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Vitruvius: Writing the Body of Architecture

Vitruvius: Writing the Body of Architecture Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Vitruvius's De architectura is the only major work on architecture to survive from classical antiquity, and until the eighteenth century it was the text to which all other architectural treatises referred. While European classicists have focused on the factual truth of the text itself, English-speaking architects and architectural theorists have viewed it as a timeless source of valuable metaphors. Departing from both perspectives, Indra Kagis McEwen examines the work's meaning and significance in its own time.

Vitruvius dedicated De architectura to his patron Augustus Caesar, the first Roman emperor, whose rise to power inspired its composition near the end of the first century B.C. McEwen argues that the imperial project of world dominion shaped Vitruvius's purpose in writing what he calls "the whole body of architecture." Specifically, Vitruvius's aim was to present his discipline as the means for making the emperor's body congruent with the imagined body of the world he would rule.

Each of the book's four chapters treats a different Vitruvian "body." Chapter 1, "The Angelic Body, " deals with the book as a book, in terms of contemporary events and thought, particularly Stoicism and Stoic theories of language. Chapter 2, "The Herculean Body, " addresses the book's and its author's relation to Augustus, whose double Vitruvius means the architec to be. Chapter 3, "The Body Beautiful, " discusses the relation of proportion and geometry to architectural beauty and the role of beauty in forging the new world order.Finally, Chapter 4, "The Body of the King, " explores the nature and unprecedented extent of Augustan building programs. Included is an examination of the famous statue of Augustus from Prima Porta, sculpted soon after the appearance of De architectura.

Synopsis:

A historical study of Vitruvius's De architectura, showing that his purpose in writing "the whole body of architecture" was shaped by the imperial Roman project of world dominion.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;Vitruvius's De architectura is the only major work on architecture to survive from classical antiquity, and until the eighteenth century it was the text to which all other architectural treatises referred. While European classicists have focused on the factual truth of the text itself, English-speaking architects and architectural theorists have viewed it as a timeless source of valuable metaphors. Departing from both perspectives, Indra Kagis McEwen examines the work's meaning and significance in its own time.Vitruvius dedicated De architectura to his patron Augustus Caesar, the first Roman emperor, whose rise to power inspired its composition near the end of the first century B.C. McEwen argues that the imperial project of world dominion shaped Vitruvius's purpose in writing what he calls "the whole body of architecture." Specifically, Vitruvius's aim was to present his discipline as the means for making the emperor's body congruent with the imagined body of the world he would rule.Each of the book's four chapters treats a different Vitruvian "body." Chapter 1, "The Angelic Body," deals with the book as a book, in terms of contemporary events and thought, particularly Stoicism and Stoic theories of language. Chapter 2, "The Herculean Body," addresses the book's and its author's relation to Augustus, whose double Vitruvius means the architect to be. Chapter 3, "The Body Beautiful," discusses the relation of proportion and geometry to architectural beauty and the role of beauty in forging the new world order. Finally, chapter 4, "The Body of the King," explores the nature and unprecedented extent of Augustan building programs. Included is an examination of the famous statue of Augustus from Prima Porta, sculpted soon after the appearance of De architectura.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

A historical study of Vitruvius's De architectura, showing that his purpose in writing "the whole body of architecture"was shaped by the imperial Roman project of world dominion.

About the Author

Indra Kagis McEwen is a postdoctoral fellow at the Canadian Centre for Architecture and lecturer at the National Theatre School of Canada in Montreal.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262134156
Subtitle:
Writing the Body of Architecture
Author:
McEwen, Indra Kagis
Author:
McEw
Author:
en, Indra Kagis
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge, Mass.
Subject:
General
Subject:
History - General
Subject:
Architecture
Subject:
Early works to 1800
Subject:
Individual Architect
Subject:
History : General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Individual Architects & Firms - General
Subject:
Vitruvius Pollio
Subject:
Architecture-Architects
Series:
Vitruvius
Series Volume:
bk. 1
Publication Date:
20030314
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
56 illus.
Pages:
507
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Ancient
Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Architects
Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » History » General
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » General

Vitruvius: Writing the Body of Architecture
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Product details 507 pages MIT Press - English 9780262134156 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A historical study of Vitruvius's De architectura, showing that his purpose in writing "the whole body of architecture" was shaped by the imperial Roman project of world dominion.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;Vitruvius's De architectura is the only major work on architecture to survive from classical antiquity, and until the eighteenth century it was the text to which all other architectural treatises referred. While European classicists have focused on the factual truth of the text itself, English-speaking architects and architectural theorists have viewed it as a timeless source of valuable metaphors. Departing from both perspectives, Indra Kagis McEwen examines the work's meaning and significance in its own time.Vitruvius dedicated De architectura to his patron Augustus Caesar, the first Roman emperor, whose rise to power inspired its composition near the end of the first century B.C. McEwen argues that the imperial project of world dominion shaped Vitruvius's purpose in writing what he calls "the whole body of architecture." Specifically, Vitruvius's aim was to present his discipline as the means for making the emperor's body congruent with the imagined body of the world he would rule.Each of the book's four chapters treats a different Vitruvian "body." Chapter 1, "The Angelic Body," deals with the book as a book, in terms of contemporary events and thought, particularly Stoicism and Stoic theories of language. Chapter 2, "The Herculean Body," addresses the book's and its author's relation to Augustus, whose double Vitruvius means the architect to be. Chapter 3, "The Body Beautiful," discusses the relation of proportion and geometry to architectural beauty and the role of beauty in forging the new world order. Finally, chapter 4, "The Body of the King," explores the nature and unprecedented extent of Augustan building programs. Included is an examination of the famous statue of Augustus from Prima Porta, sculpted soon after the appearance of De architectura.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , A historical study of Vitruvius's De architectura, showing that his purpose in writing "the whole body of architecture"was shaped by the imperial Roman project of world dominion.
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