; it teaches us to know the virtues of adaptation and to see the future as a set of possibilities rather than a scripted scenario.

About the Author

Nicholas de Monchaux is Assistant Professor of Architecture at the College of Environmental Design, University of California, Berkeley. His work has appeared in the architectural journal Log, the New York Times, the New York Times Magazine, Architectural Digest, and other publications.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262015202
Subtitle:
Fashioning Apollo
Author:
De Monchaux, Nicholas
Author:
de Monchaux, Nicholas
Author:
Monchaux, Nicholas de
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Engineering -- History.
Series:
Spacesuit
Publication Date:
20110318
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
26 color illus., 114 b, &, w illus.
Pages:
380
Dimensions:
9 x 7 in

Other books you might like

  1. The Death and Life of Great American... Used Trade Paper $11.95
  2. Ai Weiwei's Blog: Writings,... Used Trade Paper $17.50

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Design History
Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
Engineering » Engineering » History
Reference » Science Reference » Technology
Science and Mathematics » Astronomy » Space Exploration

Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$36.95 In Stock
Product details 380 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262015202 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Berkeley architecture professor de Monchaux's thorough and artful history of the American spacesuit takes readers at a leisurely pace through the past, from the first air travel (via balloon) through fashions of the mid-20th century and manned missions into outer space. De Monchaux dissects the many materials and manufacturing processes involved in construction of the precision-stitched latex spacesuit, the 'simultaneous flexibility and precision' of which has kept it popular, and the AX-2, a hard suit 'container, not clothing.' De Monchaux situates readers in the culture of the time, with discussions of the stewardess as icon (the astronaut's 'airborne counterpart'), JFK's medical treatments, and IBM vs. DEC (defunct by 1998) computers that paint a full backstory of every element, from 'a brief history of rubber' and its pre-spacesuit application to girdles to fascinating details of obtaining transmissions from space, creating a wholly absorbing capsule of our history. 'n ‘suiting' man to an environment defined by its hostility to him, the spacesuit itself would come to play a central role in discussions of man both made and remade, earthly and, it almost seemed, divine.' Photos. (Mar.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , How the twenty-one-layer Apollo spacesuit, made by Playtex, was a triumph of intimacy over engineering.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;How the twenty-one-layer Apollo spacesuit, made by Playtex, was a triumph of intimacy over engineering.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stepped onto the lunar surface in July of 1969, they wore spacesuits made by Playtex: twenty-one layers of fabric, each with a distinct yet interrelated function, custom-sewn for them by seamstresses whose usual work was fashioning bras and girdles. This book is the story of those spacesuits. It is a story of the Playtex Corporation's triumph over the military-industrial complex--a victory of elegant softness over engineered hardness, of adaptation over cybernetics.
"Synopsis" by , When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stepped onto the lunar surface in July of 1969, they wore spacesuits made by Playtex: twenty-one layers of fabric, each with a distinct yet interrelated function, custom-sewn for them by seamstresses whose usual work was fashioning bras and girdles. This book is the story of that spacesuit. It is a story of the triumph over the military-industrial complex by the International Latex Corporation, best known by its consumer brand of "Playtex" — a victory of elegant softness over engineered hardness, of adaptation over cybernetics.

Playtex's spacesuit went up against hard armor-like spacesuits designed by military contractors and favored by NASA's engineers. It was only when those attempts failed--when traditional engineering firms could not integrate the body into mission requirements--that Playtex, with its intimate expertise, got the job.

In Spacesuit, Nicholas de Monchaux tells the story of the twenty-one-layer spacesuit in twenty-one chapters addressing twenty-one topics relevant to the suit, the body, and the technology of the twentieth century. He touches, among other things, on eighteenth-century androids, Christian Dior's New Look, Atlas missiles, cybernetics and cyborgs, latex, JFK's carefully cultivated image, the CBS lunar broadcast soundstage, NASA's Mission Control, and the applications of Apollo-style engineering to city planning. The twenty-one-layer spacesuit, de Monchaux argues, offers an object lesson. It tells us about redundancy and interdependence and about the distinctions between natural and man-made complexity; it teaches us to know the virtues of adaptation and to see the future as a set of possibilities rather than a scripted scenario.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.