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Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City (Inside Technology)

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverse and included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets were primarily a motor thoroughfares where children did not belong and where pedestrians were condemned as andquot;jaywalkers.andquot; In Fighting Traffic, Peter Norton argues that to accommodate automobiles, the American city required not only a physical change but also a social one: before the city could be reconstructed for the sake of motorists, its streets had to be socially reconstructed as places where motorists belonged. It was not an evolution, he writes, but a bloody and sometimes violent revolution. Norton describes how street users struggled to define and redefine what streets were for. He examines developments in the crucial transitional years from the 1910s to the 1930s, uncovering a broad anti-automobile campaign that reviled motorists as andquot;road hogsandquot; or andquot;speed demonsandquot; and cars as andquot;juggernautsandquot; or andquot;death cars.andquot; He considers the perspectives of all users--pedestrians, police (who had to become andquot;traffic copsandquot;), street railways, downtown businesses, traffic engineers (who often saw cars as the problem, not the solution), and automobile promoters. He finds that pedestrians and parents campaigned in moral terms, fighting for andquot;justice.andquot; Cities and downtown businesses tried to regulate traffic in the name of andquot;efficiency.andquot; Automotive interest groups, meanwhile, legitimized their claim to the streets by invoking andquot;freedomandquot;--a rhetorical stance of particular power in the United States. Fighting Traffic offers a new look at both the origins of the automotive city in America and how social groups shape technological change.Peter D. Norton is Assistant Professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society at the University of Virginia. andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

The fight for the future of the city street between pedestrians, street railways, and promoters of the automobile between 1915 and 1930.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;The fight for the future of the city street between pedestrians, street railways, and promoters of the automobile between 1915 and 1930.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverseand included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets wereprimarily a motor thoroughfares where children did not belong and where pedestrianswere condemned as jaywalkers. In Fighting Traffic, Peter Norton arguesthat to accommodate automobiles, the American city required not only a physicalchange but also a social one: before the city could be reconstructed for the sake ofmotorists, its streets had to be socially reconstructed as places where motoristsbelonged. It was not an evolution, he writes, but a bloody and sometimes violentrevolution. Norton describes how street users struggled to define and redefine whatstreets were for. He examines developments in the crucial transitional years fromthe 1910s to the 1930s, uncovering a broad anti-automobile campaign that reviledmotorists as road hogs or speed demons and cars asjuggernauts or death cars. He considers the perspectives ofall users--pedestrians, police (who had to become traffic cops), streetrailways, downtown businesses, traffic engineers (who often saw cars as the problem, not the solution), and automobile promoters. He finds that pedestrians and parentscampaigned in moral terms, fighting for justice. Cities and downtownbusinesses tried to regulate traffic in the name of efficiency.Automotive interest groups, meanwhile, legitimized their claim to the streets byinvoking freedom--a rhetorical stance of particular power in the UnitedStates. Fighting Traffic offers a new look at both the origins of the automotivecity in America and how social groups shape technological change.Peter D. Norton isAssistant Professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society at theUniversity of Virginia.

Synopsis:

Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverse and included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets were primarily motor thoroughfares where children did not belong and where pedestrians were condemned as jaywalkers. In

About the Author

Peter D. Norton is Assistant Professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society at the University of Virginia.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262516129
Subtitle:
The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City
Author:
Norton, Peter D.
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Engineering -- History.
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Inside Technology Fighting Traffic
Publication Date:
20110121
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
40
Pages:
408
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1 in

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Architecture » Urban Planning
Engineering » Engineering » History
Reference » Science Reference » Technology
Science and Mathematics » History of Science » Technology
Transportation » Automotive » General

Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City (Inside Technology) New Trade Paper
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Product details 408 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262516129 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The fight for the future of the city street between pedestrians, street railways, and promoters of the automobile between 1915 and 1930.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;The fight for the future of the city street between pedestrians, street railways, and promoters of the automobile between 1915 and 1930.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverseand included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets wereprimarily a motor thoroughfares where children did not belong and where pedestrianswere condemned as jaywalkers. In Fighting Traffic, Peter Norton arguesthat to accommodate automobiles, the American city required not only a physicalchange but also a social one: before the city could be reconstructed for the sake ofmotorists, its streets had to be socially reconstructed as places where motoristsbelonged. It was not an evolution, he writes, but a bloody and sometimes violentrevolution. Norton describes how street users struggled to define and redefine whatstreets were for. He examines developments in the crucial transitional years fromthe 1910s to the 1930s, uncovering a broad anti-automobile campaign that reviledmotorists as road hogs or speed demons and cars asjuggernauts or death cars. He considers the perspectives ofall users--pedestrians, police (who had to become traffic cops), streetrailways, downtown businesses, traffic engineers (who often saw cars as the problem, not the solution), and automobile promoters. He finds that pedestrians and parentscampaigned in moral terms, fighting for justice. Cities and downtownbusinesses tried to regulate traffic in the name of efficiency.Automotive interest groups, meanwhile, legitimized their claim to the streets byinvoking freedom--a rhetorical stance of particular power in the UnitedStates. Fighting Traffic offers a new look at both the origins of the automotivecity in America and how social groups shape technological change.Peter D. Norton isAssistant Professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society at theUniversity of Virginia.
"Synopsis" by , Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverse and included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets were primarily motor thoroughfares where children did not belong and where pedestrians were condemned as jaywalkers. In
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