Poetry Madness
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Q&A | February 27, 2014

Rene Denfeld: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Rene Denfeld



Describe your latest book. The Enchanted is a story narrated by a man on death row. The novel was inspired by my work as a death penalty... Continue »
  1. $18.19 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Enchanted

    Rene Denfeld 9780062285508

spacer

On Order

$34.95
New Hardcover
Currently out of stock.
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Qty Store Section
- Local Warehouse Computers Reference- Social Aspects

More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

Me++: The Cyborg Self and the Networked City

by

Me++: The Cyborg Self and the Networked City Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

With Me++ the author of City of Bits and e-topia completes an informal trilogy examining the ramifications of information technology in everyday life. William Mitchell describes the transformation of wireless technology in the hundred years since Marconi?the scaling up of networks and the scaling down of the apparatus for transmission and reception. It is, he says, as if "Brobdingnag had been rebooted as Lilliput"; Marconi's massive mechanism of tower and kerosene engine has been replaced by a palm-size cell phone. If the operators of Marconi's invention can be seen as human appendages to an immobile machine, today's hand-held devices can be seen as extensions of the human body. This transformation has, in turn, changed our relationship with our surroundings and with each other. The cell phone calls from the collapsing World Trade Center towers and the hijacked jets on September 11 were testimony to the intensity of this new state of continuous electronic engagement.

Thus, Mitchell proposes, the "trial separation" of bits (the elementary unit of information) and atoms (the elementary unit of matter) is over. With increasing frequency, events in physical space reflect events in cyberspace, and vice versa; digital information can, for example, direct the movement of an aircraft or a robot arm. In Me++ Mitchell examines the effects of wireless linkage, global interconnection, miniaturization, and portability on our bodies, our clothing, our architecture, our cities, and our uses of space and time. He argues that a world governed less and less by boundaries and more and more by connections requires us to reimagine and reconstruct our environment and to reconsider the ethical foundations of design, engineering, and planning practice.

Review:

"An exhilarating, but also sometimes terrifying, account of how humanity is being reshaped by its new machines. This is the best tour guide yet written to the brave new world of the digital present." Mike Davis, author of Dead Cities

Review:

"Witty, urbane, and informed by a remarkably wide range of reference, Me++ surveys the ways in which digital technologies are transforming our world and ourselves. I cannot think of a better guide to these coming changes than William Mitchell. He is able to see the future without losing sight of the past, and he embodies the technologically savvy yet still deeply humanistic perspective we need to understand and evaluate where our technologies are leading us?and where we should be leading them." N. Katherine Hayles, Hillis Professor of Literature, English Department and Design/Media Arts, University of California, Los Angeles

Review:

"William Mitchell has a rare understanding of the ways in which emerging network culture is changing the social, political, and economic fabric as well as transforming the architecture of cities and the subjects who inhabit them. Savvy, insightful and provocative, Me++ is required reading for anyone baffled by the present and concerned about the future." Mark C. Taylor, Columbia University and Williams College

Review:

"Mitchell has done it again! This concluding volume of the 'Mitchell trilogy' is at least as disturbingly insightful, as stylistically scintillating, as its predecessors. If you really want to understand how profoundly our world is being transformed by networked communications, read Me++ now." Professor Sir Peter Hall, Director, Institute of Community Studies, Bartlett Professor of Planning, University College London

Synopsis:

How the transformation of wireless technology and the creation of an interconnected world are changing our environment and our lives.

Synopsis:

With Me++ the author of City of Bits and e-topia completes an informal trilogy examining the ramifications of information technology in everyday life. William Mitchell describes the transformation of wireless technology in the hundred years since Marconi--the scaling up of networks and the scaling down of the apparatus for transmission and reception. It is, he says, as if "Brobdingnag had been rebooted as Lilliput"; Marconi's massive mechanism of tower and kerosene engine has been replaced by a palm-size cellphone. If the operators of Marconi's invention can be seen as human appendages to an immobile machine, today's hand-held devices can be seen as extensions of the human body. This transformation has, in turn, changed our relationship with our surroundings and with each other. The cellphone calls from the collapsing World Trade Center towers and the hijacked jets on September 11 were testimony to the intensity of this new state of continuous electronic engagement.Thus, Mitchell proposes, the "trial separation" of bits (the elementary unit of information) and atoms (the elementary unit of matter) is over. With increasing frequency, events in physical space reflect events in cyberspace, and vice versa; digital information can, for example, direct the movement of an aircraft or a robot arm. In Me++ Mitchell examines the effects of wireless linkage, global interconnection, miniaturization, and portability on our bodies, our clothing, our architecture, our cities, and our uses of space and time. Computer viruses, cascading power outages, terrorist infiltration of transportation networks, and cellphone conversations in the streets are symptoms of a dramatic new urban condition--that of ubiquitous, inescapable network interconnectivity. He argues that a world governed less and less by boundaries and more and more by connections requires us to reimagine and reconstruct our environment and to reconsider the ethical foundations of design, engineering, and planning practice.

Synopsis:

Includes bibliographical references (p. [213]-249) and index.

About the Author

William J. Mitchell was the Alexander W. Dreyfoos, Jr., Professor of Architecture and Media Arts and Sciences and directed the Smart Cities research group at MIT's Media Lab. He authored many books, including The World's Greatest Architect (2008) and Placing Words: Symbols, Space, and the City (2005), both published by the MIT Press.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262134347
Author:
Mitchell, William J.
Publisher:
MIT Press (MA)
Author:
Mitchell, William J.
Location:
Cambridge, Mass.
Subject:
General
Subject:
Computer networks
Subject:
Telecommunication
Subject:
Information superhighway
Subject:
Cyberspace
Subject:
Social Aspects - General
Subject:
Popular Culture - General
Subject:
General Architecture
Subject:
Computers Reference-Social Aspects
Series:
Me++
Series Volume:
2300-13
Publication Date:
20031031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Yes
Pages:
269
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Other books you might like

  1. Empire of Mind New Trade Paper $46.75
  2. Energies: An Illustrated Guide to... Used Trade Paper $12.00
  3. New Digital Cinema : Reinventing the... Used Trade Paper $15.00
  4. Cool Energy - Revised Edition:... Used Trade Paper $9.95
  5. New Media Art (06 Edition) Used Trade Paper $6.00
  6. NO LOGO: No Space, No Choice, No Jobs Used Trade Paper $3.95

Related Subjects

» Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » General
» Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Social Aspects » General
» Computers and Internet » Internet » General
» Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
» History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
» History and Social Science » Sociology » General
» History and Social Science » Sociology » Urban Studies » General
» Reference » Science Reference » Sociology of Science

Me++: The Cyborg Self and the Networked City New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$34.95 Backorder
Product details 269 pages MIT Press - English 9780262134347 Reviews:
"Review" by , "An exhilarating, but also sometimes terrifying, account of how humanity is being reshaped by its new machines. This is the best tour guide yet written to the brave new world of the digital present."
"Review" by , "Witty, urbane, and informed by a remarkably wide range of reference, Me++ surveys the ways in which digital technologies are transforming our world and ourselves. I cannot think of a better guide to these coming changes than William Mitchell. He is able to see the future without losing sight of the past, and he embodies the technologically savvy yet still deeply humanistic perspective we need to understand and evaluate where our technologies are leading us?and where we should be leading them." N. Katherine Hayles, Hillis Professor of Literature, English Department and Design/Media Arts, University of California, Los Angeles
"Review" by , "William Mitchell has a rare understanding of the ways in which emerging network culture is changing the social, political, and economic fabric as well as transforming the architecture of cities and the subjects who inhabit them. Savvy, insightful and provocative, Me++ is required reading for anyone baffled by the present and concerned about the future."
"Review" by , "Mitchell has done it again! This concluding volume of the 'Mitchell trilogy' is at least as disturbingly insightful, as stylistically scintillating, as its predecessors. If you really want to understand how profoundly our world is being transformed by networked communications, read Me++ now." Professor Sir Peter Hall, Director, Institute of Community Studies, Bartlett Professor of Planning, University College London
"Synopsis" by , How the transformation of wireless technology and the creation of an interconnected world are changing our environment and our lives.
"Synopsis" by , With Me++ the author of City of Bits and e-topia completes an informal trilogy examining the ramifications of information technology in everyday life. William Mitchell describes the transformation of wireless technology in the hundred years since Marconi--the scaling up of networks and the scaling down of the apparatus for transmission and reception. It is, he says, as if "Brobdingnag had been rebooted as Lilliput"; Marconi's massive mechanism of tower and kerosene engine has been replaced by a palm-size cellphone. If the operators of Marconi's invention can be seen as human appendages to an immobile machine, today's hand-held devices can be seen as extensions of the human body. This transformation has, in turn, changed our relationship with our surroundings and with each other. The cellphone calls from the collapsing World Trade Center towers and the hijacked jets on September 11 were testimony to the intensity of this new state of continuous electronic engagement.Thus, Mitchell proposes, the "trial separation" of bits (the elementary unit of information) and atoms (the elementary unit of matter) is over. With increasing frequency, events in physical space reflect events in cyberspace, and vice versa; digital information can, for example, direct the movement of an aircraft or a robot arm. In Me++ Mitchell examines the effects of wireless linkage, global interconnection, miniaturization, and portability on our bodies, our clothing, our architecture, our cities, and our uses of space and time. Computer viruses, cascading power outages, terrorist infiltration of transportation networks, and cellphone conversations in the streets are symptoms of a dramatic new urban condition--that of ubiquitous, inescapable network interconnectivity. He argues that a world governed less and less by boundaries and more and more by connections requires us to reimagine and reconstruct our environment and to reconsider the ethical foundations of design, engineering, and planning practice.
"Synopsis" by , Includes bibliographical references (p. [213]-249) and index.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.